Law .com: Social Media Postings May Risk User Copyrights

Law .com: Social Media Postings May Risk User Copyrights. “Most people sign up for social media platforms without taking the time or effort to read the platform’s Terms of Use. In his Technology Law column, Peter Brown discusses a recent decision from the Southern District of New York that illustrates why this may be a risky proposition for professional photographers, artists or anyone who values their creative intellectual property.”

TechCrunch: Bloomberg memes push Instagram to require sponsorship disclosure

TechCrunch: Bloomberg memes push Instagram to require sponsorship disclosure. “Instagram is changing its advertising rules to require political campaigns’ sponsored posts from influencers to use its Branded Content Ads tool that puts a disclosure label of ‘Paid Partnership With’ on posts. The change comes after the Bloomberg presidential campaign paid meme makers to post screenshots that showed him asking them to make him look cool.”

‘I was charged £50 for leaving a negative review’: Food subscription service My Farm Fresh Box under fire for its bad feedback fee (This is Money)

This is Money: ‘I was charged £50 for leaving a negative review’: Food subscription service My Farm Fresh Box under fire for its bad feedback fee. “Ms E, who does not wish to be named, initially signed up to a free trial from My Farm Fresh Box, which delivers fruit and vegetables to subscribers homes, to see what the service was like. But when she posted on Trustpilot about the £20 cancellation fee that she hadn’t spotted, she was then hit with another surprise she hadn’t spotted when she signed up – a £50 fee for bad feedback.” Out of curiosity, I went and looked at the Trustpilot reviews for this company and not only is it getting pounded with bad reviews, but Trustpilot has put up a banner about its policies.

The Verge: Iowa conspiracy theories are testing Facebook’s misinformation policy

The Verge: Iowa conspiracy theories are testing Facebook’s misinformation policy . “Iowa state officials and Democratic Party members are fighting online misinformation and conspiracies alongside widespread technical problems, and the resulting chaos is putting platforms’ newly released misinformation policies to the test.”

ZDNet: 14% of Android app privacy policies contain contradictions about data collection

ZDNet: 14% of Android app privacy policies contain contradictions about data collection. “In an academic study published last year, researchers created a tool named PolicyLint that analyzed the language used in the privacy policies of 11,430 Play Store apps. They found that 14.2% (1,618 apps) contained a privacy policy with logical contradicting statements about data collection.”

Exclusive: Facebook Fired A Contractor Who Was Paid Thousands In Bribes To Reactivate Banned Ad Accounts (BuzzFeed News)

BuzzFeed News: Exclusive: Facebook Fired A Contractor Who Was Paid Thousands In Bribes To Reactivate Banned Ad Accounts. “A Facebook contractor was paid thousands of dollars in bribes by a shady affiliate marketer to reactivate ad accounts that had been banned due to policy violations, a BuzzFeed News investigation has found. A company spokesperson confirmed that an unnamed worker was fired after inquiries from BuzzFeed News sparked an internal investigation. The person in question was based in the company’s Austin office, according to information obtained by BuzzFeed News.”

BuzzFeed News: Facebook Says Anonymous Pages Posting Coordinated Pro-Trump Content Do Not Break Its Rules

BuzzFeed News: Facebook Says Anonymous Pages Posting Coordinated Pro-Trump Content Do Not Break Its Rules. “The pages and their murky connections to a political candidate highlight the challenges in determining who is behind coordinated activity on Facebook, whose interest page networks may serve, and what does and doesn’t rise to the platform’s standard of ‘coordinated inauthentic behavior.’ The enforcement of that policy is a major focus going into next year’s US election, as Facebook works to prevent the rampant manipulation and inauthentic behavior that marred the 2016 campaign on the world’s largest social network.”

International Business Times: DoNotPay’s ‘Robot Lawyer’ Offers Advice On License Agreements Before You Accept The Terms

International Business Times: DoNotPay’s ‘Robot Lawyer’ Offers Advice On License Agreements Before You Accept The Terms. “DoNotPay, the popular robot lawyer that helps users contest parking tickets and sue people is now launching a new tool called Do Not Sign. This latest tool aims to help users better understand license agreements. DoNotPay’s monthly subscription fee of $3 already includes the nifty new tool. Do Not Sign allows users to upload, scan, copy, and paste the URLs of any kind of license agreement that they would like to check. It utilizes machine learning to identify clauses it thinks users must know about. This includes options to choose not to allow data collection.”

Mashable: YouTube says it can delete your account if you’re not ‘commercially viable’

Mashable: YouTube says it can delete your account if you’re not ‘commercially viable’ . “As written, these broad terms give YouTube the power to delete a creators’ account if they upload or livestream video that, for example, doesn’t pull in enough advertising revenue. YouTube viewers aren’t in the clear either. Notice the terms are worded to cover anyone who has an account, not just its content creators. The language used can mean that a user who looks at lots of content but doesn’t necessarily monetize can also have their account removed.” The article has been updated with a couple of responses.

CNN: Considering deleting FaceApp? It won’t be easy to get your data back

CNN: Considering deleting FaceApp? It won’t be easy to get your data back. “If you’ve downloaded an app or visited a website and are concerned about your personal information, there are steps you can take to try to revoke access to it.
Revoking an app’s access to personal information or a feature, such as your camera, is another way to limit sharing your data. But this isn’t retroactive; it’ll just cut off its access to new data moving forward.”

The Intercept: Right-Wing Sting Group Project Veritas Is Breaking Facebook’s “Authentic Behavior” Rule. Now What?

The Intercept: Right-Wing Sting Group Project Veritas Is Breaking Facebook’s “Authentic Behavior” Rule. Now What?. “A MEMBER OF Project Veritas gave testimony in a federal court case indicating that the right-wing group, known for its undercover videos, violates Facebook policies designed to counter systematic deception by Russian troll farms and other groups. The deposition raises questions over whether Facebook will deter American operatives who use the platform to strategically deceive and damage political opponents as vigorously as it has Iranian and Russian propagandists. But is the company capable of doing so without just creating more problems?”

Neowin: Twitter is throwing out the old rule book and replacing it with a simpler one

Neowin: Twitter is throwing out the old rule book and replacing it with a simpler one. “Back in April last year, Twitter announced that it in the process of updating its privacy policy to meet GDPR rules, it has also made it easier to read. Now, the firm has announced a similar move but this time pertaining to the simplification of the Twitter Rules.”

Consumer Contracts Restatement Delayed: Consumers Win…For Now (Naked Capitalism)

Naked Capitalism: Consumer Contracts Restatement Delayed: Consumers Win…For Now. “Over the last several decades, US corporations have succeeded in making the legal system more business-friendly. Earlier this month, on May 21, consumers scored a small win, when the American Law Institute (ALI) failed to vote on its Restatement of the Law of Consumer Contracts – effectively shelving the project until at least this time next year. For the non-lawyers, this topic may appear to be abstruse and technical. Please stick with me.”

Motherboard: Most Online ‘Terms of Service’ Are Incomprehensible to Adults, Study Finds

Motherboard: Most Online ‘Terms of Service’ Are Incomprehensible to Adults, Study Finds. “Two law professors analyzed the sign-in terms and conditions of 500 popular US websites, including Google and Facebook, and found that more than 99 percent of them were ‘unreadable,’ far exceeding the level most American adults read at, but are still enforced.”