PR Newswire: Gale Introduces New Digital Archive on Amateur Newspapers From the 19th Century (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Gale Introduces New Digital Archive on Amateur Newspapers From the 19th Century (PRESS RELEASE.) “Gale, a Cengage company, is introducing a new digital archive that’s considered the social media of the 19th century and gives students and researchers a unique inside look at how teens and young adults of the period expressed themselves and their opinions to the world. Amateur Newspapers from the American Antiquarian Society is the largest and most extensive digital archive in the U.S., providing authentic newspaper writings published by the younger generation of the 19th century. The archive gives an unprecedented look at how youth viewed themselves, their hometowns, the country and the world around them during the era, drawing researchers into the world of America’s first youth subcultures.”

US News & World Report: Data Obtained by AP Shows Social Media Alters Gang Life

US News & World Report: Data Obtained by AP Shows Social Media Alters Gang Life. “Gangs’ embrace of social media to goad foes or conceal drug dealing in emoji-laden text is the biggest change in how gangs operate compared with 10 years ago, according to new law enforcement data provided exclusively to The Associated Press ahead of its release Tuesday by the Chicago Crime Commission. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other sites have radically altered gang culture in Chicago. They are having a similar influence on gangs nationwide.”

The Atlantic: How Instagram Threads Became the WikiHow for Gen Z

The Atlantic: How Instagram Threads Became the WikiHow for Gen Z. “When Sophie, a 13-year-old in Arizona, began eighth grade last year, she wanted to start things off on the right foot. Instead of picking up the latest issue of Teen Vogue or googling around for advice, she reached for her phone and followed a slew of ‘thread’ accounts on Instagram.”

Youth Today: Every State’s Extended Foster Care Policies Now Available in New Database

Youth Today: Every State’s Extended Foster Care Policies Now Available in New Database. “The Juvenile Law Center released a new tool today that could help policymakers and advocates better understand and serve older youth — those over 18 — who are aging out of foster care. The National Extended Foster Care Review is a comprehensive database that catalogues each state’s laws and policies related to extended foster care.”

The Verge: YouTube is the preferred platform of today’s teens

The Verge: YouTube is the preferred platform of today’s teens. “Teenagers are more interested than ever in YouTube, home to the world’s growing influencer and vlogger base. According to a recent study conducted by Pew Research Center, 85 percent of teenagers (ages 13–17) say they use the platform. Closely behind are Instagram (72 percent) and Snapchat (69 percent).”

Study: Social Media Usage Linked to Underage Drinking (US News & World Report)

US News & World Report: Study: Social Media Usage Linked to Underage Drinking. “ALCOHOL-RELATED SOCIAL media posts appear to influence youth alcohol consumption, a new study says. The study, published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, examined associations between young adults’ drinking behavior and the photos and posts of alcohol-fueled parties and behaviors that fill their feeds on social media sites. Despite the pervasive use of social media among young adults, the study says, little is known about its effect on drinking patterns.”

Ubergizmo: Teen Monitoring App Accidentally Leaks Account Info Of Its Users

Ubergizmo: Teen Monitoring App Accidentally Leaks Account Info Of Its Users. “The app also bills itself as being a ‘secure’ monitoring app, although that seems rather ironic now because according to a report from ZDNet, the app has accidentally leaked thousands of its users’ account information, which includes Apple ID email addresses, the names of the device of its users (which in some cases were the names of the teens), its unique identifier, and even passwords which were stored in plaintext format.”