Mashable: The real impact of not having been touched in months

Mashable: The real impact of not having been touched in months. “What makes the coronavirus pandemic unlike any other collective tragedy is that we can’t commiserate together. Post-layoff drinks at a dive bar near the office; embracing someone you haven’t seen in months; pats on the back — these are seemingly small comforts that have morphed into luxuries in the past few months. While there are many things I miss about the Before, these touches of comfort are high on the list. As we round the corner into another month of social distancing I find myself thinking about touch constantly. One look at dating apps or porn sites and I know I’m not alone in that.”

Coronavirus: Why going without physical touch is so hard (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Why going without physical touch is so hard. “Milestone birthdays are being celebrated over video calls, elderly people are talking to neighbours through windows and those who live alone are going without any human touch at all, as they obey the government guidelines to stay at home and keep 2m (6ft) apart from others. But touch is ‘really fundamental’ for humans, says Prof Robin Dunbar, evolutionary psychologist at the University of Oxford – and going without it weakens our close relationships.”

Phys .org: New tech puts virtual sense of touch at our fingertips

Phys .org: New tech puts virtual sense of touch at our fingertips. “The system, developed by researchers at Northwestern University and described in the journal Nature, incorporates 32 individually programmable actuators—a device that emits electric impulses or vibrations—which are embedded into a pliable material made from silicone that adheres to the skin. Controlled by a wireless touchscreen such as a smartphone or tablet, each actuator—the size of a small coin—vibrates to create the perception of touch. The user can control the pressure and the pattern of the sensation.”

National Research University Higher School of Economics: Emotions from Touch

National Research University Higher School of Economics: Emotions from Touch. “Touching different types of surfaces may incur certain emotions. This was the conclusion made by psychologists in a recent empirical study. Previously, emotional perception was generally studied in relation to visual and audial modalities. The researchers looked at how humans react to what they see or hear. This fresh research has helped to create the first ever database of textures, the tangible perception of which is associated with happiness, fear, surprise, disgust, anger, or sadness. The study’s results were published in the journal Consciousness and Cognition.”