Auditor: Iowa misallocated at least $21 million in COVID-19 funds (Des Moines Register)

Des Moines Register: Auditor: Iowa misallocated at least $21 million in COVID-19 funds. “Iowa’s government misallocated at least $21 million of federal assistance intended for COVID-19 relief and must correct the error by the end of the year or face having to repay the money, State Auditor Rob Sand says. Iowa used the money from the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security, or CARES, Act to help pay for a new accounting system.”

Antiques Trade Gazette: ILAB president announces launch of missing books database following re-election

Antiques Trade Gazette: ILAB president announces launch of missing books database following re-election. “Australian book dealer Sally Burdon said she will use her second term as [International League of Antiquarian Booksellers] president to consolidate changes and launch a new missing books register following the international book trade association’s recent election.”

Apollo Magazine: The late Robert Freeman was the Beatles’ favourite photographer – and now his entire archive has been stolen

Apollo Magazine: The late Robert Freeman was the Beatles’ favourite photographer – and now his entire archive has been stolen. “The archive stretched back to Freeman’s work in the early 1960s for the Sunday Times, where he made his name shooting portraits – from Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev to jazz greats such as Dizzy Gillespie and John Coltrane. His moody monochrome shots of the saxophonist – bebop was rather more to Freeman’s musical taste than pop music – subsequently brought him to the attention of Brian Epstein, manager of a Liverpudlian four-piece who were at that time storming the ‘hit parade’. In short order, Freeman became the Beatles’ most trusted photographer; he travelled with them on tour, discussing music and sharing a room with John Lennon, and was the go-to man for their album-cover portraits.”

Smithsonian Magazine: The Inside Story Of The $8 Million Heist From The Carnegie Library

Smithsonian Magazine: The Inside Story Of The $8 Million Heist From The Carnegie Library. “There are two types of people who frequent special collections that are open to the public: scholars who want to study something in particular, and others who just want to see something interesting. Both groups are often drawn to incunables. Books printed at the dawn of European movable type, between 1450 and 1500, incunables are old, rare and historically important. In short, an incunable is so valued and usually such a prominent holding that any thief who wanted to avoid detection would not steal one. The Oliver Room thief stole ten.”

Reuters: Levandowski gets 18 months in prison for stealing Google files

Reuters: Levandowski gets 18 months in prison for stealing Google files. “A U.S. judge on Tuesday sentenced former Google engineer Anthony Levandowski to 18 months in prison for stealing a trade secret from Google related to self-driving cars months before becoming the head of Uber Technologies Inc’s (UBER.N) rival unit.”

Feds begin prosecuting fraudulent PPP coronavirus loans. Some cases will be hard to win (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: Feds begin prosecuting fraudulent PPP coronavirus loans. Some cases will be hard to win. “Ever since the public backlash last April against some large, well-off or nationwide companies that helped themselves to emergency government funds intended to rescue small businesses during the pandemic, federal officials have vowed to crack down on any abuses of the popular program, also known as PPP. That effort is now underway with more than a dozen criminal cases filed in 11 states in recent weeks. All involve allegations of blatant fraud, such as lying on applications, falsifying tax or business records and misappropriating money. And most involve relatively small businesses or individual owners.”

EurekAlert: No honor among cyber thieves

EurekAlert: No honor among cyber thieves. “A backstabbing crime boss and thousands of people looking for free tutorials on hacking and identity theft were two of the more interesting findings of a study examining user activity on two online ‘carding forums,’ illegal sites that specialize in stolen credit card information.”

Reuters: Monkeys steal coronavirus blood samples in India

Reuters: Monkeys steal coronavirus blood samples in India. “A troop of monkeys in India attacked a medical official and snatched away blood samples of patients who had tested positive for the novel coronavirus… The attack occurred this week when a laboratory technician was walking in the campus of a state-run medical college in Meerut, 460 km (285 miles) north of Lucknow, capital of Uttar Pradesh state.”

CNN: One man lost his life savings in a SIM hack. Here’s how you can try to protect yourself

CNN: One man lost his life savings in a SIM hack. Here’s how you can try to protect yourself. “Robert Ross was sitting in his San Francisco home office in October 2018 when he noticed the bars on his phone had disappeared and he had no cell coverage. A few hours later, he had lost $1 million. Ross was the victim of a SIM hack, an attack that occurs when hackers take over a victim’s phone number by transferring it to a SIM card they control.”

Art Loss Register: the world’s largest database of stolen and missing art (Financial Times)

Financial Times, and for some reason it’s not paywalled: Art Loss Register: the world’s largest database of stolen and missing art. “Continually updated and currently numbering some 700,000 items, from vintage earrings to Greek statues and Impressionist paintings, it aims to provide a global picture of works that aren’t where they ought to be, or whose ownership is under investigation. Thefts can be logged, and items with questionable provenance or uncertain legal title cross-checked.”

Bloomberg Quint: Scammer Gets Five Years for $120 Million Theft From Facebook and Google

Bloomberg Quint: Scammer Gets Five Years for $120 Million Theft From Facebook and Google. “The scheme netted about $23 million from Google in 2013 and about $98 million from Facebook in 2015, a person familiar with the case said in March. Prosecutors haven’t publicly identified the companies, but Google and Facebook have both confirmed they were victims. The companies said in March they recovered the bulk of the funds and were cooperating with law enforcement.”

Brian Krebs: The Great $50M African IP Address Heist

Brian Krebs: The Great $50M African IP Address Heist. “A top executive at the nonprofit entity responsible for doling out chunks of Internet addresses to businesses and other organizations in Africa has resigned his post following accusations that he secretly operated several companies which sold tens of millions of dollars worth of the increasingly scarce resource to online marketers. The allegations stemmed from a three-year investigation by a U.S.-based researcher whose findings shed light on a murky area of Internet governance that is all too often exploited by spammers and scammers alike.”

BBC: How bots are stealing artwork from artists on Twitter

BBC: How bots are stealing artwork from artists on Twitter. “Artists have told the BBC how their artwork is being stolen from social media and sold for profit online. They claim malicious individuals are finding their art, often with the aid of an automated system known as a bot, and uploading it on to a website where it can be sold on a T-shirt without the artist’s permission.”