Highland County Press: Husted launches AI tool to analyze Ohio regulations

Highland County Press: Husted launches AI tool to analyze Ohio regulations. Ohio’s Lt. Governor Jon Husted. “The project launched Thursday, procured with the assistance of InnovateOhio, uses text analytics and artificial intelligence to analyze Ohio’s rules. By comparing and linking data sets— a task that could take humans months or years — it will provide government policymakers with opportunities to streamline regulations. The tool will more quickly sort data from the Ohio Revised Code (ORC) and Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) in order to narrow the work that needs to be done by human analysts.”

EurekAlert: ORNL researchers develop ‘multitasking’ AI tool to extract cancer data in record time

EurekAlert: ORNL researchers develop ‘multitasking’ AI tool to extract cancer data in record time. “To better leverage cancer data for research, scientists at [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] are developing an artificial intelligence-based natural language processing tool to improve information extraction from textual pathology reports. The project is part of a DOE-National Cancer Institute collaboration known as the Joint Design of Advanced Computing Solutions for Cancer (JDACS4C) that is accelerating research by merging cancer data with advanced data analysis and high-performance computing.”

PR Newswire: Bloomberg Law Introduces Brief Analyzer, New AI Tool For Review And Analysis Of Legal Briefs (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Bloomberg Law Introduces Brief Analyzer, New AI Tool For Review And Analysis Of Legal Briefs (PRESS RELEASE). “Brief Analyzer enables Bloomberg Law subscribers to quickly and securely upload a legal brief for analysis. Leveraging machine learning techniques, Brief Analyzer reviews the text of the uploaded document to identify authorities cited in the brief and additionally suggests other content for review, including relevant cases not cited in the brief, similar briefs from other dockets, and Practical Guidance.”

EurekAlert: Carnegie Mellon leverages AI to give voice to the voiceless

EurekAlert: Carnegie Mellon leverages AI to give voice to the voiceless. “The [ Carnegie Mellon University’s Language Technologies Institute (LTI)] researchers have developed a system that leverages artificial intelligence to rapidly analyze hundreds of thousands of comments on social media and identify the fraction that defend or sympathize with disenfranchised minorities such as the Rohingya community. Human social media moderators, who couldn’t possibly manually sift through so many comments, would then have the option to highlight this ‘help speech’ in comment sections.”

Penn Today: ‘May the force be with you’ and other fan fiction favorites

Penn Today: ‘May the force be with you’ and other fan fiction favorites. “As a new Star Wars movie hits the multiplex, Penn researchers are launching a new computer-based tool to better understand fiction written by fans based on that blockbuster series and several other famous film franchises.”

The Digital Pulpit: A Nationwide Analysis of Online Sermons (Pew)

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): The Digital Pulpit: A Nationwide Analysis of Online Sermons. “Frequent churchgoers may have a good sense of what kind of sermons to expect from their own clergy: how long they usually last, how much they dwell on biblical texts, whether the messages lean toward fire and brimstone or toward love and self-acceptance. But what are other Americans hearing from the pulpits in their congregations?” The methodology was as fascinating to me as the research.

Nature: A global database of historic and real-time flood events based on social media

Nature: A global database of historic and real-time flood events based on social media. “Early event detection and response can significantly reduce the societal impact of floods. Currently, early warning systems rely on gauges, radar data, models and informal local sources. However, the scope and reliability of these systems are limited. Recently, the use of social media for detecting disasters has shown promising results, especially for earthquakes. Here, we present a new database for detecting floods in real-time on a global scale using Twitter.”

1 News Now (New Zealand): Kiwi teen uses AI analysis of social media chatter to capture mood of the nation

1 News Now (New Zealand): Kiwi teen uses AI analysis of social media chatter to capture mood of the nation. “Independent political insights website Politikiwi started off as a personal project for 19-year-old software engineer Robert Calvert’s portfolio. Since December 2018, he’s gathered over 58,000 responses from people to tweets by party leaders in Parliament. He then put each tweet through Microsoft or Google’s natural language processing technology to analyse its sentiment — whether positive or negative towards the MP — based on the quantified emotional connotation of words used in context.”

EurekAlert: Data mining applied to scholarly publications to finally reveal Earth’s biodiversity

EurekAlert: Data mining applied to scholarly publications to finally reveal Earth’s biodiversity. “The Biodiversity Literature Repository (BLR), a joint project of Plazi, Pensoft and Zenodo at CERN, takes on the challenge to open up the access to the data trapped in scientific publications, and find out how many species we know so far, what are their most important characteristics (also referred to as descriptions or taxonomic treatments), and how they look on various images. To do so, BLR uses highly standardised formats and terminology, typical for scientific publications, to discover and extract data from text written primarily for human consumption.”

TechCrunch: AI is helping scholars restore ancient Greek texts on stone tablets

TechCrunch: AI is helping scholars restore ancient Greek texts on stone tablets. “Machine learning and AI may be deployed on such grand tasks as finding exoplanets and creating photorealistic people, but the same techniques also have some surprising applications in academia: DeepMind has created an AI system that helps scholars understand and recreate fragmentary ancient Greek texts on broken stone tablets.”

The Daily Universe: BYU Law creates language database to help interpret Constitution

The Daily Universe: BYU Law creates language database to help interpret Constitution. BYU is Brigham Young University. “This database is called the Corpus of Founding Era American English, also known as COFEA. ‘Corpus’ refers to a collection of written texts on a particular subject. The corpus holds founding-era documents that can be used by legal professionals for free as a tool to make educated legal decisions.”

Phys .org: Trump’s Twitter communication style shifted over time based on varying communication goals

Phys .org: Trump’s Twitter communication style shifted over time based on varying communication goals. “While many journalists and academics have analysed the topics and sentiment of Trump’s tweets, the range of different rhetorical strategies and discursive styles deployed by Donald Trump is not well studied. The authors of the study downloaded the corpus of tweets sent from the @realDonaldTrump Twitter account from 2009 and 2018 preserved in the Trump Twitter Archive. By analysing patterns of grammatical co-occurence, the authors were able to identify four general style variations of Trump’s tweets: 1) conversational; 2) campaigning; 3) advisory; 4) engaged, and to observe how these stylistic patterns shifted over time.”

SwissInfo: Study finds Big Data eliminates confidentiality in court judgements

SwissInfo: Study finds Big Data eliminates confidentiality in court judgements. “Swiss researchers have found that algorithms that mine large swaths of data can eliminate anonymity in federal court rulings. This could have major ramifications for transparency and privacy protection.”

National Library of Scotland: Data Foundry launched

National Library of Scotland: Data Foundry launched. “The new Data Foundry site presents Library collections as data in a machine-readable format, widening the scope for digital research and analysis. Techniques like content mining and image analysis can now be carried out using the Library’s collections.”

Phys .org: New tool mines scientific texts for fusion protein facts

Phys .org: New tool mines scientific texts for fusion protein facts. “Different kinds of fusion proteins can arise naturally in the human body, sometimes leading to cancer. Understanding interactions between fusion proteins and other proteins can help improve personalized cancer treatment. However, the number of scientific papers discussing these interactions is growing rapidly, and there is no standard format for presenting this information. Thus, organizing and keeping abreast of this knowledge poses a major challenge.”