CNBC: Google spins out secret hi-speed telecom project called Aalyria, and keeps stake in startup

CNBC: Google spins out secret hi-speed telecom project called Aalyria, and keeps stake in startup. “Inside Google, a team of techies has been working behind the scenes on software for high-speed communications networks that extend from land to space. Codenamed ‘Minkowski’ within Google, the secret project is being unveiled to the public on Monday as a new spinout called Aalyria.”

Lieber Institute West Point: Ukraine Symposium – Military Networks And Cyber Operations In The War In Ukraine

Lieber Institute West Point: Ukraine Symposium – Military Networks And Cyber Operations In The War In Ukraine. “To date, the cyber operations in Ukraine have appeared somewhat muted. In the early hours of 24 February, as Russian troops moved across the borders into Ukraine, satellite internet connections were disrupted, recently attributed by US officials to the Russian military. A number of wiper viruses (HermeticWiper, IsaacWiper, and CaddyWiper) of varying degrees of sophistication have been unleashed at Ukrainian targets, including government departments at the start of the campaign (following an earlier wiper, WhisperGate, directed against government networks in January).”

Bleeping Computer: Russian govt impersonators target telcos in phishing attacks

Bleeping Computer: Russian govt impersonators target telcos in phishing attacks. “A previously unknown and financially motivated hacking group is impersonating a Russian agency in a phishing campaign targeting entities in Eastern European countries. The phishing emails pretend to come from the Russian Government’s Federal Bailiffs Service and are written in the Russian language, with the recipients being telecommunication service providers and industrial firms in Lithuania, Estonia, and Russia.”

Slate: It Looks Like Russia Is Bringing Its State-Owned Telecom Provider Into Its National Security Apparatus

Slate: It Looks Like Russia Is Bringing Its State-Owned Telecom Provider Into Its National Security Apparatus. “Putin has for at least a decade viewed the internet as a threat to regime security. Now, Russia’s national defense conglomerate Rostec is reportedly looking to take over significant ownership of Rostelecom, Russia’s state-owned telecommunications provider. Rostec argued that it works in similar areas as Rostelecom and that foreign sanctions on Russia necessitate more coordination between the state and domestic industry. This represents another step in Putin’s growing securitization of the internet—that is, bringing telecommunications and internet sectors further under the arm of the national security apparatus.”

USAID: USAID Safeguards Internet Access In Ukraine Through Public-private-partnership With SpaceX

USAID: USAID Safeguards Internet Access In Ukraine Through Public-private-partnership With SpaceX. “The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has delivered 5,000 Starlink Terminals to the Government of Ukraine through a public-private partnership with the American aerospace manufacturer, SpaceX. The Starlink satellite terminals will enable unlimited, unthrottled data connectivity from anywhere in Ukraine.”

Fossbytes: Ukraine’s Biggest ISP In Russian Crosshairs As Nokia Deserts Putin’s Surveillance Setup

Fossbytes: Ukraine’s Biggest ISP In Russian Crosshairs As Nokia Deserts Putin’s Surveillance Setup. “Finnish tech firm Nokia joins many other organizations in ostracizing Russia for its ongoing invasion of Ukraine. Earlier this month, CEO Lundmark announced cutting off the company’s ties with the invading nation as per the latest sanctions. According to the NY Times, Nokia would also leave behind some equipment crucial for Russia’s SORM surveillance tool.”

Ars Technica: Mystery solved in destructive attack that knocked out >10k Viasat modems

Ars Technica: Mystery solved in destructive attack that knocked out >10k Viasat modems. “Viasat—the high-speed-satellite-broadband provider whose modems were knocked out in Ukraine and other parts of Europe earlier this month—has confirmed a theory by third-party researchers that new wiper malware with possible ties to the Russian government was responsible for the attack.”

Russia’s Cyber War: What’s Next and What the European Union Should Do. (Council on Foreign Relations)

Council on Foreign Relations: Russia’s Cyber War: What’s Next and What the European Union Should Do.. “As the Russian military shifts its objectives, resources and bandwidth will be freed up to fight from the rear. A cornered Moscow–with few other options left on the table–is likely to resort to the cyber domain, as other pariah states have done, as the ideal vector to circumvent isolation, spy on and disrupt Western defense plans, steal technology and intellectual property it will be cut off from, and heighten its global nuisance with disinformation operations. Recent attacks on a major Ukrainian telecommunications firm, Ukrtelecom, have heightened fears that Russia’s stalling military campaign could cause it to turn to cyber operations as another means of achieving its aims.”

BusinessWire: Comtech Telecommunications Corp. Responds to Aid Request from The Ukrainian Government (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Comtech Telecommunications Corp. Responds to Aid Request from The Ukrainian Government (PRESS RELEASE). “Comtech Telecommunications Corp. (NASDAQ: CMTL), a leading global provider of next-generation 911 emergency systems and secure wireless communications technologies, announced today that the Company has donated COMET™ troposcatter systems at the request of the Ukrainian government.”

Bloomberg: Spain Seeks to Tax Facebook, Google Services as Phone Carriers

Bloomberg: Spain Seeks to Tax Facebook, Google Services as Phone Carriers. “Under a new law proposed by the government, ‘all operators who provide telecommunication services without having to provide phone numbers, such as WhatsApp’ and Telegram would have to register as telecommunications operators and would be taxed based on revenue, Sanchez said in a press conference. Currently, only phone operators that can provide phone numbers need to sign up as telecom operators, he said.”

Technical .ly: Check out satellite telecomms company Iridium’s new online museum

Technical .ly: Check out satellite telecomms company Iridium’s new online museum. “Local institutions such as the National Zoo and the International Spy Museum are juuuuuuust beginning to open back up amid the coronavirus pandemic. But if you’re not comfy being around other people in public yet, Iridium Communications has something neat for you: The McLean, Virginia-based satellite constellation operator has launched an online museum to commemorate its work over the past 20 years.”

Qatar National Library: Qatar Digital Library Sheds Light on the First Communications Revolution in the Gulf

Qatar National Library: Qatar Digital Library Sheds Light on the First Communications Revolution in the Gulf. “…in the 1860s, Britain sought to build a commercial telegraph line all the way to its most important colony, British India. As a result, the Gulf became one of the most important communication corridors of the British Empire. A series of historical documents held by the British Library and now available on the QDL reveal how the proposal to extend Britain’s telegraph line through the Gulf was first made in May 1860. That month, John Wortley de la More, an entrepreneur in the telegraph industry, outlined his plans to extend the existing lines further through Persia and the Gulf by establishing a link first from Baghdad to Basra, and then from Basra to Karachi, British India’s westernmost port (in modern-day Pakistan).”

Bangladesh Developing Database of ISPs

The government of Bangladesh is developing a database of Internet service providers. “Bangladesh Telecommunication Regulatory Commission has issued licences to 434 internet service providers (ISPs) in six categories….Officials said apart from the authorised ISPs, a huge number of unauthorised ISPs based on the small areas in the capital and other parts of the country were offering internet services by collecting bandwidth from the licence holders. But, miscreants carry out different cyber crimes using the internet line from the unauthorised ISPs as well as cyber cafes.”