Moving History: Ronald J Sullivan Photography Collection

Moving History: Ronald J Sullivan Photography Collection. “Ronald J. Sullivan, an amateur photographer and avid railfan and bus enthusiast, documented Chicago-area transportation and the city’s changing streetscapes over the course of more than five decades in this collection comprising over 1100 photographs and slides, dating from 1946-2000. He supplemented hundreds of original photographs, the bulk of the collection, with slides and photos that he collected, creating a record of Chicago’s transit history.”

Arizona State University: New data shows impact of COVID-19 on transportation

Arizona State University: New data shows impact of COVID-19 on transportation. “Just over a year ago, governments around the world issued stay-at-home orders, significantly changing day-to-day lives in an instant. Working from home, postponing travel, having groceries delivered to front doors and ordering ‘to go’ at restaurants are just a few ways many habits have changed. But which of these changes are likely to be maintained in a post-COVID-19 world?”

Washington Post: Metro budget cuts weekend service, half of bus routes and closes 19 stations amid dire financial forecast

Washington Post: Metro budget cuts weekend service, half of bus routes and closes 19 stations amid dire financial forecast. “Metro is proposing the elimination of weekend rail service in its budget for the first time as the transit agency’s financial struggles deepen amid the coronavirus pandemic. The drastic action is one of several deep cuts Metro officials say they will have to make to survive the next fiscal year as fare revenue forecasts appear bleak and Congress remains unable to reach an agreement on a coronavirus relief package that could include aid to transit agencies.”

‘An end to the New York way of life’: MTA proposes catastrophic service cuts amid COVID-19 budget crunch (New York Daily News)

New York Daily News: ‘An end to the New York way of life’: MTA proposes catastrophic service cuts amid COVID-19 budget crunch. “A 40% cut in weekday subway service and layoffs of more than 9,000 transit workers are on the table as MTA honchos battle a COVID-19 financial catastrophe, the Daily News has learned. ‘This would absolutely be an end to the New York way of life,’ said Andrew Albert, the non-voting rider advocate on the MTA board.”

Washington Post: Metro considers buyouts to stave off 1,400 layoffs due to pandemic-created financial crisis

Washington Post: Metro considers buyouts to stave off 1,400 layoffs due to pandemic-created financial crisis. “Metro plans to offer buyouts to avoid having to lay off 1,400 employees as it searches for ways to cut more than $176 million from its pandemic-ravaged budget. The transit agency’s board on Thursday will consider offering retirement-eligible employees a bonus to quit so Metro can freeze or eliminate their positions and save jobs for younger, less expensive workers.”

Phys .org: Pandemic has surprising impacts on public transit demand

Phys .org: Pandemic has surprising impacts on public transit demand. “The COVID-19 pandemic had surprising effects on demand for public transit in American cities, new research suggests. While demand for public transit dropped about 73% across the country after the pandemic hit, the reduction didn’t impact all cities equally, according to the study, which analyzed activity data from a widely used public transit navigation app.”

Cumbria’s M6: Photo archive shows motorway at 50 (BBC)

BBC: Cumbria’s M6: Photo archive shows motorway at 50. “It is one of the highest stretches of motorway in the country, covering 36 miles (57.9km) between Lancaster and Penrith. The road, which incorporates the Lune Gorge, was opened on 23 October 1970. Photographs of the construction of the motorway, by John Laing Construction Ltd, have been preserved in a special Historic England archive.”

Plague Comforts: Empty Streets (Mother Jones)

Mother Jones: Plague Comforts: Empty Streets. “After the coronavirus paralyzed New York City in March, the only part of my life that became more pleasant was riding my bike. For a moment, empty streets replaced cars parked in bike lanes, cars running red lights, cars blaring their horns for no discernible reason. On most days when I rode, I felt free. I no longer envisioned myself ensnared in the wheels of a box truck or flattened against the pavement by a charter bus that had run a red. Instead, I entertained myself, in this socially distanced reality, by riding to Rockaway Beach, or Kissena Park, or eerily silent Times Square with a clear mind.”

New York Times: Amtrak Chief Pleads for Nearly $5 Billion to Survive Pandemic

New York Times: Amtrak Chief Pleads for Nearly $5 Billion to Survive Pandemic. “Amtrak’s chief executive, William J. Flynn, urged House lawmakers on Wednesday to provide $4.9 billion for the national passenger rail agency, warning that additional cuts to its service and work force would be needed to ‘stave off bankruptcy’ if Congress did not provide any further emergency funding.”

The Next Web: Coronavirus has changed travel in European cities for good — here’s how

The Next Web: Coronavirus has changed travel in European cities for good — here’s how . “At a recent Cities Today Institute roundtable, cities across Europe told a consistent story – public transport ridership is down between 60 and 90 percent on pre-coronavirus levels and capacity is reduced due to social distancing, while private car usage is beginning to climb once again. With revenues from media, parking and other taxes also slashed, this is adding up to a perfect storm of looming congestion and decimated budgets.”

CityLab: In Japan and France, Riding Transit Looks Surprisingly Safe

CityLab: In Japan and France, Riding Transit Looks Surprisingly Safe. “Between May 9 and June 3, 150 clusters of new coronavirus cases emerged in France, according to the country’s national public health body. Defined as three cases or more of Covid-19 linked by contact, these clusters occurred largely in the sort of places you might predict they would: healthcare facilities, workplaces and homeless shelters — all sites where people mix in enclosed spaces for long periods of time and, in the case of hospitals, where people who are already infected are likely to congregate. What was striking however, was the number of clusters associated with public transit: There weren’t any. For almost a month, not a single Covid-19 cluster had emerged on France’s six metro systems, 26 tram and light rail networks or numerous urban bus routes.”

Phys .org: Researchers aim to help cities prioritize interventions for public transit

Phys .org: Researchers aim to help cities prioritize interventions for public transit. “The New York City Subway—which, under normal circumstances, serves 5.5 million riders daily—resumed service June 8, amid concerns from residents about exposing themselves to the closed, crowded conditions that could be ripe for coronavirus transmission. Researchers at Penn State aim to help minimize the risk of COVID-19 spread by identifying specific subway stations in which intervention resources—such as setting up testing sites, allocating additional personnel to disinfect frequently touched surfaces in subway stations, and distributing masks and hand sanitizer—could be of greatest benefit.”

Phys .org: Coronavirus lockdowns are pushing mass transit systems to the brink – and low-income riders will pay the price

Phys .org: Coronavirus lockdowns are pushing mass transit systems to the brink – and low-income riders will pay the price. “Steep declines in ridership during the crisis have pushed public transit systems across the U.S. into deep financial distress. Though Congress included allocations for transit in the CARES Act, cities said it won’t be nearly enough. Even major systems in large metro areas like New York City and Washington, D.C., have serious concerns about long-term survival without more sustained support. Failure of transit systems would be a disaster for the large proportion of low income households that depend on buses and trains to get to work and elsewhere—not only in urban areas, but in rural ones too.”