University of Central Florida: UCF Researchers Create Global Storm Surge Database

University of Central Florida: UCF Researchers Create Global Storm Surge Database. “The researchers also visualized the data by creating an online map that displays 802 tide gauges from around the world and all relevant data corresponding to each tide gauge covering the entire 1900s and most of the 1800s. Users can click on the tide gauge and download multiple daily maximum surge datasets.”

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Building a Global Storm Database

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Building a Global Storm Database. “A new global database built by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) captures characteristics and rainfall data of strong thunderstorms from the past 20 years. Including storms in both midlatitude and tropical zones is key to capturing how contrasting storm behavior and corresponding precipitation could affect populated regions of the globe.”

EOS: Finding Faces in Hailstorms

EOS: Finding Faces in Hailstorms. “Hail can be among the most damaging of severe weather phenomena, but predicting whether a passing thunderstorm might start spitting pea-sized (or golf ball–sized) hailstones is notoriously difficult. A new approach using machine learning techniques related to facial recognition technology is giving meteorologists a new tool for mapping how various components of a storm might add up to dangerous hail conditions.”

Chasing storm data: machine learning looks for useful data in U.S. thunderstorm reports (Iowa State University)

Iowa State University: Chasing storm data: machine learning looks for useful data in U.S. thunderstorm reports. “When [Bill] Gallus heard campus colleagues from Iowa State’s Theoretical and Applied Data Science research group talk about machine learning, he thought the technology’s data analysis capabilities could help him study and analyze the Storm Reports database. Maybe the computers could find relationships or connections in the reports that could lead to new forecasting tools? Well, not so fast, said scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).”