Ubergizmo: Selfies Are Apparently Driving Cosmetic Surgery Requests

Ubergizmo: Selfies Are Apparently Driving Cosmetic Surgery Requests. “Thanks to apps like Snapchat and Instagram introducing various filters that we can apply during our selfies to make ourselves look silly, look beautiful, and so on, it seems to have created a side-effect which is that it is apparently driving requests from teens for cosmetic surgery that will make them look as good as their selfies.”

University of Southern California: Grandparents’ move to Facebook spurs both embarrassing ‘fails’ and opportunities

University of Southern California: Grandparents’ move to Facebook spurs both embarrassing ‘fails’ and opportunities. “Older Americans are the fastest-growing group to use Facebook, according to a Gallup poll released in April. More than half of those between ages 50 and 64 now have a Facebook page; in 2011, only about a third did. And about a third of people age 65 and older now use Facebook as well. As recently as three years ago, 71 percent of teens reported that they used Facebook, according to another study from the Pew Research Center, and that figure has now dropped to 51 percent. While the shifting user base and other factors have skewed Facebook older, many younger users still keep their Facebook pages. Recent data show that Facebook is more popular among lower-income youth. And sources such as Gallup indicate that numbers of college-age Facebook users are holding steady.”

The Atlantic: Teens Are Debating the News on Instagram

The Atlantic: Teens Are Debating the News on Instagram. “It’s harder and harder to have an honest debate on the internet. Social-media platforms like Twitter, Reddit, and Facebook Groups are rife with trolls; forums are plagued by archaic layouts and spambots. Teenagers who are looking to talk about big issues face additional frustrations, like the fact that most adults on these platforms don’t take them seriously. Naturally, they’ve turned to Instagram. Specifically, they’ve turned to ‘flop’ accounts—pages that are collectively managed by several teens, many of them devoted to discussions of hot-button topics: gun control, abortion, immigration, President Donald Trump, LGBTQ issues, YouTubers, breaking news, viral memes.”

WYTV: Recent study shows excessive social media could put users at risk for ADHD

WYTV: Recent study shows excessive social media could put users at risk for ADHD. “A new report shows that the more teenagers spend on social media, the more they could develop symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. The CDC says over 6 million kids have been diagnosed with ADHD and it’s more common in boys than girls.”

TechCrunch: Researchers find that filters don’t prevent porn

TechCrunch: Researchers find that filters don’t prevent porn . “In a paper entitled Internet Filtering and Adolescent Exposure to Online Sexual Material, Oxford Internet Institute researchers Victoria Nash and Andrew Przybylski found that Internet filters rarely work to keep adolescents away from online porn.”

PR Newswire: Gale Introduces New Digital Archive on Amateur Newspapers From the 19th Century (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Gale Introduces New Digital Archive on Amateur Newspapers From the 19th Century (PRESS RELEASE.) “Gale, a Cengage company, is introducing a new digital archive that’s considered the social media of the 19th century and gives students and researchers a unique inside look at how teens and young adults of the period expressed themselves and their opinions to the world. Amateur Newspapers from the American Antiquarian Society is the largest and most extensive digital archive in the U.S., providing authentic newspaper writings published by the younger generation of the 19th century. The archive gives an unprecedented look at how youth viewed themselves, their hometowns, the country and the world around them during the era, drawing researchers into the world of America’s first youth subcultures.”

US News & World Report: Data Obtained by AP Shows Social Media Alters Gang Life

US News & World Report: Data Obtained by AP Shows Social Media Alters Gang Life. “Gangs’ embrace of social media to goad foes or conceal drug dealing in emoji-laden text is the biggest change in how gangs operate compared with 10 years ago, according to new law enforcement data provided exclusively to The Associated Press ahead of its release Tuesday by the Chicago Crime Commission. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other sites have radically altered gang culture in Chicago. They are having a similar influence on gangs nationwide.”