WFLA: New law creates Florida database for teacher firings, resignations over sexual misconduct

WFLA: New law creates Florida database for teacher firings, resignations over sexual misconduct. “HB 131 requires the Florida Department of Education to create and maintain a list of people who are disqualified from teaching in the state. Included in the database would be reasons for termination as well as a list of teachers who resigned rather than be fired for sexual misconduct.”

Teaching Anatomy & Physiology on YouTube: Mrs. Reid, the Science G

I was searching YouTube when I came across a channel called Mrs. Reid, the Science G. From her About page: “Me and my sisters would remix songs when we were younger (waaay before YouTube), so it’s safe to say, I have had years of practice on how to create songs. As a science educator, I get to blend my two loves: music and education and I’m so EXCITED to share this journey with you!!!” I don’t know any of the music she’s redone because I’m old, but I did enjoy a remixed Cardi B called BODY PARTS AND BODY REGIONS; her music tends to focus on Anatomy & Physiology topics. She also has some A&P lectures available. Really good and recommended.

EdSurge: How to Use Podcasts in Teaching

EdSurge: How to Use Podcasts in Teaching. “Podcasting is an incredibly powerful and intimate medium. There’s an authenticity to it that is difficult to produce in any other communication channel. Alex Blumberg, the co-founder and CEO of Gimlet Media, a podcast network, shared about that kind of intimacy during a 2016 Podcast Movement talk: The Second Golden Age of Audio…. But educators don’t have to limit their use of podcasts to personal enrichment. There are plenty of ways to use podcasting to enhance our classes and enjoy them as learning communities, as well.”

Teaching Expertise: 38 Best Reading Websites for Kids

Teaching Expertise: 38 Best Reading Websites for Kids. “As a teacher, you want your students to be reading whenever possible. However, it can be difficult to provide hard copies of books to every student, especially when the kids in your class are most likely reading at a variety of levels. Thanks to modern technology, there are lots of websites that allow students to practice reading from anywhere, at their level, about almost any topic. Try some of the suggestions below to get your students practicing!” I wish there was more annotation for each site, but it’s a big list.

Maine Department of Education: Maine Organizations Launch New ‘Teach ME Outside’ Website for Educators

Maine Department of Education: Maine Organizations Launch New ‘Teach ME Outside’ Website for Educators. “A collaborative effort between three Maine organizations called ‘Teach ME Outside’ has recently launched a new website to provide support for Maine educators and community members interested in environmental and outdoor learning for all Maine youth. The site contains educational resources, upcoming training opportunities, and data from across the state. Also featured on the website is the brand new Maine Environmental Education and Outdoor Learning Resource Directory, a dynamic and searchable map and tool that parents, educators, and community members can use to discover and connect with environmental and outdoor learning partners in their area.”

The Guardian: Work pressure in Covid lockdown was shattering, say teachers

The Guardian: Work pressure in Covid lockdown was shattering, say teachers. “One in four teachers who answered questions about their mental wellbeing told the NASUWT union that they had needed to see a doctor or other medical professional because of the pandemic’s impact, with many undergoing counselling or taking antidepressants. A small number of the 4,700 members who replied said they had self-harmed within the last 12 months as a result of their work. Others reported that their relationships had broken down during the pandemic, and nearly one in three said they had increased their alcohol consumption as a means to cope with their job.”

New York Times: Why Child Care Staff Had to Show Up While Teachers Worked Remotely

New York Times: Why Child Care Staff Had to Show Up While Teachers Worked Remotely. “Over the last year, some educators, school officials and teachers’ union leaders in New York and across the country have declared that teachers are not babysitters, and that schools are not child care centers. The sentiment has been meant to convince the public that teachers should not be responsible for supervising children just so that parents can return to work. But while some educators have been able to work from home for much, if not all, of the pandemic, child care centers have emerged as substitute schools for many thousands of American children for whom online learning is not an option.”

A ‘daunting, dark and difficult’ time: How a Brooklyn school moved forward after losing its leader to COVID (Chalkbeat)

Chalkbeat: A ‘daunting, dark and difficult’ time: How a Brooklyn school moved forward after losing its leader to COVID. “For many students at the school, [Dez-Ann] Romain was the first educator they felt they could trust, and she deployed a mix of support and tough love. One former student said she counseled him after he broke down in tears over a failed Regents exit exam and let him walk at graduation anyway. (He eventually passed the exam.) Sometimes, she challenged basketball players to pushups if they were goofing around in the hallway instead of heading to class, Musole said. But just days after city officials shuttered school buildings citywide in March due to surging coronavirus infections, Brooklyn Democracy Academy suffered a devastating blow: Romain was dead.”

‘It’s Patchwork’: Rural Teachers Struggle to Connect in Pandemic (Route Fifty)

Route Fifty: ‘It’s Patchwork’: Rural Teachers Struggle to Connect in Pandemic. “Nearly a year after COVID-19 upended schools, many rural educators still struggle to reach and engage with students. Teachers say they worry about the mental health and well-being of the students they can’t see. And students miss deadlines and the chance to forge relationships with their peers, threatening both their academic achievement and social development.”

IndyStar: Teachers in Indiana of any age can be vaccinated through federal pharmacy program

IndyStar: Teachers in Indiana of any age can be vaccinated through federal pharmacy program. “Gov. Eric Holcomb said Hoosier teachers of all ages will be eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine through the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program. Even though the state eligibility has only opened to residents age 50 and older, all teachers can make appointments and get vaccinated through those pharmacies participating in the federal program. Holcomb said the White House will provide additional doses to those pharmacies for the prioritization of teachers.”

Larry Ferlazzo: The Best Face Masks For Teachers In The Classroom (Or, At Least, The Most Comfortable Ones)

Larry Ferlazzo: The Best Face Masks For Teachers In The Classroom (Or, At Least, The Most Comfortable Ones). “As regular readers know, our district, like many urban districts around the United States, will be returning to our physical classrooms soon. One of my concerns has been finding a face mask that will be comfortable to wear for hours at a time. So, I sent out this tweet today asking for advice.”

News4Jax: CVS offering virus vaccine to Florida teachers under 50

News4Jax: CVS offering virus vaccine to Florida teachers under 50. “The CVS Pharmacy chain is vaccinating Florida teachers under age 50, circumventing state orders that continue to limit coronavirus inoculations to those over that age. The chain also began vaccinating day care and preschool teachers Wednesday, even though Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has not yet opened the vaccination program to them.”

Poynter: Remote teaching has meant lots more improvising — even for improv professors

Poynter: Remote teaching has meant lots more improvising — even for improv professors. “Whether through formal training or simply a dawning awareness, many instructors say they are thinking more deeply about learning and student centeredness. As students increasingly express concerns about their own mental and emotional health during 2020’s pandemic, economic downturn and racial reckoning, instructors are finding new ways to be flexible. They are grappling with how to balance their expanded role — teacher, mentor, friend — with conveying content, and where to draw the lines among these roles.”