Ohio State News: Why technology alone can’t solve the digital divide

Ohio State News: Why technology alone can’t solve the digital divide. “For some communities, the digital divide remains even after they have access to computers and fast internet, new research shows. A study of the Bhutanese refugee community in Columbus found that even though more than 95% of the population had access to the internet, very few were using it to connect with local resources and online news. And the study, which was done during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic stay-at-home orders in Ohio, found that nearly three-quarters of respondents never used the internet for telehealth services.”

Washington Post: Health apps share your concerns with advertisers. HIPAA can’t stop it.

Washington Post: Health apps share your concerns with advertisers. HIPAA can’t stop it.. “In a nation with millions of uninsured families and a shortage of health professionals, many of us turn to health-care apps and websites for accessible information or even potential treatment. But when you fire up a symptom-checker or digital therapy app, you might be unknowingly sharing your concerns with more than just the app maker.”

Stanford Medicine: Delivering free (tele)health care to Ukrainians

Stanford Medicine: Delivering free (tele)health care to Ukrainians. “In the days immediately following the Russian invasion of Ukraine on Feb. 24, Annalicia Pickering, MD, a pediatric hospitalist with Stanford Medicine; Solomiia Savchuk, a student at the Stanford School of Medicine; and Zoe von Gerlach, a Stanford engineering graduate student, set a bold intention: Find a way to provide meaningful medical support to people in Ukraine. Just months later, the confluence of their efforts has led to the launch of a telehealth program, called Telehelp Ukraine, that serves Ukrainians who need medical assistance — those who remain in their home country as well as those who have sought refuge in Poland.”

University of Alberta: App uses artificial intelligence to track healing wounds in real time

University of Alberta: App uses artificial intelligence to track healing wounds in real time. “Three U of A engineering students have developed a mobile app that tracks the progress of a healing wound. The app calculates whether treatments are working as they should based on descriptions of size, depth and shape along with more subjective impressions of pain and irritation, says programmer Connor Povoledo. Accurate tracking can predict infection and other complications and allow patients, particularly in remote areas, to decide whether urgent care is needed.”

NPR: What a bottle of ivermectin reveals about the shadowy world of COVID telemedicine

NPR: What a bottle of ivermectin reveals about the shadowy world of COVID telemedicine. “Data shows that prescriptions for drugs like ivermectin have surged in the pandemic, but patient-doctor confidentiality often obscures exactly who is handing out the drugs. [Ben] Bergquam’s testimonial provides new and troubling details about a small group of physicians who are willing to eschew the best COVID-19 treatments and provide alternative therapies made popular by disinformation — for a price.”

CNET: The pandemic changed health care, and there’s no going back

CNET: The pandemic changed health care, and there’s no going back. “Video-calls-as-doctor’s-visit wasn’t a tool created because of COVID-19, but the pandemic has transformed it from an obscure practice to the new way to do health care. Importantly, policy changes made during the pandemic helped knock down some barriers for telemedicine access, and helped providers get paid for it.”

Washington Post: Patients and doctors who embraced telehealth during the pandemic fear it will become harder to access

Washington Post: Patients and doctors who embraced telehealth during the pandemic fear it will become harder to access. “This summer, more than 430 health-related organizations, including hospitals, professional bodies and patient-advocacy groups, urged congressional leaders to keep the gateways to telehealth open, arguing that much of health-care delivery has moved online ‘not only to meet COVID-driven patient demand, but to prepare for America’s future health care needs.’ Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have shown support for making the shift to telehealth permanent through mechanisms such as the Connect for Health Act. But many states have already rescinded the licensing waivers that allowed clinicians and some other providers to practice across state lines, or are preparing to do so. Other decisions at the state, federal and individual health-care system levels remain uncertain.”

Independent: Beats of the Swinging Sixties a hit with stroke patients on Zoom

Independent (Ireland): Beats of the Swinging Sixties a hit with stroke patients on Zoom. “Karen Roberts is using Zoom to conduct online exercise classes and has discovered the musical hits from that period have ‘the perfect beat and tempo’ to get the best results. Initially she was providing free socially distanced dance exercise classes on the public green at Maunsells Park in Galway to help elderly cocooners maintain muscle strength during the pandemic.”

MIT Technology Review: Pregnant in the pandemic? It helps to have good Wi-Fi.

MIT Technology Review: Pregnant in the pandemic? It helps to have good Wi-Fi.. “Pregnancy, including birth and aftercare, is the single largest reason for hospital visits in the US, and on average a typical pregnancy will involve between 12 and 14 medical appointments. Proper prenatal visits can prevent life-threatening complications. But limiting in-person care is vital during the pandemic, especially for pregnant women, who are more likely to develop severe or even fatal covid infections. As a result, an unprecedented number of women are turning to virtual care or telehealth services such as video appointments, text support, and phone calls. ”

EurekAlert: Building surge ICU capacity during COVID-19

EurekAlert: Building surge ICU capacity during COVID-19. “To prepare for current and future waves of COVID-19, the U.S. Army’s Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center asked teams from across the country to compete to build a telehealth prototype that would provide adequate ICU capacity when cases surge. Of the 78 teams that competed, only nine were invited to complete a series of tasks designed to establish the feasibility of their prototypes. A Medical University of South Carolina team of bioinformatics, telehealth and critical care experts was one of those nine.”

EurekAlert: Using telehealth to transition diabetes inpatients to virtual care during COVID-19

EurekAlert: Using telehealth to transition diabetes inpatients to virtual care during COVID-19. “Data collected over a 15-week period showed that using virtual care to manage diabetes patients in the hospital does not have a negative impact on their glycemic outcomes. This study, aimed at reducing provider and patient exposure during the COVID-19 pandemic, has broader implications for implementing telehealth to diabetes care in remote locations and to limit the transmission of hospital-acquired infections.”

TechCrunch: Google starts highlighting virtual care options in Search and Maps

TechCrunch: Google starts highlighting virtual care options in Search and Maps. “The COVID-19 pandemic has put a spotlight on virtual care options as both doctors and patients try to reduce in-person visits for routine care as much as possible. Patients aren’t always aware of what’s available to them, though, so over the course of the next two weeks, Google will roll out new features in Search and Maps that will highlight telehealth options.”