Taipei Times: New Web site sheds light on cultural history

Taipei Times: New Web site sheds light on cultural history. “The Taiwan Cultural Memory Bank… curates people’s recollections and historic documentation in words, images, artifacts, audiovisual assets and other media to reconstruct Taiwan’s historical eras, the ministry said in a statement, adding that the memories are collected and introduced to the world on the Web site.” The site is in Chinese but translates okay for the most part, except for a couple of places where Chinese writing is part of a graphic and not translated.

Washington Post: In a few days, more people in Trump’s orbit tested positive for coronavirus than in all of Taiwan

Washington Post: In a few days, more people in Trump’s orbit tested positive for coronavirus than in all of Taiwan. “In President Trump’s personal orbit, the coronavirus case count continues to creep upward. More than a dozen White House officials have recently tested positive for the novel coronavirus, including some who are among the at least nine guests and two journalists who tested positive after they attended Amy Coney Barrett’s Sept. 26 Supreme Court nomination event in the Rose Garden.”

Slate: How Tech Tools Helped Taiwanese Activists Turn a Social Movement Into Real Policy Change

Slate: How Tech Tools Helped Taiwanese Activists Turn a Social Movement Into Real Policy Change. “One community of civic-oriented programmers active in the Sunflower Movement named g0v (pronounced ‘gov-zero’) assembled a collection of open source programs to build vTaiwan, a hybrid online and in-person deliberation process. VTaiwan has a broad set of features that help citizens, government agencies, and civil society reach agreements on contentious issues. The process allows users to transparently propose policies and crowdsource facts, facilitate public discussion, deliberate with key stakeholders, and draft suggested changes.”

The Register: Fake Zoom alerts and dodgy medical freebies among COVID-cracks detected by Taiwan’s CERT

The Register: Fake Zoom alerts and dodgy medical freebies among COVID-cracks detected by Taiwan’s CERT. “Taiwan’s CERT detected cyber-crooks impersonating medical authorities to attack the country’s tech industry during the early stages of the COVID pandemic. Since the beginning of the pandemic, the organisation noted an uptick in the number of attacks using malicious domain names to confuse victims, it said at the APNIC 50 conference. Hackers also impersonated trusted bodies such as the World Health Organisation or America’s Centers for Disease Control and sent phishing emails offering free protective equipment such as face masks.”

The Register: Taiwan turfs out video streamers run by China’s web giants

The Register: Taiwan turfs out video streamers run by China’s web giants. “Taiwan has moved to turf out Chinese video-streamers operated by Tencent and Baidu. A [August 18] notice from Taiwan’s Ministry of Economic Affairs makes it an offence for local businesses to facilitate Tencent’s WeTV and Baidu’s iQIYI in the nation. Neither operates in Taiwan, but both have found local proxies that bring their services into the island nation.”

Taipei Times: Taiwan’s wildlife database the second-largest in Asia

Taipei Times: Taiwan’s wildlife database the second-largest in Asia . “A database on biodiversity in Taiwan has compiled records of almost 10 million wildlife sightings, making it the second-largest wildlife index in Asia, with the vast majority of data coming from volunteers, the Council of Agriculture’s Endemic Species Research Institute said. The Taiwan Biodiversity Network, which was launched in 2007, has recorded 9.87 million animal and plant sightings, Ko Chih-jen (柯智仁), an assistant researcher at the institute, said… adding that India maintains Asia’s largest database with up to 19 million recorded sightings.”

Focus Taiwan: Taiwan launches website to share COVID-19 experience worldwide

Focus Taiwan: Taiwan launches website to share COVID-19 experience worldwide. “The Ministry of Health and Welfare has launched a website to share with the world the successful policies that Taiwan has implemented in its prevention efforts against the COVID-19 pandemic, the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) said Sunday.”

