Virginia Tech: Historical costume descriptors bridge gap between past and present

Virginia Tech: Historical costume descriptors bridge gap between past and present. “The objective is to compare language from the past with new language that we use today to describe costume artifacts across different time periods. The Oris Glisson Historic Costume and Textile Collection will be digitized and made available to the public, increasing accessibility and access.”

The Verge: The Archive Saving Home Sewing History From The Trash

New-to-me, from The Verge: The Archive Saving Home Sewing History From The Trash. ” The Commercial Pattern Archive is one of the few projects in the world that safeguards these documents that are fragile, easily forgotten, and born to die. A labor of love and insistence on the part of a small team of historians, costume designers, archivists, and hobbyists, the archive began in the 1990s and includes a physical stash and digital database of English-language patterns unparalleled in its scope and depth. CoPA is home to around 56,000 physical patterns going back to the 1800s, along with books, pamphlets, journals, and other related material.”

Microsoft News: This museum is using AI to remind us of all the threads we have in common

Microsoft News: This museum is using AI to remind us of all the threads we have in common. “On the INTERWOVEN website, a single click on the image of a mid-19th-early 20th century Kashmiri shawl fragment with the paisley motif leads one on a cultural odyssey that takes you to dozens of places where the motif appears. This includes a church in Britain, a chasuble from Italy, and a cloth panel from ancient Persia among others.”

PR Newswire: Sustainable fashion search engine, Ethical Clothing, launches in the US & Canada with thousands of searchable, ethically produced clothes (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Sustainable fashion search engine, Ethical Clothing, launches in the US & Canada with thousands of searchable, ethically produced clothes (PRESS RELEASE). “An uptick in the importance of brand values and consumer consciousness has resulted in not only large high street brands taking sustainable fashion seriously, but also a significant increase in new smaller brands that have sustainability baked into their DNA. Studies in the US show that more than two thirds of Americans are willing to pay more for sustainable products, but most (74%) don’t know how to identify them. The launch of Ethical Clothing’s sustainable fashion search engine in North America aims to resolve this problem.”

The Verge: Developers can now try on Google’s Jacquard smart fabric tech

The Verge: Developers can now try on Google’s Jacquard smart fabric tech. “Google’s Project Jacquard touch-sensitive fabric technology, first revealed at Google I/O in 2015, now has a way for interested third-party developers to integrate the tech with their own software via the new Jacquard SDK. Previously only a handful of companies signed up for Jacquard, including Levi’s, Samsonite, and Yves Saint Laurent. Now developers can use the SDK to integrate the Jacquard tag, connecting its sensors with their apps to communicate touch and motion data.”

The Hindu: Botanical Survey of India’s collection of rare paintings, dyes, fabrics and type specimens to go public

The Hindu: Botanical Survey of India’s collection of rare paintings, dyes, fabrics and type specimens to go public. “Apart from botanical paintings, the digital archive also displays rare natural dyes, fabrics and type specimens (the first collection that’s used for describing a plant). Each one of these rare holdings has its own story. Thomas Wardle, a Scottish businessman, whose business in silk dyes wasn’t doing well, visited the industrial section of the Indian Museum and, in one year, came up with about 3,500 samples of dye patterns extracted from 64 Indian plants. The 15 volumes of Wardle’s Specimen of Fabrics Dyed with Indian Dyes, published in 1886 and preserved with the BSI, has also been digitised.”

Mount Mary University: University receives grant to fund fashion archive digitization project

Mount Mary University: University receives grant to fund fashion archive digitization project. “Mount Mary’s Fashion Archive, a historic collection with 10,000 items, will soon be available to the public online. The collection includes both couture and ready-to-wear garments from such fashion luminaries as Cristóbal Balenciaga, Coco Chanel, Christian Dior, Oscar de la Renta, Karl Lagerfeld and more.”

New Indian Express: Weavers hitch wagon to social media

New Indian Express: Weavers hitch wagon to social media. “Weavers who do not have websites, have joined hands with online stores and microblogging sites to get orders. The uploaded videos and content on these sites also put their names on the organic Google rankings page, which will fetch them customers. It seems their ventures have yielded results, and they are earning handsome returns. They are expecting good orders to roll in once the festival season starts.”

Ecotextile News: GoBlu launches Kyna Intel free database

Ecotextile News: GoBlu launches Kyna Intel free database. “Sustainability accelerator GoBlu International has launched a new online database which aims to provide the fashion and textiles industry with information to drive sustainable decision-making. GoBlu developed the curated, searchable database, called Kyna Intel, as a free service to help industry stakeholders navigate the news to find accurate and up-to-date information.”

Fibre2Fashion: German textile fair Heimtextil launches online materials library

Fibre2Fashion: German textile fair Heimtextil launches online materials library. “The curators of the new materials library are London-based futures- research agency, FranklinTill. The Future Materials Library 2021 offers materials pioneers a platform and presents a first-class mix of economically proven and revolutionary developments. FranklinTill has organised the materials in four themes; Regenerative Crops, Remade Fibres, Harvesting Waste Streams, and Sustainable Colour, according to a press release by Messe Frankfurt.”

NPR: ‘Renegade’ Rug Makers Create Community, Tufting On TikTok

NPR: ‘Renegade’ Rug Makers Create Community, Tufting On TikTok . “While Justin Clarke was scrolling through his TikTok feed last summer, a tufting video came across his screen. He was hooked. In these TikTok videos, tufters draw with an industrial metal tool, making textured zig zags and bright curves on a blank canvas. Their tufting guns shoot out yarn in shaggy lines of color.”

Big Think: Cotton masks outperform synthetic fibers in humidity test

Big Think: Cotton masks outperform synthetic fibers in humidity test. “A recent study, published in ACS Applied Nano Materials, investigated the durability of cloth and synthetic masks in environments meant to mimic the humidity generated by breathing. The researchers found that filtration efficiency (how well each material captures particles) increased by 33 percent with cotton fabrics.”

Queens Chronicle: Embroidering the texture of life mid-pandemic

Queens Chronicle: Embroidering the texture of life mid-pandemic. “Faced with the opportunity to put together an in-person art show during the pandemic, multimedia artist Azikiwe Mohammed bridged the gap between moments of levity and inequity. Mohammed’s work as a photographer and visual artist has largely focused on documenting the stories of black, brown and marginalized communities across the country. He’s taken that ethos focused on celebrating people of color and applied it to a new medium and a grim moment in history.”

Associated Press: Famed medieval Bayeux Tapestry goes online – every thread

Associated Press: Famed medieval Bayeux Tapestry goes online – every thread. “The world-famous medieval Bayeux Tapestry may be off-limits to visitors because of the coronavirus pandemic, but its keepers have put a digital version online so the public can enjoy its fabled cloth from the safety of home. At nearly 70 meters (77 yards) long, users may have to be skilled at using the scroll function of their computers.”

Input: This tool lets you zoom in on Raphael’s breathtaking tapestries

Input: This tool lets you zoom in on Raphael’s breathtaking tapestries. “The Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) has released an online tool that allows viewers to take in the stunning beauty and mystery of one of the most impressive Renaissance artists, Raphael. Marking the painter’s 500th anniversary, this V&A virtual magnifying glass is a product of collaborative work with the Factum Foundation for Digital Technology in Conservation. The resulting program renders Raphael’s work in breathtakingly minute detail, down to the shafts of light and warmth or conversely, darkness on figures’ faces.”