Hong Kong Free Press: 1989 Tiananmen Massacre online museum blocked in Hong Kong, three weeks after police raid physical site

Hong Kong Free Press: 1989 Tiananmen Massacre online museum blocked in Hong Kong, three weeks after police raid physical site. “The online ‘June 4th Museum,’ preserving the memory of Beijing’s bloody crackdown on protesters in 1989, has become inaccessible via several of Hong Kong’s major telecom providers. It comes less than two months after the site was first launched and three weeks after police confiscated exhibits at a separate, real-life museum in Hong Kong.”

South China Morning Post: Virtual Tiananmen Square museum crowdfunded by Hong Kong vigil organiser launches

South China Morning Post: Virtual Tiananmen Square museum crowdfunded by Hong Kong vigil organiser launches. “The online museum offers a timeline of the 1989 student-led pro-democracy movement in Beijing, including the subsequent crackdown and its aftermath. It also provides a list of those killed, injured and forced to go into exile. The website dedicates a chapter to Hong Kong’s role in backing the student movement and later commemorating the crackdown over the past three decades.” The museum is currently in Chinese only, but more languages are expected.

Los Angeles Times: He tried to commemorate erased history. China detained him, then erased that too

Los Angeles Times: He tried to commemorate erased history. China detained him, then erased that too. “Thousands of politically sensitive cases disappeared last month from China Judgments Online, the public archive. The deletions were first noticed by a Chinese activist with the Twitter handle @SpeechFreedomCN, who has been keeping an archive of speech crime cases. He has tracked more than 2,040 cases, dating to 2013, based on official documentation in China Judgments Online or public security bureaus’ reports on the social media apps Weibo and WeChat.”

The Guardian: Microsoft blocks Bing from showing image results for Tiananmen ‘tank man’

The Guardian: Microsoft blocks Bing from showing image results for Tiananmen ‘tank man’. “Microsoft has blamed human error after its search engine, Bing, blocked image and video results for the phrase ‘tank man’ – a reference to the iconic image of a lone protester facing down tanks during the 1989 protests in Tiananmen Square – on the 32nd anniversary of the military crackdown.”

Nikkei Asian Review: Tiananmen museum seeks funds to preserve crackdown relics online

Nikkei Asian Review: Tiananmen museum seeks funds to preserve crackdown relics online. “The operators of the world’s only museum dedicated to preserving the memory of the June 4, 1989 Tiananmen crackdown have begun a global crowdfunding drive to take their collection online, prodded by the looming national security law Beijing plans to impose in Hong Kong.”