The Guardian: Online cultural events can benefit lonely older people, study shows

The Guardian: Online cultural events can benefit lonely older people, study shows. “We remember it all too well from the first lockdown. The obligatory weekly Zoom quizzes and the stream of cultural events held online. While most of us can head down to the local pub again and delight in the return of good old Sunday quizzes, some people are still stuck at home. And research suggests online cultural activities such as museum tours can significantly improve the mental and physical health of elderly people who are homebound.”

The Guardian: From celebrity jets to Pelosi’s Taiwan trip, flight trackers are the sleeper hit of the summer

The Guardian: From celebrity jets to Pelosi’s Taiwan trip, flight trackers are the sleeper hit of the summer. “Want to watch a top-secret government flight live? Track a drug kingpin’s movements in real time? Or know how much Taylor Swift’s jets are polluting the air? They’re all streaming live on the sleeper hit of the summer: online flight trackers.”

News@Northeastern: The Future Of Historical Tourism Is On Your Phone

News@Northeastern: The Future Of Historical Tourism Is On Your Phone. “In Malden, Massachusetts, history always sits just beneath the surface–sometimes all it takes is a cell phone to uncover it. That’s the premise of ‘Chronosquad,’ a new augmented reality game that takes players on a guided historical tour through the streets of Malden, a small city north of Boston. It’s an unconventional way to expose the city’s 373 years of history, but one that cities and tourism companies are now using to attract tourists in the age of COVID-19.”

AccessWire: FestivalNet(R) Updates Largest Database of Festivals and Fairs in North America

AccessWire: FestivalNet(R) Updates Largest Database of Festivals and Fairs in North America (PRESS RELEASE). “From spring to winter, FestivalNet® covers 18,000 events around North America, each of which attracts hundreds or thousands of patrons, vendors, and visitors, creating opportunities in each host city, and a chance to experience new and exciting exhibits, games, food, and entertainment.”

Rest of World: Overrun by influencers, historic sites are banning TikTok creators in Nepal

Rest of World: Overrun by influencers, historic sites are banning TikTok creators in Nepal. “They come in hordes, strike funny poses, dance to loud music, trample over crops, and often stir up unmanageable crowds that cause traffic jams. TikTok creators in Nepal have earned a reputation for disrespecting religious and historic places in their quest to create viral videos, and are now facing a backlash.”

The Guardian: US tourist injured falling into Mount Vesuvius crater after taking selfie

The Guardian: US tourist injured falling into Mount Vesuvius crater after taking selfie. “The 23-year-old and his family reached the 1,281m-high (4,202ft) summit of the volcano towering over the southern Italian city of Naples after bypassing a visitor turnstile and proceeding along an out-of-bounds path. The man was taking a selfie, according to local press reports, when his phone slipped out of his hand and into the mouth of the volcano.”

The Music Network: That Festival Site to Launch New Era For Australian and New Zealand Music Festivals

The Music Network: That Festival Site to Launch New Era For Australian and New Zealand Music Festivals. “Officially launching this month, the new site is the creation of 21-year-old founder Jack Malloch, who wanted to develop a one-stop place for festival lovers to easily find information about both upcoming and past music festivals. Data has been gathered for more than 95 festivals, featuring a massive 900 lineups, 19,000 artists, and 30 years of music. Information on ticket prices, set times, and festival maps can be found, with key announcement dates also provided.”

WA Today: The Google Maps route that leads WA tourists into the forest

WA Today: The Google Maps route that leads WA tourists into the forest. “If you’re planning to visit the Valley of Giants treetop walk in Western Australia’s Great Southern region, your intention is likely to walk atop the forest, not end up in your humble sedan accidentally off-roading through it. But for the 140,000 people who travel to the tourist attraction each year, many are finding their satellite navigation is leading them astray.”

Travel+Leisure: Google Has a New Tool That Helps Travelers Find a Hotel Near a Landmark, Attraction, or Event

Travel+Leisure: Google Has a New Tool That Helps Travelers Find a Hotel Near a Landmark, Attraction, or Event. “Now, you can … quickly find places to stay within walking or driving distance of a particular landmark, attraction, or event, making it simple to find the right place to stay near a wedding venue, or any other event you’ve got going on, whether it’s a family reunion or a music festival. You can also use the tool to find a hotel near the top landmark on your travel list — which might mean searching for Paris hotels in walking distance of the Eiffel Tower.”

KOMO News: Ruby Princess cruise ship under investigation after multiple large COVID-19 outbreaks

KOMO News: Ruby Princess cruise ship under investigation after multiple large COVID-19 outbreaks. “The ship, the Ruby Princess, reported 37 cases for an April 23 trip. San Francisco Department of Public Health (SFDPH) officials say ships leaving the city must have a vaccine rate of 95 percent for crews and passengers to disembark. This trip had a 100 percent vaccine rate for the crew, passengers were at 99 percent, according to SFDPH. However, cases are still popping up. The 37 cases counted for the recent trip was more than tripled just 12 days before.”

Washington Post: Why is the U.S. still probing foreign visitors’ social media accounts?

Washington Post: Why is the U.S. still probing foreign visitors’ social media accounts?. “The government has never adequately explained, let alone provided evidence of, the need for this policy. Obama-era pilot programs failed to show that social media screening is a useful visa vetting tool. And during the early days of the Biden administration, the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, which analyzes the cost and benefits of regulations, rejected a previous DHS proposal to expand the State Department policy; it concluded that DHS had failed to demonstrate the policy’s ‘practical utility’ and to justify its ‘monetary and social’ costs. And yet the Biden administration is now doubling down on the Trump-era policy by expanding it.”