A Brief History of Computing and the Web: From 17th Century Computers to Today’s Digital Empires (Interesting Engineering)

Interesting Engineering: A Brief History of Computing and the Web: From 17th Century Computers to Today’s Digital Empires. “Today, most of us depend heavily on the Internet, for everything from work, to managing our finances, answering correspondences, or our social lives. The applications of the web are both endless and vital to modern life. While many of us have been online since the 1990s, the history of computing stretches back even far further – and after all, without computing, there can be no web. In fact, the first primitive computing devices were conceived as long ago as the 17th Century, with the earliest concepts for programmable computers emerging in the mid-19th Century.” Extensive article, chockablock with links.

World Economic Forum: Estonia built one of the world’s most advanced digital societies. During COVID-19, that became a lifeline.

World Economic Forum: Estonia built one of the world’s most advanced digital societies. During COVID-19, that became a lifeline.. “In early March, Estonia declared a state of emergency, closed its borders and entered a full lockdown to stop the spread of COVID-19. But while other countries scrambled to deal with school closures and the disruption to vital services, Estonia simply continued to use the thriving, resilient digital infrastructure it had spent decades developing. Digital classrooms, online teaching materials and a huge range of online public services were already in place. Even more crucially, Estonians knew how to access and use them.”

CNET: Why tech made racial injustice worse, and how to fix it

CNET: Why tech made racial injustice worse, and how to fix it. “As part of CNET’s Now What series, we explore the impact of tech on race relations with Ruha Benjamin, professor of African American studies at Princeton University and author of the book Race After Technology. Benjamin is a sociologist focused on technology and she brings a unique perspective on the impact of technology on race relations.”

Middle East: Web-chat services unblocked but big tech projects take a hit in COVID crisis (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Middle East: Web-chat services unblocked but big tech projects take a hit in COVID crisis. “Businesses and societies around the world have been hit hard by the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. But what has been the specific impact on tech use and adoption in a region as diverse as the Middle East?”

BetaNews: How COVID-19 sparked a revolution in healthcare machine learning and AI

BetaNews: How COVID-19 sparked a revolution in healthcare machine learning and AI. “As with nearly every element of the healthcare system, applications of machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) have also been transformed by the pandemic. Although the power of machine learning and AI was being put to significant use prior to the Coronavirus outbreak, there is now increased pressure to understand the underlying patterns to help us prepare for any epidemic that might hit the world in the future.”

ITPro Today: Meet the Groundswell of Open Source COVID-19 Efforts

ITPro Today: Meet the Groundswell of Open Source COVID-19 Efforts. “Open source communities around the world have been on the forefront of assisting medical researchers, health care professionals and government health agencies with research on the coronavirus responsible for the rapid spread of COVID-19 around the world.”

BetaNews: Data privacy and identity in the age of COVID-19

BetaNews: Data privacy and identity in the age of COVID-19. “With governments around the world rolling out contact tracing in order to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, access management company Okta has commissioned a survey of 12,000 people across six counties to discover how consumers feel about data privacy and identity. It finds that 84 percent of Americans are worried that data collection for COVID-19 containment will sacrifice too much of their privacy. A majority say they are uncomfortable with personally identifiable information (67 percent), bluetooth data (57 percent), medical data (53 percent), and location data (52 percent) being collected for COVID-19 purposes.”

CNN: Why conspiracy theorists think 5G is bad for your health and why experts say not to worry

CNN: Why conspiracy theorists think 5G is bad for your health and why experts say not to worry. “…concerns about 5G’s effects on health were spreading even before coronavirus. Experts say these fears, too, are unfounded. ‘Is there anything to worry about? The short answer is no,’ said Chris Collins, a professor and research director in the radiology department at the New York University School of Medicine.”

Poynter: Here are 30+ tools, tips and resources for journalists to try this summer

Poynter: Here are 30+ tools, tips and resources for journalists to try this summer. “Welcome! This is Jeremy Caplan writing. I’m helping out this week with some new tools and tips. I’m director of teaching and learning for CUNY’s Newmark Grad School of Journalism in New York City and a former Time reporter. I’m constantly exploring new stuff and I write about the most useful tools I find in a new mini newsletter called Wonder Tools.” A lot of these tools look fun for anybody, to be honest.

SiliconANGLE: Seven technologies and trends the COVID-19 pandemic will accelerate

SiliconANGLE: Seven technologies and trends the COVID-19 pandemic will accelerate. “It’s well-understood that cloud and conferencing platforms will be the big winners coming out of the pandemic, but more subtle changes are lurking as well. SiliconANGLE asked executives from a variety of technology companies what other trends and technologies are likely to be forever transformed by the events of recent months. Here are a few they identified that are not making headlines – yet.”

The Register: COVID-19 sparks new wearables to push the pandemic away

The Register: COVID-19 sparks new wearables to push the pandemic away. “COVID-19 is spurring new types of wearable hardware. Exhibit A: a startup named Nodle has cooked up a ‘smart wearable’ that bakes the third-party contact-tracing the ‘Whisper tracing protocol’ and Bluetooth into a device said to be wearable as a necklace or clipped onto your garments.”

Computerworld: The coronavirus is revealing our technology blunders

Computerworld: The coronavirus is revealing our technology blunders. “With the United States leading the world both in total number of COVID-19 diagnoses and total number of deaths related to the virus, a lot of people have been asking how the richest country in the world could do so poorly in dealing with a pandemic. We might also be asking how the most technologically advanced country in the world can be so technologically backwards in some ways.”

NoCamels: New ‘CoronaTech’ Portal Explores Virus-Related Innovation In Israel

NoCamels: New ‘CoronaTech’ Portal Explores Virus-Related Innovation In Israel. “….the site offers information about technological developments from Israel and abroad, open calls by healthcare providers, organizations, and corporations, proposals, and opportunities for cross-border collaborations, access to international grants, insights and analyses by Israeli experts and entrepreneurs, and an up-to-date dashboard to find potential technologies and solutions. It also includes information on online webinars, conferences, and hackathon.”

Carnegie Mellon University: Leading AI Scholars Featured in New Oral Archive

Carnegie Mellon University: Leading AI Scholars Featured in New Oral Archive. “[Illah] Nourbakhsh and [Jennifer] Keating have captured the thoughts of some leading AI scholars in a new oral archive that became available online this year. It includes video and transcripts from 22 people, including MIT’s Daniela Rus, Harvard University’s Barbara Grosz and Microsoft’s Eric Horvitz, as well as a number of CMU faculty members such as Martial Hebert, David Danks, Mark Kamlet, Tuomas Sandholm and Jim Herbsleb.”