The Register: Girls Who Code book series banned in some US classrooms

The Register: Girls Who Code book series banned in some US classrooms . “The Girls Who Code series is a mashup of The Babysitters Club and Computer Science 101. A group of four or five (depending which book in the series you are on) diverse tween girls navigate friendship, life, coding and hackathons while the authors drop some code fragments into the storyline. It’s the type of stuff parents buy their kids in hopes of making IT seem cool. But apparently not everyone found it aspirational.”

Wall Street Journal: Battlefield Hotlines Let U.S. Military Keep Ukraine’s Weapons Firing

Wall Street Journal: Battlefield Hotlines Let U.S. Military Keep Ukraine’s Weapons Firing. “Near where weapons and equipment donated by the U.S. and other allies cross the border into Ukraine, a group of 55 U.S. troops and translators on iPads fielded repair queries about weapons that are already on the battlefield, via secure chat apps. There are 14 chats for each major weapon system, forming a makeshift wartime telemaintenance network for fighters who are using weapons well beyond the limits for which they were designed.”

Vanity Fair: Darth Vader’s Voice Emanated From War-Torn Ukraine

Vanity Fair: Darth Vader’s Voice Emanated From War-Torn Ukraine. “Bogdan Belyaev was working from home when the air raid sirens went off. They hadn’t been heard in the city of Lviv since World War II, but it was February 24, and Russia had just invaded Ukraine…. But for Belyaev, work carried on because he needed it to. People on the other side of the world were relying on him, and the project was the culmination of a passion he’d had since childhood: Star Wars.”

CyberScoop: Commerce lacks intelligence resources to keep U.S. tech from fueling Chinese cyberthreat, experts warn

CyberScoop: Commerce lacks intelligence resources to keep U.S. tech from fueling Chinese cyberthreat, experts warn. “The Commerce Department unit that approves sensitive U.S. technology exports does not have the intelligence resources to fully realize the national security consequences of selling advanced equipment and software to China, several experts and a former agency official told CyberScoop.”

Business Insider: Russia will be using second-grade tech for years and spending ‘huge resources’ to recreate what already exists, says a former top Russian finance official

Business Insider: Russia will be using second-grade tech for years and spending ‘huge resources’ to recreate what already exists, says a former top Russian finance official. “Russia could be in for years of decline in technology development due to sweeping sanctions over the Ukraine war, Oleg Vyugin, a former high-level finance ministry and central bank official, told Reuters in an interview on Tuesday. That’s because when it comes to tech, Russia relies on imports, and imports have been hit by sanctions and boycotts. As a result, the country will have to develop its own products to substitute those imports.”

India is building a database for companies to train AI models: Rajeev Chandrasekhar (Mint)

Mint: India is building a database for companies to train AI models: Rajeev Chandrasekhar. “India is building a large database of anonymized non-personal data for Indian companies and startups that are using artificial intelligence (AI), said Rajeev Chandrasekhar, minister of state (MoS) for Electronics and Information Technology, at the Global Fintech Fest (GFF), an industry event, held in Mumbai on Wednesday.”

ZDNet: Google partners with the US government to supply chips and spur innovation

ZDNet: Google partners with the US government to supply chips and spur innovation. “Chips used to develop new nanotechnology and semiconductor devices oftentimes have a large price tag, posing a big obstacle for innovation. To solve this issue, the US Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has signed a cooperative research and development agreement with Google to develop and produce these chips.”

The chips are down: Putin scrambles for high-tech parts as his arsenal goes up in smoke (Politico)

Politico: The chips are down: Putin scrambles for high-tech parts as his arsenal goes up in smoke. “Kyiv is acutely aware that the outcome of the war is likely to hinge on whether Russia finds a way to regain access to high-tech chips, and is out to ensure it doesn’t get them. In order to flag the danger, Ukraine is sending out international warnings that the Kremlin has drawn up shopping lists of semiconductors, transformers, connectors, casings, transistors, insulators and other components, most made by companies in the U.S., Germany, the Netherlands, the U.K., Taiwan and Japan, among others, which it needs to fuel its war effort.”

Motherboard: Kaspersky Employees Say They Were Asked to Resign Because They Wanted To Leave Russia

Motherboard: Kaspersky Employees Say They Were Asked to Resign Because They Wanted To Leave Russia . “In the wake of the invasion, at least two employees told Motherboard they asked to be relocated outside of Russia. A third source who still works at the company also told Motherboard that some Kaspersky employees were asked to resign after those employees asked to live and work somewhere else.”

New York Times: Inside Ukraine’s Thriving Tech Sector

New York Times: Inside Ukraine’s Thriving Tech Sector. “The hassles never end for Yuriy Adamchuk, a Ukrainian executive who spends most of his waking hours coaxing 3,000 software coders to deliver projects on time, despite the obstacles and occasional horrors of war and a never-ending series of interruptions. Sitting in his office, he starts to elaborate, then is interrupted. The sounds of air raid sirens fill the streets of this historic, elegant city and an automated voice is heard, from loudspeakers in all directions, urging citizens to head to the nearest bomb shelter.”

New York Times: The Tech Magic That Unleashed Your Best

New York Times: The Tech Magic That Unleashed Your Best. “Last week, our On Tech editor, Hanna Ingber, shared a story of her kiddo stumbling upon a design app that unlocked his amazing taste for interiors. We asked for your own tales of surprising ways in which technology helped you unleash creativity or discover new joys. You guys (sniff), the responses were lovely. We’re sharing a selection of them today.”

New York Times: 3-D Printing Grows Beyond Its Novelty Roots

New York Times: 3-D Printing Grows Beyond Its Novelty Roots. “The 3-D-printing foundry in Devens, Mass., about 40 miles northwest of Boston, is owned by VulcanForms, a start-up that came out of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. It has raised $355 million in venture funding. And its work force has jumped sixfold in the past year to 360, with recruits from major manufacturers like General Electric and Pratt & Whitney and tech companies including Google and Autodesk.”

Tech Xplore: A model for the automatic extraction of content from webs and apps

Tech Xplore: A model for the automatic extraction of content from webs and apps. “Content management systems or CMSs are the most popular tool for creating content on the internet. In recent years, they have evolved to become the backbone of an increasingly complex ecosystem of websites, mobile apps and platforms. In order to simplify processes, a team of researchers from the Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (IN3) at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) has developed an open-source model to automate the extraction of content from CMSs.”

Chemical & Engineering News: New database on university spinouts highlights dissatisfaction

Chemical & Engineering News: New database on university spinouts highlights dissatisfaction. “A new open source database on university technology spinouts, also referred to as spin-offs, detailing terms negotiated between academic institutions and research entrepreneurs indicates a high level of dissatisfaction among company founders, especially those spinning out of universities in the UK.”