University of Glasgow: Psychologists Develop First Measure Of Social Media Impact On Teen Sleep

University of Glasgow: Psychologists Develop First Measure Of Social Media Impact On Teen Sleep. “The University of Glasgow researchers who developed the Index of Nighttime Offline Distress, or iNOD, believe it is the first psychological measurement tool of its kind, which reflects the realities of how young people interact with each other in an online world. The 10-point questionnaire, developed after consultation with more than 3,000 young people, aims to equip clinicians, teachers and parents with accurate measurements of the impact of late-night social media use on sleep.”

NBC 5 : ‘Black voices of Vermont’ aims to build community and promote learning

NBC 5: ‘Black voices of Vermont’ aims to build community and promote learning. “A new project in Vermont aims to amplify voices of Black youth and strengthen a sense of community. ‘We’re getting progressively better over time,’ Yeshua Armbrister, 19, said of Vermont communities’ goal of being ever more inclusive. Armbrister is one of the first participants in Black Voices of Vermont, a new, interactive media project focused on highlighting the experiences and viewpoints of Black teens in the predominantly white state.”

Mashable: Meet the chatbot that simulates a teen experiencing a mental health crisis

Mashable: Meet the chatbot that simulates a teen experiencing a mental health crisis. “In digital conversation, Riley is a young person who is trying to come out as genderqueer. When you message Riley, they’ll offer brief replies to open-ended questions, sprinkle ellipses throughout when saying something difficult, and type in lowercase, though they’ll capitalize a word or two for emphasis. Riley’s humanness is impressive given that they’re a chatbot driven by artificial intelligence to accomplish a unique goal: simulate what it’s like to talk to a young person in crisis so that volunteer counselors can become skilled at interacting with them and practice asking about thoughts of suicide.”

CNET: Tim Berners-Lee: One-third of youth still don’t have internet access as web turns 32

CNET: Tim Berners-Lee: One-third of youth still don’t have internet access as web turns 32. “As the web turns 32 on Friday, its creator is using his annual letter to draw attention to the way the digital divide affects young people worldwide. While you may assume that children now grow up as digital natives, web creator Tim Berners-Lee points to a 2020 report from the International Telecommunication Union, which notes that one-third of young people around the world don’t have access to the internet.”

Poynter: A year into the pandemic, MediaWise teen fact-checkers prepare to tackle COVID-19 misinformation on YouTube

Poynter: A year into the pandemic, MediaWise teen fact-checkers prepare to tackle COVID-19 misinformation on YouTube. “On Feb. 11, 2020, the MediaWise Teen Fact-Checking Network published its first fact-check about the coronavirus. The story, reported on by then-16-year-old Angie Li, detailed what we knew about the virus (at the time, very little), and gave tips on how not to fall for or share misinformation. Now a year into the pandemic, Li’s fact-check served as just a glimpse at the COVID-19 misinformation to come.”

Salt Lake Tribune: What can and can’t be learned from our new crowdfunded Utah teen treatment database

Salt Lake Tribune: What can and can’t be learned from our new crowdfunded Utah teen treatment database. “The teen treatment industry is bigger in Utah than anywhere else in the country. The Salt Lake Tribune and KUER released a database Thursday containing the past five years’ worth of inspection reports and confirmed investigations for every residential teen treatment program currently operating in the state. The Salt Lake Tribune’s Jessica Miller was the lead reporter on the database project. She sat down with KUER’s Caroline Ballard to talk about how it could be a resource for anyone considering a Utah program for a teenager.”

TIME: Insurance Claim Data Show How Much Teen Mental Health Has Suffered During the U.S. COVID-19 Pandemic

TIME: Insurance Claim Data Show How Much Teen Mental Health Has Suffered During the U.S. COVID-19 Pandemic. “In a new study by the nonprofit FAIR Health, investigators combed through a database of 32 billion U.S. health insurance claims—focusing on the two billion or so from 2019 to 2020—to calculate the numbers filed for health services in the pediatric age group, which they defined as ages 0 to 22. The researchers focused particularly on the emotionally turbulent years from 13 to 18, and to a somewhat lesser extent on claims filed by those ages 19 to 22. In both groups they found sharp spikes from pre-pandemic 2019 to 2020 in a range of psychological conditions including major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, adjustment disorder, self-harm, substance abuse, overdoses, OCD, ADHD and tic disorders.”

ABC 7: Teen, 14, helps hundreds secure COVID-19 vaccine appointments through his own database, ‘Chicago Vaccine Angels’

ABC 7: Teen, 14, helps hundreds secure COVID-19 vaccine appointments through his own database, ‘Chicago Vaccine Angels’. “For many people, the path to getting a COVID-19 vaccine is a long and winding road. But Benjamin Kagan of Chicago Vaccine Angels is taking the legwork out of it for those who don’t have the time, resources, or computer know-how to locate a dose. The 14-year-old tracks down where and when vaccines are available and makes appointments for people on a waiting list.”

CNET: Teens, social media use and mental health: What you really need to know

CNET: Teens, social media use and mental health: What you really need to know. “Last week, the UK’s Education Policy Institute and The Prince’s Trust published a study that linked heavy social media use to negative well-being and self-esteem in teens, especially among girls. The study was widely covered by the media, featuring alarming headlines about how social media use was causing the mental health of teenagers across the UK to spiral. The message relayed by news publications left little room for nuance. But when you dig a little deeper into the science of social media’s impact on well-being, the picture looks infinitely more murky.”

TechCrunch: TikTok is being used by vape sellers marketing to teens

TechCrunch: TikTok is being used by vape sellers marketing to teens. “Although a 2019 U.S. law made it illegal to sell or market e-cigarettes to anyone under the age of 21, TikTok videos featuring top brands of disposable e-cigarettes and vapes for sale have been relatively easy to find on the app. These videos, set to popular and upbeat music, clearly target a teenage customer base with offers of now-unauthorized cartridge flavors like fruit and mint in the form of a disposable vape. Some sellers even promote their ‘discreet’ packaging services, where the vapes they ship to customers can be hidden from parents’ prying eyes by being placed under the package’s stuffing or tucked inside other products, like makeup bags or fuzzy slippers.”

NBC News: Racism is rampant on Omegle. Teens are working to hold racist trolls accountable.

NBC News: Racism is rampant on Omegle. Teens are working to hold racist trolls accountable.. “Earlier this month, Hidaya Saban and Alees Elshiek opened the video chat website Omegle for what they described as a social experiment. Omegle, which has been around for approximately a decade, allows users to be paired with strangers in a video chat at random — although Saban, 19, and Elshiek, 18, said they entered the college student section of the site where they were able to pick certain topic tags in order to be paired with those who have similar interests.”

Daily Beast: There’s No End in Sight to ‘Mind Boggling’ Homecoming Dances

Daily Beast: There’s No End in Sight to ‘Mind Boggling’ Homecoming Dances. “In any other time, a lighthearted photo of teens pretending to lick one another’s faces would not warrant national headlines. But the Nov. 7 Facebook post—in which three glittering teenage girls wear crowns, smiles, and red roses between pubescent boys blowing them kisses—is emblematic of a catastrophic divide between Americans in the middle of a pandemic.”