Brown University: With new federal grant, Brown to host training institute based on digital scholarship expertise

Brown University: With new federal grant, Brown to host training institute based on digital scholarship expertise . “The institute, called Born-Digital Scholarly Publishing: Resources and Road Maps, will train 15 under-resourced scholars from a variety of institutions, disciplines and backgrounds, equipping them with the skills they need to develop digital scholarship intended for publication by a university press. Over three weeks of virtual and in-person sessions, the scholars will learn, among other things, how to use open-source tools and platforms, how to manage large-scale projects, and how and when to reach out to top-level publishing industry contacts.”

Penn State Collegian: Penn State student-made database Éclaireur seeks to help ballet dancers further their careers

Penn State Collegian: Penn State student-made database Éclaireur seeks to help ballet dancers further their careers. “Dancers on the website who are looking for programs can search using factors like dates they are available, the location and their tuition budget… Some of the other search factors include in-person or online programs, as well as housing options.” I couldn’t find the actual URL for the database anywhere in the article! It’s https://www.eclaireur.info/ . The site is not finished yet and I couldn’t get some of the searches to work. But there’s already plenty here to browse.

Mashable: Meet the chatbot that simulates a teen experiencing a mental health crisis

Mashable: Meet the chatbot that simulates a teen experiencing a mental health crisis. “In digital conversation, Riley is a young person who is trying to come out as genderqueer. When you message Riley, they’ll offer brief replies to open-ended questions, sprinkle ellipses throughout when saying something difficult, and type in lowercase, though they’ll capitalize a word or two for emphasis. Riley’s humanness is impressive given that they’re a chatbot driven by artificial intelligence to accomplish a unique goal: simulate what it’s like to talk to a young person in crisis so that volunteer counselors can become skilled at interacting with them and practice asking about thoughts of suicide.”

Washington Post: World’s fastest blind athlete and his running partner try to stay in sync as they remain apart

Washington Post: World’s fastest blind athlete and his running partner try to stay in sync as they remain apart. “The relationship between David Brown and Jerome Avery is as unique as they come in the sports world. Avery has been by Brown’s side for all of his most successful moments. They have been literally tethered together as they have sprinted down the track, legs pumping and arms swinging in perfect rhythm. Brown, 27, is the fastest blind sprinter on the planet and the first to run 100 meters in under 11 seconds. Avery, 41, serves as his eyes on the track. As Brown’s running guide, Avery sprints right next to him in training and competitions, escorting him from the starting blocks to the finish line…. Over the past four years, the two have been preparing for the Tokyo Paralympics, but their training has been upended by the novel coronavirus pandemic. […]

SelectScience: Online ventilator training in 30 minutes to help doctors and nurses care for COVID-19 patients

SelectScience: Online ventilator training in 30 minutes to help doctors and nurses care for COVID-19 patients. “The new online tool, developed by Imperial College London, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and Fundamental VR, allows these redeployed clinicians to gain the key knowledge they need for ventilating patients in 30 minutes. The training consists of a short how-to video that teaches the essentials of operating ventilators. Clinicians can use the tool on their smartphone at home or in real-time as they care for patients, enabling them to begin running ventilators immediately under the supervision of an intensive care consultant. It can be accessed for free by any clinician across the world, regardless of health system or specialism.”

Engadget: Google tests VR as a replacement for dull training videos

Engadget: Google tests VR as a replacement for dull training videos. “We’ve heard about medical professionals using VR to augment their suites for years, but Google is testing its fit in the broader workplace, starting with employment’s least fun experience: Training. The company’s Daydream Labs hosted an experiment to see if hypothetical new hires learned better by watching training videos or donning a VR headset and walking through simulations — and it turns out, immersive education does a better job. For this single trial, anyway.”