Museum calls for key-use: Will make mega-collection digital (TV 2 Lorry)

I am translating both the headline and the pull quote from Danish using Google Translate. Apologies for any errors. TV 2 Lorry: Museum calls for key-use: Will make mega-collection digital. “Currently, approximately 4,000 butterflies have been photographed and digitized. But all the small print on the tiny handwritten labels, with information about the butterfly, must also be entered. The mini labels, which are not larger than a nail, are placed on the needle under each butterfly in the collection.” The project is being administered by Zooniverse. I went to the project side and did one butterfly with minimal difficulty (I had a little trouble reading a handwritten label in Danish.) Mostly the project is asking you if labels are there, what the dates are, etc.

University of Rochester: Seward Family Digital Archive project tops $1 million in grant money

University of Rochester: Seward Family Digital Archive project tops $1 million in grant money. “The project, a collaboration between the University’s Department of History, the River Campus Libraries’ department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, and the Digital Scholarship Lab, brings together students in the humanities and computer science, residents of retirement communities, and retired volunteers from the greater Rochester area to help transcribe the thousands of Seward family letters, all written in Victorian-era cursive handwriting.”

Distant Librarian: First look at NVivo Transcription

The Distant Librarian: First look at NVivo Transcription. “Almost exactly a year ago I took a quick look at three automated transcription tools, and today there’s another one to add to the mix, though this one’s not free. NVivo has launched an automated transcription service and I’m impressed! I uploaded the same audio clip I used in last year’s shootout, a 40-second snippet from the inauguration of George W. Bush, and here’s what NVivo made of it…”

CNET: Google Slides can now automatically transcribe your speech into captions

CNET: Google Slides can now automatically transcribe your speech into captions. “Google’s G Suite is adding automated closed captions to Google Slides, the company said Monday. The feature will roll out to users beginning this week. It works by accessing your computer’s microphone to pick up on what you’re saying during a presentation. It then transcribes your speech as captions, which appear on the slides you’re presenting in real time.”

University of Virginia: You Can Help Put Julian Bond’s Papers In An Online Archive

University of Virginia: You Can Help Put Julian Bond’s Papers In An Online Archive. “Civil rights icon Julian Bond fought for social justice and equality from the time he co-founded the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in 1960 until his death in 2015. In between those years he served in the Georgia legislature, co-founded the Southern Poverty Law Center, served as chairman of the NAACP, engaged in political activism on various fronts – and taught more than 5,000 students as a University of Virginia professor. Now the University is embarking on a project to make his remarkable collection of documents accessible to the world through a crowdsourced transcription effort. #TranscribeBond is the first stage in the ultimate production of an online, digital edition.”

Penn Today: Reclaiming a Fragmented History

Penn Today: Reclaiming a fragmented history . “Harnessing the power of human cooperation, digital humanities scholars at Penn Libraries are orchestrating an epic effort to sort and transcribe handwriting on thousands of documents discarded hundreds of years ago. Through an innovative new website built by the Penn team in collaboration with Zooniverse, an online platform for crowdsourced research, citizen scholars can help analyze the digitized texts, which are written in five Hebrew and three Arabic scripts, some of them exceedingly rare.”

New York Public Library: Unlocking the Record of American Creativity—with Your Help

The New York Public Library apparently posted this on March 30 and good heavens, how did I miss it? Unlocking the Record of American Creativity—with Your Help. “The New York Public Library (NYPL) is embarking on a pilot project to extract the data from a publication known as the Catalog of Copyright Entries, published annually by the United States Copyright Office. The volumes have already been digitized and are freely available through the Internet Archive; our project aims to extract and parse the data contained in the records in order to create a searchable database that will aid copyright research.”