AdAge: Fortnite emerges as a social media platform for Gen Z

AdAge: Fortnite emerges as a social media platform for Gen Z. “Fortnite’s audience remains much smaller than Facebook and YouTube, which each have roughly 2 billion users. Still, the game isn’t that far off from Twitter and its 330 million members. And Fortnite enthusiasts are extremely loyal: Those between the ages of 10 to 17 and who play the game at least once a week spend 25 percent of all of their free time playing Fortnite, higher than any other form of entertainment, according to the NRG report.”

Poynter: We taught more than 5,500 teenagers fact-checking skills this week. Here’s what we learned.

Poynter: We taught more than 5,500 teenagers fact-checking skills this week. Here’s what we learned.. “Hey y’all, it’s Daniel. In this newsletter, we spend a lot of time reporting on and analyzing some of the internet’s biggest problems — and how fact-checkers do (or don’t) help solve them. But this week, I have some good news for you: The kids are alright.”

BBC: What to do if you see an Instagram post about suicide

BBC: What to do if you see an Instagram post about suicide. “Malaysian police say a 16-year-old girl killed herself earlier this week, after she asked her Instagram followers whether she should live or die. The Malaysian teenager had hosted a poll on her Instagram story, with the question: ‘Really Important, Help Me Choose D / L’, where D stood for death, while L stood for life, according to police. Some of her followers voted for ‘death’.”

Lifehacker: Learn New Teen Slang Through This Gen Z Glossary

Lifehacker: Learn New Teen Slang Through This Gen Z Glossary. “Oh, hello, there. I am just brushing up on my Gen Z vocabulary, thanks to this glossary shared on Twitter by a high school teacher named James Callahan. Apparently, he had been keeping a running spreadsheet of the new slang terms he would learn from his students. This week, a kid from his class tweeted screenshots of it, and then that tweet went viral, and then Callahan gave the world a gift by making the whole document public.”

Stanford University: Gang-associated youth avoid violence by acting tough online, Stanford sociologist finds

Stanford University: Gang-associated youth avoid violence by acting tough online, Stanford sociologist finds. “Through his role as the director of an afterschool youth violence prevention program on Chicago’s South Side, [Forrest] Stuart recruited 60 young men affiliated with five different gang factions for an in-depth study about urban gang violence in the digital age. For two years, he spent 20 to 50 hours a week conducting direct observations with these young men. In addition, he conducted in-depth interviews where he asked participants to review each day’s social media activity with him. During these debriefing sessions, Stuart asked about the origins, intent, meaning and consequences of their aggressive posts so he could better understand how their online activity compared with their offline behavior.”