Wired: A Remote Tanzanian Village Logs Onto the Internet

Wired: A Remote Tanzanian Village Logs Onto the Internet. “Over a week, engineers from Copenhagen-based company Bluetown erected an 80-foot Wi-Fi tower topped with shiny solar panels and a microwave link antenna. It connected to a fiber backhaul 15 miles away, creating a half-mile-wide hot spot with download speeds up to 10 Mbps—fast enough for Netflix. Villagers rented smartphones from the company and paid 50 cents per gigabyte for the data they used, just over 1 percent of the average monthly income. And just like that, life began to change.”

The Citizen (Tanzania): Education authority to launch free online school library

The Citizen (Tanzania): Education authority to launch free online school library. “The online library, run by the Tanzania Institute of Education (TIE), is a platform that offers free access to books to all public schools in the country, while those in private schools and individuals will pay at least Sh4,000 to access 48 textbooks and Sh2,000 to access supplementary readers.” 4000 Tanzania shillings is a little less than $2 USD, according to Google’s currency converter.

Techdirt: Governor Of Tanzania’s Capital Announces Plan To Round Up Everyone Who Was Too Gay On Social Media

Techdirt: Governor Of Tanzania’s Capital Announces Plan To Round Up Everyone Who Was Too Gay On Social Media. “There has been an unfortunate trend in far too many African nations in which governments there look at the internet as either a source of evil in their countries or purely as a source for tax revenue, or both. The end result in many cases is a speech tax of sorts being placed on citizens in these countries, with traffic being taxed, bloggers being forced to register with the federal government, and populations that could otherwise benefit from a free and open internet being essentially priced out of the benefit altogether.”

Techdirt: Tanzania Plans To Outlaw Fact-Checking Of Government Statistics

Techdirt: Tanzania Plans To Outlaw Fact-Checking Of Government Statistics. “Back in April, Techdirt wrote about a set of regulations brought in by the Tanzanian government that required people there to pay around $900 per year for a license to blog. Despite the very high costs it imposes on people — Tanzania’s GDP per capita was under $900 in 2016 — it seems the authorities are serious about enforcing the law.”

The Verge: Strict new internet laws in Tanzania are driving bloggers and content creators offline

The Verge: Strict new internet laws in Tanzania are driving bloggers and content creators offline. “In May, Tanzanian bloggers lost an appeal that had temporarily suspended a new set of regulations granting the country’s Communication Regulatory Authority discretionary powers to censor online content. Officially dubbed the Electronic and Postal Communications (Online Content) Regulations, 2018, the statute, which the Tanzanian government is counting among its efforts to curb hate speech and fake news, requires online content creators — traditional media websites, online TV and radio channels, but also individual bloggers and podcasters — to pay roughly two million Tanzanian shillings (930 US dollars) in registration and licensing fees.”

Quartz: Tanzania’s repressive online laws have forced the “Swahili Wikileaks” to close

Quartz: Tanzania’s repressive online laws have forced the “Swahili Wikileaks” to close. “Jamii Forums announced it was forced to comply with a government notice that it apply for an online license or cease operation ahead of the June 15 deadline. As part of the new restrictions, the government must certify all bloggers and charge an annual license fee of over $900. Those defying the new orders face fines starting at five million Tanzanian shillings ($2,200) or a year in prison.”

The Next Web: Tanzania imposes strict social media regulations to stop ‘moral decadence’

The Next Web: Tanzania imposes strict social media regulations to stop ‘moral decadence’. “Tanzania has finally signed into law their eyebrow-raising new regulation that will govern social media and blogging. The regulation known as the Electronic and Postal Communications (Online Content) Regulations 2017, was initially published by the Tanzania Communications Regulatory Authority (TCRA) and came into effect during March 2018.”

The Daily (Tanzania): Govt plans global Kiswahili spread

The Daily (Tanzania): Govt plans global Kiswahili spread. “THE Government has announced plans to set up database of professional Kiswahili teachers to facilitate identification and capacities of available professionals needed to popularise the language across the world.” Never heard of Kiswahili? The English name is Swahili.

Tanzania: Government to regulate social media (IT News Africa)

IT News Africa: Tanzania: Government to regulate social media. “Social media users in Tanzania who break the new law set by the government will be blocked by the Tanzania Communications Regulatory Authority (TCRA). The government drafted regulations for online content producers and users on social media. The TCRA published the draft Electronic and Postal Communications (Online Content) Regulations, 2017, and the bill will come into force once signed by the information minister.”

Tanzania: Govt Tightens Noose On Social Media (AllAfrica)

AllAfrica: Tanzania: Govt Tightens Noose On Social Media. “The government has drafted sweeping regulations to tighten its grip on online content producers and users across popular social media platforms. The Tanzania Communications Regulatory Authority (TCRA) will have unfettered powers to police the web. It will also licence all content providers, including bloggers.”

allAfrica – Tanzania: How Social Media Is Shaking Up Govt

allAfrica: Tanzania: How Social Media Is Shaking Up Govt. “When a group of trainee teachers at a school in Mbeya savaged a hapless student in a typical Hollywood gangster style last week, the outrage was palpable. It wasn’t just the public that rushed to condemn the senseless battering of the student, within hours, regional authorities and cabinet ministers also chipped in. And within hours the, the government reacted by firing the ‘mafia’ trainee teachers. Interestingly, all it took was a video clip of the shocking incident that went viral on various social media platforms.”

New Oil and Gas Database for Tanzania

The country of Tanzania has a new oil and gas database. “The Tanzania Oil and Gas Almanac, a database prepared by the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES) Tanzania, will act as a single gateway for oil and gas information and data. The chief editor of the almanac, Mr Abdallah Katunzi, said having the database is crucial for policymakers, researchers, media and the public to obtain data on the extractive industry.” The database will be available in both English and Kiswahili.