The Ohio State University: The deadly impact of urban streets that look like highways

The Ohio State University: The deadly impact of urban streets that look like highways. “Serious auto crashes in urban areas are more likely on city streets that look to drivers like highways, new research suggests. The study used a novel approach: Ohio State University researchers applied machine learning techniques to analyze more than 240,000 images of road segments in Columbus, Ohio, taken from Google Street View. The goal was to see what the roads looked like to drivers and whether that was linked to serious and deadly crashes.”

Jalopnik: Pandemic Road Rage Is Experiencing An ‘Explosion’

Jalopnik: Pandemic Road Rage Is Experiencing An ‘Explosion’. “For all the money we, as a nation, spend on policing, you might think we’d have things like ‘databases on violent and deadly crime,’ but you’d be wrong! The American police apparatus thrives on funding without accountability, and that seems to be holding true for road rage, as the New York Times details.”

Our most dangerous streets: Huge new collision database points to Toronto’s postwar suburbs (Toronto Star)

Toronto Star: Our most dangerous streets: Huge new collision database points to Toronto’s postwar suburbs. “A Star analysis of a huge new database of Toronto traffic collisions is shining a bright spotlight on a distinctly suburban problem. The new data set, much larger and more complete than any previously available records, offers a comprehensive account of nearly 500,000 collisions reported to Toronto police between 2014 and 2021, most mapped to the nearest intersection.”

Los Angeles Times: Car crash deaths have surged during COVID-19 pandemic. Here’s why

Los Angeles Times: Car crash deaths have surged during COVID-19 pandemic. Here’s why. “It was a tally that shocked the experts: 38,680 deaths on U.S. roadways last year, the most since 2007, even though pandemic precautions had dramatically reduced driving…. He was wrong. The latest evidence suggests that after decades of safety gains, the pandemic has made U.S. drivers more reckless — more likely to speed, drink or use drugs and leave their seat belts unbuckled.”

Maine Government News: Maine State Archives Shares Railroad Accident Report of the Death of Civil Rights Leader James Weldon Johnson

Maine Government News: Maine State Archives Shares Railroad Accident Report of the Death of Civil Rights Leader James Weldon Johnson. “The original report of the 1938 railroad accident that killed famed Civil Rights leader James Weldon Johnson in Wiscasset, which is held by the Maine State Archives, is now available for viewing on DigitalMaine.com…. James Weldon Johnson was a famous author and Civil Rights activist during the early twentieth century. He is most famous for writing the lyrics to ‘Lift Every Voice and Sing,’ commonly referred to as the Black National Anthem.”

NBC News: 5 hurt, including 2 officers, after crash at anti-vaccine protest in San Francisco

NBC News: 5 hurt, including 2 officers, after crash at anti-vaccine protest in San Francisco. “Five people were injured, including two California Highway Patrol officers, in a chain-reaction crash Thursday at an anti-vaccination protest in San Francisco, authorities said. The crash occurred shortly before 6 p.m. at the San Francisco entrance to the Golden Gate Bridge, where there was a protest billed as a ‘nationwide walkout’ against government-mandated vaccinations against Covid-19, California Highway Patrol spokesman Andrew Barclay said.”

Associated Press: US cites ‘crisis’ as road deaths rise 18% in first-half 2021

Associated Press: US cites ‘crisis’ as road deaths rise 18% in first-half 2021. “The number of U.S. traffic deaths in the first six months of 2021 hit 20,160, the highest first-half total since 2006, the government reported Thursday, a sign of growing reckless driving during the coronavirus pandemic. The estimated number was 18.4% higher than the first half of last year, prompting Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg to call the increase an unacceptable crisis.”

Vox: America’s car crash epidemic

Vox: America’s car crash epidemic. “Even as Americans have been driving less in the past year or so, car crash deaths (including both occupants of vehicles and pedestrians) have surged. Cars killed 42,060 people in 2020, up from 39,107 in 2019, according to a preliminary estimate from the National Safety Council (NSC), a nonprofit that focuses on eliminating preventable deaths. (NSC’s numbers are typically higher than those reported by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) because the NSC includes car deaths in private spaces like driveways and parking lots, and it counts deaths that occur up to a year after a crash.)”

NHTSA: Traffic deaths rise again as drivers take risks (Associated Press)

Associated Press: NHTSA: Traffic deaths rise again as drivers take risks. “The increase in traffic fatalities is a continuation of a trend that started in 2020. In June, the [National Highway Traffic Safety Administration] reported that traffic deaths rose 7% last year to 38,680, the most since 2007. That increase came even as the number of miles traveled by vehicle fell 13% from 2019 due to the coronavirus pandemic.”

Angry Residents, Abrupt Stops: Waymo Vehicles Are Still Causing Problems in Arizona (Phoenix New Times)

Phoenix New Times: Angry Residents, Abrupt Stops: Waymo Vehicles Are Still Causing Problems in Arizona. “A driverless Waymo vehicle caused a crash in October by stopping unexpectedly in the middle of the road, displaying a technical malfunction the Google-related company claims is rare. In another 2020 incident, a police officer claimed a sudden stop by a Waymo vehicle caused a rear-end collision, but the officer was cited. The incidents are detailed in newly released police reports obtained by Phoenix New Times that shed fresh light on the function and operations of the driverless vehicles, which are often cloaked in secrecy.”

BBC: Woman falls from car on M25 filming Snapchat video

BBC: Woman falls from car on M25 filming Snapchat video. “A woman fell out of a moving car on the M25 while leaning out of the window to film a video for Snapchat. She fell from the car into a ‘live lane’ between junction six and the Clacket Lane Services at 01:30 BST, Surrey Police traffic officers tweeted. The woman was not badly hurt but police said it was lucky ‘she wasn’t seriously injured or killed’.”

KHN: Fewer Traffic Collisions During Shutdown Means Longer Waits For Organ Donations

KHN: Fewer Traffic Collisions During Shutdown Means Longer Waits For Organ Donations. “On Day Two of the San Francisco Bay Area’s stay-at-home orders in March, Nohemi Jimenez got into her car in San Pablo, California, waved goodbye to her 3-year-old son and drove to her regular Wednesday dialysis appointment. The roads were deserted. No traffic. Jimenez, 30, said it is hard to admit what she thought next: No traffic meant no car accidents. And that meant she’d be on the waiting list for a kidney transplant even longer.”