Hitting the Books: The Second Kind of Impossible (Engadget)

Engadget: Hitting the Books: The Second Kind of Impossible. “Welcome, dear readers, to Engadget’s new series, Hitting the Books. With less than one in five Americans reading just for fun these days, we’ve done the hard work for you by scouring the internet for the most interesting, thought provoking books on science and technology we can find and delivering an easily digestible nugget of their stories.”

Journal of Blacks in Higher Education: Thomas Edison State University Launches the Journal of Women and Minorities in Technology

Journal of Blacks in Higher Education: Thomas Edison State University Launches the Journal of Women and Minorities in Technology . “The new publication will be an open access journal that provides quality peer-reviewed articles written by academics and professionals in the fields of aviation, nuclear technology, cybersecurity, and information technology. The articles will provide technical and soft-skills information needed to excel in the field of technology, with an emphasis on women, African Americans, and other professionals from underrepresented groups.”

The Guardian: Memes, technology and sci-fi: what to expect from art in the US in 2019

The Guardian: Memes, technology and sci-fi: what to expect from art in the US in 2019. “With our dependency on smartphones, our Netflix addictions and with almost half the country on dating apps, our devices are becoming dangerously inseparable from our everyday lives. From surveillance to selfie vanity and memes, a series of technology-themed exhibits are coming to the US next year, which trace the evolution of photography, show the roots of social media and share how technology can actually be a force for good.”

BBC: What is ‘primitive technology’ and why do we love it?

BBC: What is ‘primitive technology’ and why do we love it?. “‘Hi guys, welcome to my YouTube channel. Make sure you like and subscribe.’ This is the familiar opening patter of hundreds of fresh-faced YouTubers waving down the camera to their legions of fans. However, in an altogether quieter corner of the site, millions of people are watching a silent man banging rocks and sticks together. Welcome to the world of primitive technology videos.”

Benedict Evans: Ways to think about machine learning

Benedict Evans: Ways to think about machine learning. “We’re now four or five years into the current explosion of machine learning, and pretty much everyone has heard of it. It’s not just that startups are forming every day or that the big tech platform companies are rebuilding themselves around it – everyone outside tech has read the Economist or BusinessWeek cover story, and many big companies have some projects underway. We know this is a Next Big Thing.”

Forbes: Want To Know What Technologies Are Coming In The Future? There’s a Database For That

Forbes: Want To Know What Technologies Are Coming In The Future? There’s a Database For That . “Spider silk transformed into fiber for tissue reconstruction; paper that conducts electricity; renewable diesel fuel; and new techniques for regenerating aging or diseased skin. These are just a handful of examples from a new database of over 1,300 new technologies currently making their way through Israeli Technology Transfer Organizations [TTOs] associated with universities, research institutes, and medical institutions.”

MIT Technology Review: The Internet Doesn’t Have to Be Bad for Democracy

MIT Technology Review: The Internet Doesn’t Have to Be Bad for Democracy. “Tiny, largely self-funded U.S. startup Pol.is has been working on a similar project longer than Zuckerberg and already has some promising results. The company’s interactive, crowdsourced survey tool can be used to generate maps of public opinion that help citizens, governments, and legislators discover the nuances of agreement and disagreement on contentious issues that exist. In 2016, that information helped the government of Taiwan break a six-year deadlock over how to regulate online alcohol sales, caused by entrenched, opposing views among citizens on what rules should apply.”