TechCrunch: A security researcher commandeered a country’s expired top-level domain to save it from hackers

TechCrunch: A security researcher commandeered a country’s expired top-level domain to save it from hackers . “The domain — scpt-network.com — was one of two nameservers for the .cd country code top-level domain, assigned to the Democratic Republic of Congo. If it fell into the wrong hands, an attacker could redirect millions of unknowing internet users to rogue websites of their choosing. Clearly, a domain of such importance wasn’t supposed to expire; someone in the Congolese government probably forgot to pay for its renewal. Luckily, expired domains don’t disappear immediately. Instead, the clock started on a grace period for its government owners to buy back the domain before it was sold to someone else.”

Android Police: 🍕Google adds pizza.new and 60 more ‘.new’ domain shortcuts🍕

Android Police: 🍕Google adds pizza.new and 60 more ‘.new’ domain shortcuts🍕. “It’s been two years since Google started introducing .new domain shortcuts to speed the creation of Drive documents, and one year since it opened the .new TLD to third-party companies. As more and more shortcuts joined the fold, Google published a directory of all domains, which stood at a little less than 200 in July. Now they’re up to 250 approximately, with some useful and other questionable additions.”

Google Blog: Highlights from the first year of . dev

Google Blog: Highlights from the first year of . dev. “A year ago, our Google Registry team launched .dev—a top-level domain (TLD) for developers, designers, technical writers, and technology enthusiasts. This new TLD gave people the chance to register memorable domain names that can be hard to find on older domains, with a descriptive ending that’s especially relevant to them.”

The Register: Four months, $1bn… and ICANN still hasn’t decided whether to approve .org sale with just 11 days left to go

The Register: Four months, $1bn… and ICANN still hasn’t decided whether to approve .org sale with just 11 days left to go. “In 11 days, DNS overseer ICANN is supposed to rule on the $1.13bn purchase of a critical piece of the internet – the .org registry with its 10 million domain names. But ICANN has yet to even decide what criteria it will use decide whether to green-light the takeover.”

ZDNet: The for-profit takeover of the non-profit ‘.org’ top-level domain

ZDNet: The for-profit takeover of the non-profit ‘.org’ top-level domain. “At first glance, the proposed deal makes little sense. The Internet Society is trying to sell the non-profit Public Interest Registry (PIR), the registry for the ‘.org’ top-level domain (TLD), to the new private-equity firm Ethos Capital for $1.135 billion. There are about 10.5 million .org domains, and most — but not all — are non-profits. Where’s the money? “

BusinessWire: New .gay Top-Level Domain Champions LGBTQ Nonprofits and Online Safety (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: New .gay Top-Level Domain Champions LGBTQ Nonprofits and Online Safety (PRESS RELEASE). “Domain registry Top Level Design proudly announces the launch of generic Top Level Domain (gTLD) ‘.gay’ after a near decade-long application process. The .gay domain extension represents a historic step forward that signals support of LGBTQ people, causes, and businesses.”

Wired: The Digital Colonialism Behind . tv and . ly

Wired: The Digital Colonialism Behind .tv and .ly. “As companies increasingly turn to quirky extensions in place of .com, these questions about ownership and national resources are all the more pressing. The nation of Tuvalu (pop: 10,000), for example, has seen a rapid rise in the popularity of its .tv domain—it’s now up to 512,000 registrations—after the Amazon-owned streaming service Twitch started using it in its own URL: Twitch.tv. Tuvalu’s situation is more nuanced than Niue’s. The nation only discovered that it had a top-level domain when, in 1995, it received a fax from an American offering to help market it. When Tuvaluans investigated, they discovered that the .tv domain had already been assigned to an American computer programmer.”

Mashable: Sale of .org domain registry delayed by California attorney general

Mashable: Sale of .org domain registry delayed by California attorney general. “California Attorney General Xavier Becerra sent a letter to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) demanding more information about the private equity takeover of the .org domain registry. The attorney general is seeking answers to 35 questions concerning the sale as well as documents sent between ICANN, private equity firm Ethos Capital, and Public Interest Registry (PIR), which manages the .org domain.”

EFF: ICANN Needs To Ask More Questions About the Sale of .ORG

EFF: ICANN Needs To Ask More Questions About the Sale of .ORG. “Over 21,000 people, 660 organizations, and now six Members of Congress have asked ICANN, the organization that regulates the Internet’s domain name system, to halt the $1.135 billion deal that would hand control over PIR, the .ORG domain registry, to private equity. There are crucial reasons this sale is facing significant backlash from the nonprofit and NGO communities who make the .ORG domain their online home, and perhaps none of them are more concerning than the speed of the deal and the dangerous lack of transparency that’s accompanied it.”

The Register: ICANN finally reveals who’s behind purchase of .org: It’s ███████ and ██████ – you don’t need to know any more

The Register: ICANN finally reveals who’s behind purchase of .org: It’s ███████ and ██████ – you don’t need to know any more. “DNS overlord ICANN has finally released additional details over the proposed sale of the .org internet registry to a private equity firm – details that raise more questions than answers. Key among these peculiarities is that they don’t name who will end up in charge of the billion-dollar entity that oversee 10 million .org internet addresses, including many of the world’s largest non-profits and charities.”

The Verge: ICANN’s founding chairman joins the battle to keep .org out of private hands

The Verge: ICANN’s founding chairman joins the battle to keep .org out of private hands. “The new non-profit cooperative corporation, officially called the Cooperative Corporation of .ORG Registrants, is led by many people who currently have or have had influence over the inner workings of the Internet, including Esther Dyson, the founding chairman of ICANN (the non-profit that oversees domain names on the internet), Katherine Maher, the CEO of the Wikimedia Foundation (the parent company of Wikipedia), and William Woodcock, the executive director of Packet Clearing House (an organization that helps support internet infrastructure and the domain name system).”