Wired: TikTok Duets Are Reviving the Exquisite Corpse

Wired: TikTok Duets Are Reviving the Exquisite Corpse. “The platform, thanks to its duetting and stitching functions, automates a lot of what the Surrealists were doing. It’s not exactly an exquisite corpse, since TikTok records the entire genealogy of any given work, and there is a want for continuity with what others have contributed before. But there is a similar spirit of spontaneous collaboration, and a kindred quest for the absurd. Grocery Store: A New Musical’s voices are automatic doors and produce misters. They may be singing in harmony, but they’re far off-script from the story Mertzlufft started.”

CNET: How to make a TikTok Duet (on Instagram, too)

CNET: How to make a TikTok Duet (on Instagram, too). “If you’re on TikTok — or have seen TikTok videos reposted elsewhere — you’ve likely seen a Duet. Sometimes TikTok creators film videos specifically designed for other users on the app to add to. They can range from dances to singing songs or lip-syncing songs to viral challenges to blind reacts and more.”

Mother Jones: The TikTok Trend That Has Immigration Lawyers Worried

Mother Jones: The TikTok Trend That Has Immigration Lawyers Worried. “TikTok’s ecosystem of immigration lawyers is a diverse one. There are plenty of zealous advocates attempting to explain in digestible sound bites convoluted, ever-changing policies. There is also potentially misleading content. Many of the advertisements seem to target undocumented Latin American immigrants with strong ties to the United States and few to no existing options for obtaining legal status.”

Daily Beast: Inside the Awful World of Young Landlords on TikTok

Daily Beast: Inside the Awful World of Young Landlords on TikTok. “Left unstated in the get-rich-quick strategies outlined on social media: these investment schemes require someone to be the underdog. Someone has to lose their home to eviction, or rent out a ‘home hacked’ property and support their lifestyle. And the country’s poorest are unlikely to afford down payments on massive, multi-family buildings. Nevertheless, some TikTok users suggest otherwise.”

Las Cruces Sun News: New Mexico State Police’s first TikTok video goes viral

Las Cruces Sun News: New Mexico State Police’s first TikTok video goes viral. “About a month ago, the New Mexico State Police started a TikTok account. Last week, the agency debuted its first video, which is of a female officer getting ready for work. The video of Byanca Castro, a patrol officer based out Las Vegas, N.M., has been viewed more than 400,000 times.”

Mashable: Meet the women killing it on taxidermy TikTok

Mashable: Meet the women killing it on taxidermy TikTok. “Data of taxidermists broken down by gender is hard to come by, but in Pennsylvania, where [Kelly] Brong works, the number of female taxidermists nearly doubled from 5% in 2005 to 9% in 2017. Now, TikTok is helping some women artists not only create their own community, but also to make the art form more approachable and lucrative.”

Mashable: TikTok’s algorithm is sending users down a far-right extremist rabbit hole

Mashable: TikTok’s algorithm is sending users down a far-right extremist rabbit hole. “QAnon. Patriot Party, Oath Keepers. Three Percenters. Videos promoting these far right wing movements are all banned on TikTok. Yet the viral app’s recommendations algorithm keeps pushing accounts that promote these groups and movements anyway. According to a new report by the media monitoring group Media Matters for America, TikTok’s user recommendation algorithm is pushing its users toward accounts with the kinds of far-right views that are supposedly prohibited on the platform.”

Rest of World: TikTok is repeating Facebook’s mistakes in Myanmar

Rest of World: TikTok is repeating Facebook’s mistakes in Myanmar. “Activists and experts told Rest of World that TikTok’s failures were distressingly familiar to anyone acquainted with how Facebook was used to help drive an ethnic-cleansing campaign in Myanmar in the 2010s. Members of the Myanmar military, known as the Tatmadaw, spread misinformation across the platform, stoking division, hatred, and, eventually, violence. In 2018, United Nations human rights experts said that unchecked hate speech on Facebook contributed to the genocide against the country’s Rohingya minority.”

New York Times: How Crying on TikTok Sells Books

New York Times: How Crying on TikTok Sells Books. “An app known for serving up short videos on everything from dance moves to fashion tips, cooking tutorials and funny skits, TikTok is not an obvious destination for book buzz. But videos made mostly by women in their teens and 20s have come to dominate a growing niche under the hashtag #BookTok, where users recommend books, record time lapses of themselves reading, or sob openly into the camera after an emotionally crushing ending.”

CNET: TikTok is full of homemade lip glosses. But should you buy them?

CNET: TikTok is full of homemade lip glosses. But should you buy them?. “The glosses are eye-catching, handmade and cheap — some selling for as low as $2.99 a tube — making them a hot commodity among makeup connoisseurs on TikTok. Comments sections are flooded with people around the world hoping to get their hands on the products. But these videos, which have collectively garnered over 700 million views on the short-form video app, can understandably give some people pause. How sanitary is the creation and packaging of these glosses? What ingredients are going into these products, and how safe are they for your skin and body?”

Neowin: TikTok will force you to see personalized ads from April 15

Neowin: TikTok will force you to see personalized ads from April 15. “Currently, TikTok lets you choose whether you’d like to see general ads or personalized ones that are based on your in-app activities like the videos you’ve liked and ads you’ve interacted with on the platform. The goal is to help businesses reach more consumers. Starting next month, these options may change ‘and the ads you’ll see may start to be based on what you do on TikTok,’ according to a notice shown on the app.”

CNET: YouTube’s TikTok rival, Shorts, starts rolling out in US

CNET: YouTube’s TikTok rival, Shorts, starts rolling out in US. “YouTube is rolling out Shorts, its response to the TikTok phenomenon, in the US starting Thursday and continuing over the next ‘several weeks.’ This suite of creator tools for making short, vertical, looping videos is expected to be available to all creators on YouTube in the US, whether they have millions of channel subscribers or none at all.”