Cornell Chronicle: Freedom on the Move digital archive adds K-12 lessons

Cornell Chronicle: Freedom on the Move digital archive adds K-12 lessons. “The Freedom on the Move project, an online collection devoted to fugitives from slavery in 19th century North America, has developed a series of lesson plans to make its crowdsourced database accessible to K-12 teachers and their students.”

Penn State News: New website helps K-12 teachers tackle remote learning

Penn State News: New website helps K-12 teachers tackle remote learning. “The K-12 Media Repository provides a comprehensive list of links to educational resources that provide information on varied topics related to online education. The posts are organized into categories such as individual grade levels (K-2, 3-5, 6-8 and 9-12), early childhood education, family literacy, special education, and technology tools for teaching.”

Learning about artificial intelligence: A hub of MIT resources for K-12 students (MIT News)

MIT News: Learning about artificial intelligence: A hub of MIT resources for K-12 students. “In light of the recent events surrounding Covid-19, learning for grades K-12 looks very different than it did a month ago. Parents and educators may be feeling overwhelmed about turning their homes into classrooms. With that in mind, a team led by Media Lab Associate Professor Cynthia Breazeal has launched aieducation.mit.edu to share a variety of online activities for K-12 students to learn about artificial intelligence, with a focus on how to design and use it responsibly.”

Coronavirus: Database launched to help theatremakers share skills (The Stage)

The Stage: Coronavirus: Database launched to help theatremakers share skills. “A skills-sharing database for theatre has been set up to help artists and organisations create work during lockdown. Set up this week, the database already includes nearly 200 individual offers to help in areas including producing and administration, dramaturgy, marketing and mentoring.”

TechCrunch: Duolingo’s new app teaches children how to read and write

TechCrunch: Duolingo’s new app teaches children how to read and write. “Until now, Duolingo‘s focus was always squarely on teaching languages, but today, the company launched Duolingo ABC, a free English literacy app for children ages 3 to 6. Originally, the company had planned on unveiling this app later in the year, but due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it decided to launch it early to help parents who are now suddenly finding themselves homeschooling their children.”

MCN: The Ultimate Guide to Virtual Museum Resources, E-Learning, and Online Collections

MCN: The Ultimate Guide to Virtual Museum Resources, E-Learning, and Online Collections. “If you’re a museum tech enthusiast looking to be part of the conversation, join one of MCN’s Special Interest Groups (SIGs). They are currently free for non-members so more can share resources during the COVID-19 pandemic. This list will be continually updated with examples of museum and museum-adjacent virtual awesomeness. It is by no means exhaustive.” It sure isn’t. Also there isn’t any annotation. But it’s a big ol’ list if you want to go exploring.

TIME: Time for Kids Launches Free Digital Library for Those Affected Globally by School Closures During the Coronavirus Pandemic

TIME: Time for Kids Launches Free Digital Library for Those Affected Globally by School Closures During the Coronavirus Pandemic. “TIME for Kids, the school-based publication that has provided quality, trusted journalism to millions of students in elementary classrooms for 25 years, announced today that it will bring TIME for Kids to homes for the first time. As families, teachers and students adjust to school closures as a result of the global spread of COVID-19, the new TIME for Kids digital library will provide access to new issues of TIME for Kids and Your $, the financial literacy magazine for kids, each week. TIME for Kids will also make available a complete library of previously published editions from 2020 along with additional educational resources and activities.”

EdScoop: New website indexes free edtech resources during health crisis

EdScoop: New website indexes free edtech resources during health crisis. “To support the continuity of education for students who can no longer attend classes due to the spread of COVID-19, technology companies have built a repository of free services available to teachers and students during the heath crisis, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy announced Wednesday.”

BusinessWire: Epic Announces Free Support for Educators, Students and Families Impacted by COVID-19 School Closures (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Epic Announces Free Support for Educators, Students and Families Impacted by COVID-19 School Closures (PRESS RELEASE). “In an effort to support educators, families and students impacted during COVID-19 school closures around the world, Epic today announced that they are providing all educators and librarians the ability to offer students remote access to the platform for FREE through the end of the school year, June 30, 2020, with no credit card required. Epic—the leading digital playground built for unmatched safety, discoverability and fun, reaching 20 million kids—is committed to empowering teachers across the globe with the opportunity to keep students reading and learning remotely during these uncertain times.”

Publishers Weekly: How Kids’ Lit Is Responding to the Coronavirus

Publishers Weekly: How Kids’ Lit Is Responding to the Coronavirus. “With widespread school and library closures due to the new coronavirus outbreak, children’s authors and publishers are going digital to provide kids with ways to read, draw, engage, and support other children who might need a helping hand. PW is tracking some of the most exciting efforts on social media and across the web, and will be updating our list regularly.”

PopSugar: 36 Free Educational Websites Parents Can Access While Schools Are Closed

PopSugar: 36 Free Educational Websites Parents Can Access While Schools Are Closed. “With a lot of schools shut down for the foreseeable future due to the coronavirus outbreak, many parents are finding themselves at home trying to juggle their jobs with raising their kids, which for now includes providing education as well. Although many teachers have sent home work so kids don’t fall behind and some schools are conducting classes online, there’s also a slew of free educational websites and apps at parents’ disposal.”

Chambanamoms: 300+ Resources to Keep Kids Entertained and Learning – Online and Off

Chambanamoms: 300+ Resources to Keep Kids Entertained and Learning – Online and Off. “Some of them are explicitly learning tools or curricula; others are more along the lines of educational entertainment. (Since we have not personally vetted each resource, the boundary separating learning from entertainment can be pretty difficult to pin down.) We’ve included separate categories for toddler specific activities, for middle/high school audiences, for non-screen indoor activities, for therapy resources, and even a whole category just for online tours. And our final category will help kids get moving while they are stuck indoors (or even outdoors).” Extensive, growing list with tons of stuff I haven’t seen anywhere else. Good.

WAFF: Scholastic creates free, digital hub for students disrupted by coronavirus

WAFF: Scholastic creates free, digital hub for students disrupted by coronavirus . “As school closures increase nationwide due to the spread of coronavirus, there is an unprecedented need for supporting our teachers, children, and families in learning. Scholastic has curated a free digital learning hub designed to support virtual learning plans: Scholastic Learn At Home allows open access to daily learning journeys divided into four grade spans—Pre-K–K, Grades 1–2, Grades 3–5, and Grades 6–9+, covering ELA, STEM, Science, Social Studies, and Social-Emotional Learning.”

Amazing Educational Resources: Educational Companies Offering Free Subscriptions due to School Closings

It started off as a Google Sheet and then it moved to its own domain because it got really, really big: Amazing Educational Resources. It’s described on the front page as “Education Companies Offering Free Subscriptions due to School Closings (Updated) : Amazing Educational Resources.” There are also links to a Facebook support group.