Phys .org: Seniors struggle with technology, and often their kids won’t help

Phys .org: Seniors struggle with technology, and often their kids won’t help. “Many seniors who struggled with digital devices felt they lacked support. In particular, they said their own families often displayed a ‘can’t be bothered explaining’ attitude. Unsurprisingly, this attitude is very unhelpful. There is plenty all of us can do to help the seniors in our lives get connected.”

Ars Technica: Nobody can see all of CES. But I tried

Ars Technica: Nobody can see all of CES. But I tried. “One of the things any CES veteran will tell you is that it’s impossible to actually see all of CES. They’re not kidding—it would be an overstatement to claim that CES takes over the entirety of Las Vegas, but it wouldn’t be an egregious one. Parts of CES take place at the Venetian hotel/casino/indoor mall, the attached and similarly gargantuan Palazzo, and the Las Vegas Convention Center. Any one of those locations dwarfs any other convention center I’ve seen, but even all of them together aren’t enough to entirely contain CES—which also has offshoots in other area hotels, convention centers, and just about anywhere else you can cram a few hundred people.”

University of Oregon: Urbanism Next launches the NEXUS online clearinghouse

University of Oregon: Urbanism Next launches the NEXUS online clearinghouse. “Created by the UO’s Urbanism Next Center in partnership with NUMO Alliance, NEXUS is a comprehensive, vetted source of information that explores the potential effects of innovations such as new mobility, autonomous vehicles and the rise of e-commerce. Going beyond the technologies themselves, NEXUS sheds light on possible long-term and compounding influences of these technologies on cities and communities.”

CNN: Nanobots, ape chauffeurs and flights to Pluto. The predictions for 2020 we got horribly wrong

CNN: Nanobots, ape chauffeurs and flights to Pluto. The predictions for 2020 we got horribly wrong. “History is littered with predictions and future projections. Many of these are given with supreme confidence, before they fade conveniently into insignificance as they whiz wide off the mark. But as we charge into the third decade of the 21st century, it’s time to ask: Where did we think we’d be in 2020?”

The tech we lost in 2019: RIP iTunes, MoviePass, and AirPower (Mashable)

Mashable: The tech we lost in 2019: RIP iTunes, MoviePass, and AirPower. “From folding phones to more wireless earbuds than we can name, there was a lot of new tech we fell in love with in 2019. But for every eye-popping new gadget we tried, there was another one that never made it. From Apple toys that once had so much promise (AirPower! 12-inch MacBook!), to those that were probably doomed from the start (MoviePass, Coolest Cooler), this is our annual reminder that no product or service can sustain itself on hype alone.”

PRNewswire: IEEE Computer Society’s Top 12 Technology Trends for 2020

PRNewswire: IEEE Computer Society’s Top 12 Technology Trends for 2020 (PRESS RELEASE). “IEEE Computer Society (IEEE CS) tech experts unveil their annual predictions for the future of tech, presenting what they believe will be the most widely adopted technology trends in 2020. Six of the top 12 technology predictions have been developed into peer-reviewed articles published in Computer magazine’s December issue, covering topics that include cognitive robotics, practical drone delivery, and digital twins. The tech future forecast by the world’s premier organization of computer professionals consistently ranks as one of its most anticipated announcements.”

Wired: The WIRED Guide to 5G

Wired: The WIRED Guide to 5G. “5G isn’t a single technology or standard, but rather a constellation of different technologies, and deploying them could require a radically different approach than building 4G networks. Carriers have launched demos and pilot programs that demonstrate big leaps in wireless performance, but mobile networks based on the ‘millimeter-wave’ technology that may deliver the fastest speeds probably won’t be widely available for years.”