SJX: Introducing the Neuchâtel Observatory Chronometer Database

SJX: Introducing the Neuchâtel Observatory Chronometer Database. “Put together by Dr Christian Müller, the Observatory Chronometer Database (OCD) is a comprehensive compilation of all 3356 wristwatch movements ever submitted to the Neuchâtel Observatory for testing between the years 1945 to 1967 – the golden age of mechanical wristwatch chronometry. Then known as the Observatoire Astronomique et Chronometrique de Neuchatel, as it was described on historical chronometer certificates, the Neuchâtel Observatory conducted annual contests for various classes of timekeepers, from pocket watches to wristwatches, both mechanical and quartz (the OCD only covers mechanical wristwatches).”

CNET: Facebook seeks to redefine time with ‘flicks’

CNET: Facebook seeks to redefine time with ‘flicks’. “If Facebook gets its way, maybe the next time you want your friend to hold the door for a second, you’ll say, ‘Hang on for 705,600,000 flicks.’ Well, OK, you probably won’t. But you could, because Facebook introduced a new unit of time on Monday called the flick. The company thinks it’ll be useful for programmers if not for talking to your pal while you run back for your keys.”

Phys.org: How social media has synchronized human civilization

Phys.org: How social media has synchronized human civilization. “Human activity, whether commercial or social, contains patterns and moments of synchronicity. In recent years, social media like Twitter has provided an unprecedented volume of data on the daily activities of humans all over the world. Observing this activity on the scale of a city, a continent, or the globe reveals the patterns. In a paper published by the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, researchers at the New England Complex Systems Institute (NECSI) have observed a new pattern of synchronized activity: a simultaneous peak of Twitter activity stretching across half the planet, from Europe and Africa to Asia and Oceania.”

Chrome Extension Times Your Web Site Visits

Want to time how long spend on various Web sites? Then you’ve got more nerve than me. Also, you need this Chrome extension. “TimeYourWeb has a few ways to see how much time you’ve spent on a site. While you’re on a page, the extension icon in your toolbar will show you how long you’ve spent on a given tab so far, so you can see if you’re wasting too much time at a glance.”

A Roundup of Tools for Making Timelines

Hey! Joyce Valenza’s got a nifty roundup of time-lining tools. “Timelines are a perfect tool for inquiry projects. They force students to see contexts; to make critical decisions about relative importance; to make connections among people, events and movements; to visualize history and processes; to discover patterns and sequences; to examine cause and effect; and to juxtapose content from across disciplines and media.”