CNBC: Google employees to launch social media campaign on sexual harassment policies after previous protests brought ‘no meaningful gains for worker equity’

CNBC: Google employees to launch social media campaign on sexual harassment policies after previous protests brought ‘no meaningful gains for worker equity’. “Google employees, who walked out of offices around the world in November in protest of sexual harassment policies, are extending their critiques to the rest of the industry. The organizers are launching a social media campaign Tuesday to educate the public and protest the issue of forced arbitration by tech companies.”

Fast Company: How Microsoft has (so far) avoided tough scrutiny over privacy issues

Fast Company: How Microsoft has (so far) avoided tough scrutiny over privacy issues. “Quietly but confidently, Microsoft is back. For the first time in almost a decade, it’s the most valuable company in the world while its archrival Apple stumbles. It’s been lauded for its smart pivot into AI and cloud services in recent years and its acquisition of the popular GitHub software development platform. And it’s almost completely avoided the privacy debacles and questions about monopolistic tendencies that have dogged Facebook, Google, and Amazon, which have resulted in those companies facing negative headlines on a daily basis, nasty lawsuits, and their top executives being grilled in U.S. Congress.”

Reuters: Social media giants plan push-back on India’s new regulations – sources

Reuters: Social media giants plan push-back on India’s new regulations – sources. “Global social media and technology giants are gearing up to fight sweeping new rules proposed by the Indian government that would require them to actively regulate content in one of the world’s biggest Internet markets, sources close to the matter told Reuters.”

They’re dead to us: The Ars Technica 2019 Deathwatch (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: They’re dead to us: The Ars Technica 2019 Deathwatch. “If you’re stumbling across Ars’ Deathwatch for the first time, this is not a prediction of the actual demise of companies or technologies. It takes a lot to actually erase a company or a technology from the face of the Earth these days. Even the worst ideas and businesses often linger on through inertia or get absorbed by some other company and metastasize in new and horrific ways—for example, Yahoo. (We’ll get to them soon enough.)”

Digital Trends Live: Everything to expect from CES 2019 (Digital Trends)

Digital Trends: Digital Trends Live: Everything to expect from CES 2019 . This is mostly a video, but does have a good-sized article attached to it. “The latest episode of Digital Trends Live, DT’s live morning show, is the last one before CES, the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, and Digital Trends Live hosts Greg Nibler and Caleb Denison spent it previewing the many of the things we expect to see on the show floor.”

CNN: The case for why Big Tech is violating antitrust laws

CNN: The case for why Big Tech is violating antitrust laws. “Big Tech is behaving badly. And I’m not talking about Facebook handing over your personal data to the highest bidder or Amazon playing puppeteer in its HQ2 charade. Big Tech is violating the Sherman Act of 1890. If you think an antitrust law passed over a century ago couldn’t possibly address the problems of the digital era, you’re wrong. Much like our Constitution, the Sherman Act was written broadly enough to handle whatever the future might hold.”

Engadget: Google wins FCC approval to keep developing radar-based hand sensor

Engadget: Google wins FCC approval to keep developing radar-based hand sensor. “Google’s Advanced Technology and Projects (ATAP) team has been working on Project Soli since 2015. The gesture-based system uses broad beam radar to detect and capture hand movements, turning them into commands for mobile devices. Until now, though, the tech has been restricted, with some companies — including Facebook — claiming that the high frequency levels required might interfere with existing technology. Now, the FCC has granted a waiver that will allow Soli to operate at higher levels than currently allowed, and therefore continue development as Google originally intended.”