Stanford News: Stanford scans storied Judah railroad map

Stanford News: Stanford scans storied Judah railroad map. “Stanford Libraries has scanned an 1861 map depicting a proposed route for the railroad that eventually connected California with the rest of the country, making the one-of-a-kind map available for online viewing by people around the world. The Central Pacific Railroad Proposed Alignment Map, which is 66 feet long and 2.5 feet wide, comprises four maps on one continuous roll. “

Wired: LA’s Plan to Reboot Its Bus System—Using Cell Phone Data

Wired: LA’s Plan to Reboot Its Bus System—Using Cell Phone Data. “Transportation, meanwhile, emits nearly a third of the nation’s climate-change-causing greenhouse gases. Getting people out of cars and into buses and trains is key to knocking that number down. Trains are great, and Los Angeles’ light rail network—84 miles spreading across the Southland—is the largest in the country. But trains are expensive, and they can’t get everywhere. That’s where buses can come in. Yet at the precise moment when it’s most urgent that cities get people out of their cars, bus systems are struggling. So LA is talking about scrapping the system and starting over, the first radical revamp since rail came back to town. To figure out how to do it right, all the city’s transit planners need is location data from about 5 million cell phones.”

Curbed Chicago: Chicago first city to publish data on ride-hailing trips, drivers, and vehicles

Curbed Chicago: Chicago first city to publish data on ride-hailing trips, drivers, and vehicles. “Ride-hailing apps have changed the way cities work and now Chicago is allowing the public to take a closer look at those effects. The published datasets include information about Uber, Lyft and Via trips—even listing how much drivers were tipped.”

Lifehacker: Quickly Find a Nearby Scooter Using This App

Lifehacker: Quickly Find a Nearby Scooter Using This App. “I have admittedly been reluctant to embrace the scooters that are infiltrating our cities. In my neighborhood in San Francisco, you constantly have to be on the lookout to make sure an inexperienced rider isn’t going to mow you down on the sidewalk, and on weekends that sidewalk is also often literally blocked with piles of them. I hate them. But in my hometown in North Carolina, where there are considerably fewer of them, I see the appeal.”

Seattle Times: New tool helps you track all kinds of transit through the Seattle region, from buses and trains to ferries

Seattle Times: New tool helps you track all kinds of transit through the Seattle region, from buses and trains to ferries. “Have you ever run to a bus stop just in time for its scheduled arrival only to end up waiting for the bus to show up University of Washington junior Kona Farry has, so he built a website, unveiled late last month, that lets transit users track the whereabouts of all the buses, ferries, streetcars and light-rail trains in service in the Seattle region.”

Engadget: Open Curbs database could make it easier to catch an Uber

Engadget: Open Curbs database could make it easier to catch an Uber. “Curb data can be intensely useful to city planners and transportation companies alike, but it’s usually fenced off. What if everyone had access to it? They will now. Alphabet spinoff Coord has launched Open Curbs, a public repository for curb info like parking signs, fire hydrants and other vital details. The information could help cities identify safe places for delivery and ride hailing stops, not to mention aid in urban planning as the transportation grid evolves.”