New England Public Radio: ‘Nu’? A Software Program That Reads Yiddish

New England Public Radio: ‘Nu’? A Software Program That Reads Yiddish. “New software for searching words in digitized Yiddish books — many originally written in the 19th and early 20th centuries — is about to be unveiled. The search tool will be available via the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, Massachusetts. Its digital library includes more than 10,000 books in Yiddish — but the current ability to search them is limited.”

XDA Developers: Firefox ScreenshotGo helps you organize your screenshots and search them by text

XDA Developers: Firefox ScreenshotGo helps you organize your screenshots and search them by text. “Basically, ScreenshotGo helps organize all the screenshots present in the OS. In addition, it helps search through screenshots using text. For example, if you’re looking for a specific article you took a screenshot of, all you have to do is search for some of the text from the article itself and let the application do the rest.”

Internet Archive: The Mueller Report, Searchable and Accessible on the Archive

Internet Archive: The Mueller Report, Searchable and Accessible on the Archive. “We have the tools that empower people to share and discover public domain documents like government reports. Thanks to our community members who moved quickly to upload copies, the world can now search, share, download or read a mobile-friendly version of the Mueller report for free.”

Facebook Releases fastText As Open Source

More open source! Facebook has released fastText on GitHub. “Every day, billions of pieces of content are shared on Facebook. To keep up with the data, Facebook has been using a variety of tools to classify text. Traditional methods of classification, like deep neural networks are accurate, but have serious training requirements. In an effort to classify both accurately and easily, Facebook’s Artificial Intelligence Research (FAIR) lab developed fastText. Today, fastText is going open source so developers can implement its libraries anywhere.”

Android App Helps You Find Text on Printed Pages

Lifehacker has a writeup on a nifty Android tool that makes it easier to find words on a printed page. “It’s pretty straightforward: You take a picture of the printed text you want to search, and CTRL-F quickly analyzes the text to create a searchable, digital version on your phone.” I can see this being useful when you’re doing genealogy or searches with a lot of small, printed text.