Wired: ProtonMail Amends Its Policy After Giving Up an Activist’s Data

Wired: ProtonMail Amends Its Policy After Giving Up an Activist’s Data. “As usual, the devil is in the details—ProtonMail’s original policy simply said that the service does not keep IP logs ‘by default.’ However, as a Swiss company, ProtonMail was obliged to comply with a Swiss court’s demand that it begin logging IP address and browser fingerprint information for a particular ProtonMail account.”

Legal Genealogist: Ancestry retreats

Legal Genealogist: Ancestry retreats. “According to Ancestry now, users who upload content to Ancestry still give Ancestry a perpetual and non-revocable license to use the content. But, it says now, ‘perpetual and non-revocable’ doesn’t mean ‘perpetual and non-revocable.’”

The Legal Genealogist: One big change at Ancestry

The Legal Genealogist: One big change at Ancestry. “Ancestry has just updated its terms of service and privacy statement — again — and this time there is a change buried deep in its language that is of significance to users. As of the change, effective yesterday (3 August 2021), a user can’t change his or her mind about any content uploaded to Ancestry: as of yesterday, you’ve just gifted the rights to that content to Ancestry, forever.”

GovInsider: France builds tool to track changes in terms of service

GovInsider Asia: France builds tool to track changes in terms of service. “Digital services are governed by pages and pages of terms and clauses, but users don’t always know what they’re agreeing to, or what rights they have when using those services. France plans to change that with a new tool called the Open Terms Archive. It is meant to ‘provide transparency’ to help citizens, authorities and regulators understand tech’s terms of service, says French Ambassador for Digital Affairs Henri Verdier.”

Law .com: Social Media Postings May Risk User Copyrights

Law .com: Social Media Postings May Risk User Copyrights. “Most people sign up for social media platforms without taking the time or effort to read the platform’s Terms of Use. In his Technology Law column, Peter Brown discusses a recent decision from the Southern District of New York that illustrates why this may be a risky proposition for professional photographers, artists or anyone who values their creative intellectual property.”

TechCrunch: Bloomberg memes push Instagram to require sponsorship disclosure

TechCrunch: Bloomberg memes push Instagram to require sponsorship disclosure. “Instagram is changing its advertising rules to require political campaigns’ sponsored posts from influencers to use its Branded Content Ads tool that puts a disclosure label of ‘Paid Partnership With’ on posts. The change comes after the Bloomberg presidential campaign paid meme makers to post screenshots that showed him asking them to make him look cool.”

‘I was charged £50 for leaving a negative review’: Food subscription service My Farm Fresh Box under fire for its bad feedback fee (This is Money)

This is Money: ‘I was charged £50 for leaving a negative review’: Food subscription service My Farm Fresh Box under fire for its bad feedback fee. “Ms E, who does not wish to be named, initially signed up to a free trial from My Farm Fresh Box, which delivers fruit and vegetables to subscribers homes, to see what the service was like. But when she posted on Trustpilot about the £20 cancellation fee that she hadn’t spotted, she was then hit with another surprise she hadn’t spotted when she signed up – a £50 fee for bad feedback.” Out of curiosity, I went and looked at the Trustpilot reviews for this company and not only is it getting pounded with bad reviews, but Trustpilot has put up a banner about its policies.

ZDNet: 14% of Android app privacy policies contain contradictions about data collection

ZDNet: 14% of Android app privacy policies contain contradictions about data collection. “In an academic study published last year, researchers created a tool named PolicyLint that analyzed the language used in the privacy policies of 11,430 Play Store apps. They found that 14.2% (1,618 apps) contained a privacy policy with logical contradicting statements about data collection.”

Exclusive: Facebook Fired A Contractor Who Was Paid Thousands In Bribes To Reactivate Banned Ad Accounts (BuzzFeed News)

BuzzFeed News: Exclusive: Facebook Fired A Contractor Who Was Paid Thousands In Bribes To Reactivate Banned Ad Accounts. “A Facebook contractor was paid thousands of dollars in bribes by a shady affiliate marketer to reactivate ad accounts that had been banned due to policy violations, a BuzzFeed News investigation has found. A company spokesperson confirmed that an unnamed worker was fired after inquiries from BuzzFeed News sparked an internal investigation. The person in question was based in the company’s Austin office, according to information obtained by BuzzFeed News.”

BuzzFeed News: Facebook Says Anonymous Pages Posting Coordinated Pro-Trump Content Do Not Break Its Rules

BuzzFeed News: Facebook Says Anonymous Pages Posting Coordinated Pro-Trump Content Do Not Break Its Rules. “The pages and their murky connections to a political candidate highlight the challenges in determining who is behind coordinated activity on Facebook, whose interest page networks may serve, and what does and doesn’t rise to the platform’s standard of ‘coordinated inauthentic behavior.’ The enforcement of that policy is a major focus going into next year’s US election, as Facebook works to prevent the rampant manipulation and inauthentic behavior that marred the 2016 campaign on the world’s largest social network.”