Wired: Ad Tech Could Be the Next Internet Bubble

Wired: Ad Tech Could Be the Next Internet Bubble. “The technique is called behavioral advertising, and it raises the frightening prospect that we’ve been made the subjects of a highly personalized form of mind control. Or maybe that fear is precisely backwards. The real trouble with digital advertising, argues former Google employee Tim Hwang—and the more immediate danger to our way of life—is that it doesn’t work.”

Wired: Companies Can Track Your Phone’s Movements to Target Ads

Wired: Companies Can Track Your Phone’s Movements to Target Ads. “GOOGLE AND APPLE have taken steps this year they say will help users shield themselves from hundreds of companies that compile profiles based on online behavior. Meanwhile, other companies are devising new ways to probe more deeply into other aspects of our lives.”

CNET: Targeted ads stalking you on your iPhone? Here’s how to limit them

CNET: Targeted ads stalking you on your iPhone? Here’s how to limit them. “When iOS 14 is released this fall, iPhone ($699 at Apple) users will have to opt in to targeted advertising. It’s not a stretch to assume that users aren’t going to eagerly opt in and allow Facebook, or any advertiser for that matter, to track their internet usage when given a choice. But what about limiting ad tracking on your iPhone right now, even before iOS 14 is available? It’s possible, but it’s only possible in Apple’s own ad network. Below I’ll walk you through how to limit ad tracking, what exactly that means, and offer some of my own anecdotal experience after testing it myself.”

BuzzMachine: In defense of targeting

BuzzMachine: In defense of targeting. “In defending targeting, I am not defending Facebook, I am attacking mass media and what its business model has done to democracy — including on Facebook. With targeting, a small business, a new candidate, a nascent movement can efficiently and inexpensively reach people who would be interested in their messages so they may transact or assemble and act.”

Lifehacker: Spinner Incepts Your Friends With Hyper-Targeted Ads

Lifehacker: Spinner Incepts Your Friends With Hyper-Targeted Ads. “The advertising industry is a cesspool of manipulation and misinformation. And now you can use it to convince your partner to let you get a dog. Or convince them to settle your divorce out of court, because they caught you using hyper-targeted internet ads to convince them to let you get a dog. The Spinner promises to serve content ads to one person of your choice, all pushing a specific agenda.”

The Verge: YouTube will reportedly halt targeted ads for videos that appeal to kids

The Verge: YouTube will reportedly halt targeted ads for videos that appeal to kids. “YouTube is ‘finalizing plans’ to end targeted advertising on its main site for uploaded videos that children are likely to watch, according to a new report from Bloomberg. The move could be meant to appease regulators at the Federal Trade Commission who have examined whether YouTube has violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) through data collection and a failure to protect young users on the platform.”

Washington Post: Facebook agrees to overhaul targeted advertising system for job, housing and loan ads after discrimination complaints

Washington Post: Facebook agrees to overhaul targeted advertising system for job, housing and loan ads after discrimination complaints. “Facebook on Tuesday agreed to overhaul its lucrative targeted advertising system to settle accusations that landlords, lenders and employers use the platform to discriminate, a significant shift for a company that built a business empire on selling personal data.”

CNET: How to remove your phone number from Facebook (and prevent targeted ads)

CNET: How to remove your phone number from Facebook (and prevent targeted ads) . “If you use two-factor authentication (2FA) to secure your Facebook account, you likely, at some point, gave Facebook your phone number. 2FA adds an almost impenetrable layer of security to your Facebook account, since it requires you to enter a code sent via text message before logging in. What you likely didn’t know was that Facebook would use that data — your phone number — to target you with ads.”

Neowin: Mozilla Fellows develop extension to let you learn about and thwart targeted ads

Neowin: Mozilla Fellows develop extension to let you learn about and thwart targeted ads. “Most people realise things on the internet are not free and either need to be maintained by a subscription or through advertising. In the case of ads, firms like Google and Facebook aggressively track users in order to show better ads, but the amount of data they hold is a bit troubling. Several Mozilla Fellows decided to create a new add-on for Chrome and Firefox called Fuzzify.me which aims to tell you why certain ads are shown to you, and gives you the power to thwart these ads.”

CNET: Here’s how quickly Facebook rebuilt its profile on me

CNET: Here’s how quickly Facebook rebuilt its profile on me. “Facebook got to know me in just two months. Like, really got to know me. I deleted my decade-old Facebook page in March, purging more than 10 years of bad high school posts and college blunders. But I still needed to be on Facebook, so I created a new one the same day.”

Museum Hack: How A Targeted Facebook Ad Campaign Led To 6X The Facebook Page Likes For The Illinois State Museum

Museum Hack: How A Targeted Facebook Ad Campaign Led To 6X The Facebook Page Likes For The Illinois State Museum. “Many museums already face a bit of an uphill climb when it comes to attracting and engaging new audiences. When state budget constraints closed the Illinois State Museum for nine months, museum officials knew they needed some fresh new ideas to regenerate interest in the museum once its doors were reopened.”

The Telegraph: How just one Facebook ‘like’ can be used to influence behaviour with targeted adverts

The Telegraph: How just one Facebook ‘like’ can be used to influence behaviour with targeted adverts. “Researchers used ‘mass psychological persuasion’ in an online ad campaign that saw sales rise by more than 50 percent. In an experiment that targeted 3.5 million people, the academics used just a single Facebook ‘like’ for each user to glean a psychological trait – whether they were introverted or extroverted. This characteristic was then used to tailor an ad for each consumer in an effort to influence them.”