BBC: How to heal the ‘mass trauma’ of Covid-19

BBC: How to heal the ‘mass trauma’ of Covid-19. “Trauma is a far subtler concept than many of us realise. It isn’t just a word for something extremely stressful. It doesn’t always come from short, sharp shocks like car accidents, terrorist attacks, or firefights. And, trauma isn’t the same thing as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). What trauma is about is events and their effect on the mind. But what separates it from something merely stressful is how we relate to these events on a deep level of belief. After the pandemic ends, the effects of the mass trauma it has inflicted will linger across societies for years. How might we understand this mental fallout? And what does the science of trauma suggest that we should – and shouldn’t – do in order to heal?”

KSLA: Psychologists see link between PTSD, violent social media posts

KSLA: Psychologists see link between PTSD, violent social media posts</a. "A study by Dr. Pam Ramsden, of the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Bradford, found that viewing violent new events such as [those] on social media can cause people to experience symptoms similar to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)." I was just thinking about this this morning, only I was thinking about the people on Mechanical Turk. Apparently some of those folks have to regularly look at horrifying, graphic images without any kind of help or support system.

Research Paper: Tweeting negative emotion: An investigation of Twitter data in the aftermath of violence on college campuses

Research paper, in PDF: Tweeting negative emotion: An investigation of Twitter data in the aftermath of violence on college campuses . “Studying communities impacted by traumatic events is often costly, requires swift action to enter the field when disaster strikes, and may be invasive for some traumatized respondents. Typically, individuals are studied after the traumatic event with no baseline data against which to compare their post-disaster responses. Given these challenges, we used longitudinal Twitter data across three case studies to examine the impact of violence near or on college campuses in the communities of Isla Vista, CA, Flagstaff, AZ, and Roseburg, OR, compared to control communities, between 2014 and 2015. “

Research: Twitter shows promise in rapid assessment of collective traumas’ local impact

Research: Twitter shows promise in rapid assessment of collective traumas’ local impact. “An alternative to using Twitter geotags and hashtags to identify community members who have experienced collective trauma, such as a school shooting, shows promise in helping researchers rapidly assess local effects. The approach, developed by researchers at the University of California, Irvine, was deployed to study the impact of deadly gun violence at UC Santa Barbara, Northern Arizona University and Oregon’s Umpqua Community College.”