NPR: How to protect your privacy when using mental health care apps

NPR: How to protect your privacy when using mental health care apps. “With online mental health services providing a convenient alternative to traditional methods of in-person therapy for many people, NPR asked digital privacy experts to weigh in on what you should know about protecting your privacy when using these types of platforms. The privacy tips here can apply to more than just online therapy services, but experts say these steps can help with privacy related to therapy apps as well.”

Slate: Being a Therapist on Social Media Can Be a Little Traumatic

Slate: Being a Therapist on Social Media Can Be a Little Traumatic. “Since the dawn of the pandemic, mental health content creators have flourished across social media, especially TikTok and Instagram. But they aren’t all equal. Creators with questionable qualifications and intentions have proliferated too, sharing dubious information, outlining symptoms, suggesting that various behaviors indicate all manner of DSM diagnoses, and at times even proffering treatments.”

Psychology Today: The Rise of Social-Media Psychotherapy

Psychology Today: The Rise of Social-Media Psychotherapy. “So, we now have a generation of individuals who are educating themselves about mental health, seeking treatment for their mental health in a more technology-centered culture, and perfectly comfortable discussing personal aspects of their lives on a public forum. It should be no surprise that there are few qualms about sharing a therapy session online for others to see.”

New York Times: We Asked 1,320 Therapists What They’re Hearing From Patients

New York Times: We Asked 1,320 Therapists What They’re Hearing From Patients. “The New York Times asked 1,320 mental health professionals to tell us how their patients were coping as pandemic restrictions eased. General anxiety and depression are the most common reasons patients seek support, but family and relationship issues also dominate therapy conversations. One in four providers said suicidal thoughts were among the top reasons clients were seeking therapy.”

PsyPost: People with social anxiety disorder show improved symptoms and changes in brain activity following virtual reality therapy

PsyPost: People with social anxiety disorder show improved symptoms and changes in brain activity following virtual reality therapy. “In an experiment published in JMIR Mental Health, people with social anxiety disorder showed reduced social anxiety and less negative rumination following a virtual reality based exposure therapy. Moreover, this reduction in symptoms was associated with changes in brain activity when participants judged whether positive words were self-relevant.”

GlobeNewswire: Psychable, the Online Platform for Psychedelic Healthcare, is Live – the Comprehensive Resource Connects Those Seeking Information on Legal Psychedelic-Assisted Therapy Treatment Options With Practitioners in Their Area (PRESS RELEASE)

GlobeNewswire: Psychable, the Online Platform for Psychedelic Healthcare, is Live – the Comprehensive Resource Connects Those Seeking Information on Legal Psychedelic-Assisted Therapy Treatment Options With Practitioners in Their Area (PRESS RELEASE). “Psychable, the online community for people who are interested in legally exploring or offering psychedelic-assisted therapy, has officially launched. Providing thousands of listings for psychedelic practitioners across the U.S., Canada, and international locations, the platform aims to be the most comprehensive and trusted resource for those curious in exploring the legal use of psychedelics as medicine, and offers a community-reviewed, curated database of practitioners available to connect with clients directly through the platform.”

Mashable: On TikTok, mental health creators are confused for therapists. That’s a serious problem.

Mashable: On TikTok, mental health creators are confused for therapists. That’s a serious problem.. “TikTok has a therapy problem. Creators who purport to reduce the stigma around mental health issues may be unintentionally spreading misinformation on the app, where people who post about mental health are easily confused with real professionals making similar content.”

WBAL: Therapy in Color helps connect Black Americans with therapists of color

WBAL: Therapy in Color helps connect Black Americans with therapists of color. “A new website is making it easier than ever for people of color to get specialized mental health help. From nationwide protests to the coronavirus pandemic, mental health issues are at an all-time high. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, Black Americans are 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems than the general population.”

CNN: These therapists are using TikTok to help you get through the pandemic

CNN: These therapists are using TikTok to help you get through the pandemic. “In one 15-second clip on TikTok, clinical psychologist Dr. Julie Smith can be seen dancing while text encourages people not to compare their isolation to others. In another 60-second video, Smith breaks down five ways to tackle anxiety, including slow breathing techniques. Smith, who also uses Instagram and YouTube, joined TikTok last fall because she didn’t see mental health professionals on the short-form video app, which is popular with teens and known for lighthearted content, comedy and dance routines. She hoped to call attention to simple skills people can use to improve their mental health. That goal has arguably only taken on greater urgency in recent months due to the pandemic.”

Jezebel: The Spooky, Loosely Regulated World of Online Therapy

Jezebel: The Spooky, Loosely Regulated World of Online Therapy. “Of all the information the average internet user shares with the technology companies that dominate their lives, health data—and especially mental health data–is some of the most valuable, and controversial: Though social media conditions a person to share every aspect of their being, at every moment, a company automatically telling Snapchat and Pinterest you’re signing up for therapy still feels pretty spooky, even if it’s covered in the fine print.”

DrexelNOW: Is Virtual Reality the Next Big Thing in Art Therapy?

DrexelNOW: Is Virtual Reality the Next Big Thing in Art Therapy?. “The ever-expanding field of virtual reality (VR) has been used in health care settings like physical rehabilitation. It’s also made its way into therapy settings to reduce phobias and delusions. Could creative arts therapies be the next frontier for VR? Researchers from Drexel University’s College of Nursing and Health Professions in the Creative Arts Therapies Department conducted a study to see if VR can be used as an expressive tool in art therapy.”

New York Times: Instagram Therapists Are the New Instagram Poets

New York Times: Instagram Therapists Are the New Instagram Poets. “Despite appeals from the so-called therapy generation, a lot of mental health care remains prohibitively expensive and moderately stigmatized in the United States. Of the nearly 1 in 5 adults in this country who experience mental illness, just over 42 percent received mental health services in 2017. Mental health professionals are seeking to address this issue, in part by doling out advice online.”