Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: A public database significantly undercounts former drug labs in Pa. Here’s why homebuyers and renters should care.

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: A public database significantly undercounts former drug labs in Pa. Here’s why homebuyers and renters should care.. “The only online federal database that allows people to see whether their home or property was contaminated with toxic chemicals used to make drugs like methamphetamine significantly undercounts the number of sites in Pennsylvania, according to data obtained by Spotlight PA. Similar reporting discrepancies exist in neighboring states, but Pennsylvania is one of several nationwide that do not have laws or guidelines outlining how contaminated properties should be cleaned or when they are safe to live in, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.”

Revealed: more than 120,000 US sites feared to handle harmful PFAS ‘forever’ chemicals (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Revealed: more than 120,000 US sites feared to handle harmful PFAS ‘forever’ chemicals. “The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified more than 120,000 locations around the US where people may be exposed to a class of toxic ‘forever chemicals’ associated with various cancers and other health problems that is a frightening tally four times larger than previously reported, according to data obtained by the Guardian.”

Chemical & Engineering News: EU releases database of toxic chemicals in products

Chemical & Engineering News: EU releases database of toxic chemicals in products. “The new database contains information provided by about 6,000 companies, which are required to notify [European Chemicals Agency (ECHA)] if they market products that contain ‘substances of very high concern’ at concentrations of more than 0.1% by weight. Lead compounds, found in products such as batteries, automotive parts, and crystalware, are the most common substances in the database.”

EurekAlert: Is your drinking water toxic? This app may help you find out

EurekAlert: Is your drinking water toxic? This app may help you find out. “Exposure to hydraulic fracturing fluid in drinking water has been shown to increase the risk of respiratory problems, premature births, congenital heart defects, and other medical problems. But not all wells are created equal…. Now, a new, interactive tool created by Penn Medicine researchers allows community members and scientists to find out which toxins may be lurking in their drinking water as a result of fracking.”

CNN: These 9 hand sanitizers may contain a potentially fatal ingredient, FDA warns

CNN: These 9 hand sanitizers may contain a potentially fatal ingredient, FDA warns. “The US Food and Drug Administration is advising consumers not to use hand sanitizer products manufactured by Eskbiochem SA due to the potential presence of a toxic chemical. The FDA has discovered methanol, a substance that can be toxic when absorbed through skin or ingested, in samples of Lavar Gel and CleanCare No Germ hand sanitizers, both produced by the Mexican company.”

Phys .org: Can I mix those chemicals? There’s an app for that!

Phys .org: Can I mix those chemicals? There’s an app for that!. “Improperly mixed chemicals cause a shocking number of fires, explosions, and injuries in laboratories, businesses, and homes each year. A new open source computer program called ChemStor developed by engineers at the University of California, Riverside, can prevent these dangerous situations by telling users if it is unsafe to mix certain chemicals.”

Florida International University: Researchers develop a database of DNA damage

Florida International University: Researchers develop a database of DNA damage. “The frequent exposure to chemicals in the environment and diet leads to the chemical modification of DNA, resulting in the addition of two or more distinct molecules—or adducts— to DNA. Some DNA adducts can induce mutations during cell division, and when occurring in critical regions of the genome, lead to disease, including cancer. A team of researchers are developing and curating a comprehensive international database of DNA adduct standards.”

Delaware Online: Look up what chemicals are near your home

Delaware Online: Look up what chemicals are near your home. “Tourism and agriculture may be the dominant industries in Delaware, but chemical production and related processes remain at the heart of some businesses in the state. There are at least 72 facilities throughout the state that handled hazardous materials or were permitted to emit certain levels of chemicals into the air land and water in recent years. Type in an address to see how close you might be to those sources.”

The Star: U of T Indigenous-led lab creates new app for reporting pollution in Chemical Valley

The Star: U of T Indigenous-led lab creates new app for reporting pollution in Chemical Valley. “Vanessa and Beze Gray run an annual ‘Toxic Tour’ of the siblings’ childhood home — Aamjiwnaang First Nation. The 2,500 acres of ancestral land is wedged on three sides by sprawling petroleum and chemical companies that, for generations, have discharged pollutants into Canada’s Chemical Valley.”

Chemistry World: Chemical safety database gets American Chemical Society and Iupac backing

Chemistry World: Chemical safety database gets American Chemical Society and Iupac backing. “A public database of hazardous chemical reactions launched in March 2017 by the US non-profit group Pistoia Alliance has secured the backing of the American Chemical Society (ACS) and its Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) – a massive index of research papers and compound structures. Pistoia created this Chemical Safety Library (CSL) as a tool for researchers to share and learn about lab accidents and thereby prevent repeat incidents, and these two new partners will develop and launch an updated, more user-friendly version of the database.”

University of California San Francisco: Chemical Exposure Web Tool Defines Risks Faced by Millions of California Women

University of California San Francisco: Chemical Exposure Web Tool Defines Risks Faced by Millions of California Women. “The tool, which was developed by researchers at UC San Francisco and the California Department of Public Health’s Occupational Health Branch, is part of an ongoing study focused on understanding potential breast cancer risks related to workplace chemical exposures. Users can search the database by ethnicity/race, age, and occupation to see risk information on more than a thousand chemicals, sorted into 24 chemical groups, as well as which chemicals are likely to be present in various occupations.”

Hindustan Times: Now, a database of harmful chemicals in everyday items

Hindustan Times: Now, a database of harmful chemicals in everyday items. “Chennai-based Institute of Mathematical Sciences (IMSc) has created an online database — Database of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and their Toxicity Profiles (DEDuCT) — of 686 endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), many of which are present in everyday items.” The news article does not appear to have a link to the resource. It’s available at https://cb.imsc.res.in/deduct/ .

EWG: PFAS Chemicals Must Be Regulated as a Class, Not One by One (Environmental Working Group)

EWG: EWG: PFAS Chemicals Must Be Regulated as a Class, Not One by One. “The known extent of contamination of American communities with the toxic fluorinated compounds known as PFAS continues to grow at an alarming rate, with no end in sight. As of March 2019, at least 610 locations in 43 states are known to be contaminated, including drinking water systems serving an estimated 19 million people.”