Taiwan News: Taiwan government database leaked on dark web

Taiwan News: Taiwan government database leaked on dark web. “It was reported on Friday (May 29) that a government database of more than 20 million Taiwanese citizens was leaked on the dark web. According to researchers at Cyble Inc., Toogod, a ‘known and reputable actor’ was found to have released the data titled, ‘Taiwan Whole Country Home Registry DB,’ onto the dark web. It is unusual for an entire nation’s database to be leaked, Cyble reported. The data is from the Ministry of the Interior’s Department of Household Registration.”

TIME: Missing Baseball? Taiwanese Games Are Now Broadcasting in English. Here’s How to Watch Live

TIME: Missing Baseball? Taiwanese Games Are Now Broadcasting in English. Here’s How to Watch Live. “In an attempt to raise the profile of Taiwanese baseball, Eleven Sports network is streaming home games for one Taiwanese team, the Rakuten Monkeys, live on Twitter with English commentary—for free. Simply visit the Eleven Sports on Twitter.”

BetaNews: Taiwanese government bans agencies from using Zoom because of security concerns

BetaNews: Taiwanese government bans agencies from using Zoom because of security concerns. “Following on from numerous schools across America implementing bans on the use of Zoom, the government of Taiwan is forbidding agencies from using the video conferencing service because of concerns about security.”

Poynter: Disinformers are targeting Taiwan as a country where coronavirus is out of control

Poynter: Disinformers are targeting Taiwan as a country where coronavirus is out of control. “While struggling to fight the new coronavirus, Taiwan is also witnessing a serious digital attack driven by malicious disinformers. In the last few days, dozens of profiles and bots on Facebook and Twitter have posted different pieces of content suggesting that the COVID-19 is completely out of control in Taiwan and that the government doesn’t know what to do to protect its people. Active fact-checkers can already see political motivation behind it.”

Focus Taiwan: TJC unveils online database of persecutions in martial law period

This in “Around” instead of “New Resources” because I can’t find an URL for this new database. Focus Taiwan: TJC unveils online database of persecutions in martial law period. “Taiwan’s Transitional Justice Commission (TJC) on Wednesday launched a searchable online database of curated court files of nearly 10,000 victims of political persecution during the country’s martial law period. The database also contains the names of the military officers involved in the court trials of the victims.”

BusinessWire: MOC Elevates Tea Industry through Cultural Approaches

BusinessWire: MOC Elevates Tea Industry through Cultural Approaches (PRESS RELEASE). “To preserve Taiwan’s tea culture systematically, the Ministry of Culture launched the Improving Tea Industry through Cultural Approaches project, utilizing digital preservation and value-added application methods to plan a tea cultural route for the public. In 2019, the project has registered a total of 2,036 data relating to tea industry, spanning tea manufacturing equipment, tea plant varieties, cultivation, and tea diseases. It has also collected information and documents on tea activities, tea factories, and tea shops, as well as authors and researchers engaging in tea culture and studies.” I did not see an English version of the content available at the link provided.

Collective Memories of Golden Years: Highlights from the 1950s to 1960s Taiwan (BusinessWire PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Collective Memories of Golden Years: Highlights from the 1950s to 1960s Taiwan (PRESS RELEASE). “In response to the Taiwan Cultural Memory Bank project, the Central News Agency established a digital archive to presents the history of Taiwan since 1949, the year when the Republic of China government retreated to Taiwan, to 1960. Titled ‘Golden Years of Taiwan: 1949-1960,’ the digital archive offers glimpses of the development of Taiwan’s diverse cultures, major industries, and public infrastructure, as well as key events over the decade.” I did not see an English option, and Google did not prompt me to translate. I put it in Google’s Web page translator about five minutes ago and it’s still spinning. Your mileage may vary.

Taipei Times: Lawmaker urges university to hand over KMT files

Taipei Times: Lawmaker urges university to hand over KMT files . “Democratic Progressive Party Legislator Lai Jui-lung (賴瑞隆) yesterday urged National Taiwan University to hand over historical files associated with the Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) to the Transitional Justice Commission so that they could be made public.”