BuzzFeed News: The YouTube Channel Streaming Alex Jones’s Trial Disabled The Chat Because Of Threats To Sandy Hook Victims’ Families

BuzzFeed News: The YouTube Channel Streaming Alex Jones’s Trial Disabled The Chat Because Of Threats To Sandy Hook Victims’ Families. “The trial, which is being livestreamed in its entirety on YouTube by the Law & Crime channel, has had thousands of viewers each day since it began last week, although Jones himself has yet to testify. As always on Law & Crime’s streams, there are hundreds of active and colorful commenters, but trial viewers and Twitter users had noted from day one that the chat was littered with the same conspiracy theories that Jones now faces paying damages for.”

NPR: To try or not to try — remotely. As jury trials move online, courts see pros and cons

NPR: To try or not to try — remotely. As jury trials move online, courts see pros and cons. “NPR talked to nearly two dozen judges, attorneys and jurors who have participated in online jury trials to see how things are going. After nearly 18 months, some evidence is in but the verdict is still out. Some fears were realized, but there were unexpected benefits as well, including higher participation rate among people called to serve.”

Coronavirus: Woman who refused to wear mask in Costa Mesa grocery store goes on trial (Orange County Register)

Orange County Register: Coronavirus: Woman who refused to wear mask in Costa Mesa grocery store goes on trial. “A jury will soon decide whether Marianne Campbell Smith is guilty of a pair of misdemeanor charges, including trespassing and obstructing a business or customers, for allegedly refusing to leave busy Mother’s Market near the Triangle Square during an anti-mask protest on Aug. 15, 2020.”

Stanford University: Stanford scholars expand digital database with historic records from the Nuremberg Trial

Stanford University: Stanford scholars expand digital database with historic records from the Nuremberg Trial. “This additional collection, to be known as the Tad Taube Archive of the International Military Tribunal of Nuremberg, will allow the public to easily browse and discover the contents of over 5,000 trial records – including 250,000 pages of digitized paper documents – showing in meticulous detail the efforts of the IMT, a group of representatives from four Allied countries – the U.S., the U.K., the Soviet Union and France – who were tasked with prosecuting former officials of the Third Reich and holding them accountable for the horrific acts inflicted during World War II and the Holocaust.” The new collection launches tomorrow, October 1.

Mashable: Jurors could use VR to visit crime scenes, and help them reach a verdict

Mashable: Jurors could use VR to visit crime scenes, and help them reach a verdict. “In a paper published this May, researchers from the University of South Australia investigated whether the ability to inspect crime scenes in virtual reality could help jurors make decisions in courtroom trials. Measuring the impact of viewing the same crime scene in either VR or a photographic slideshow, they found that virtual reality led participants to a different, more consistent verdict than one based only on photos.”

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: For 75th Anniversary of Nuremberg Trials, Museum Makes Available War Crimes Trial Recordings, Film

From November. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: For 75th Anniversary of Nuremberg Trials, Museum Makes Available War Crimes Trial Recordings, Film. “The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has made available online the full sound recordings of the War Crimes Proceedings of the International Military Tribunal (IMT) established in Nuremberg, Germany, commonly referred to as the Nuremberg Trials. Additionally, the film evidence presented by the World War II Allied prosecutors at the trial is now available for online viewing. The collection consists of 1,942 gramophone discs holding 775 hours of hearings and 37 reels of film used as evidence in the trials.”

New York University: Research to Use Innovative Data Science Tools to Study Pretrial Detention in More than 1,000 U.S. Counties

New York University: Research to Use Innovative Data Science Tools to Study Pretrial Detention in More than 1,000 U.S. Counties. “A team of researchers from NYU’s Public Safety Lab will use data science techniques to study the impacts of pretrial detention in more than 1,000 U.S. counties—including many rural counties that have remained largely unstudied.”

New York Times – A Trial and a Twitterstorm: On Live-Tweeting From a Federal Courthouse

New York Times: A Trial and a Twitterstorm: On Live-Tweeting From a Federal Courthouse. “As I walked into a federal court in Dallas last Tuesday, waiting to hear the Facebook founder’s testimony, my pockets were filled with the items typical of a paranoid tech reporter on deadline: a laptop, my iPhone, spare batteries, charging cables, backup charging cables, a digital voice recorder, seven different ink pens and at least four of my favorite notebooks. I would broadcast his words to the world as quickly as I could, or watch my laptop die trying. Here is what I was not prepared for: A stern, six-foot tall retired United States Marshal, built like a brick house and with little time for pleasantries, telling me he’d kick me out of the courthouse if I sent one more tweet about the trial.”

New Initiatives Add to Transparency for China’s Judicial System

A number of initiatives are making China’s judicial system more transparent. “… on Sept. 27, Zhou Qiang, the chief justice of China’s Supreme People’s Court (SPC) and head of the country’s judiciary, announced the debut of an impressive new website, the Chinese Open Trial Network. It already boasts full, high-definition videos of over 67,000 criminal, administrative, and civil proceedings.” And there’s a lot more to come.

Google, Oracle Promise Not to Vet Potential Jurors’ Social Media

Google and Oracle have pinky-sworn not to investigate potential jurors’ social media in advance of their intellectual property trial. Disclaimer: they didn’t actually pinky swear. “The social media life and Internet activity of jurors can be a valuable resource for litigators, who routinely mine the world wide web for insights into the minds of the men and women they need to persuade. But two tech giants are swearing off the practice as they prepare to face off in a major copyright trial. At a time when Silicon Valley has cast itself as vigilant guardians of our data, Google and Oracle have agreed to extend to jurors an unusual amount of privacy protection.” This is probably less because they’ve suddenly become jury privacy advocates and more because the judge wanted them to fully disclose how they were doing social media vetting.

Judge: Oracle & Google Must Reveal How They’re Reviewing Potential Jurors’ Social Media

Google and Oracle are headed back to court, and a judge has ruled the two parties must reveal how they’re planning to vet the social media profiles of potential jurors. “After both sides requested extra time to review potential jurors’ answers to questionnaires, U.S. District Judge William Alsup said he realized the attorneys really wanted that time to scrub potential jurors’ social media accounts for personal data. ‘In this case there are good reasons to restrict, if not forbid, such searches by counsel, the jury consultants, investigators and clients,’ Alsup wrote in a March 25 ruling.”

New Database for Tokyo Trials of WWII

A database has been launched with information and transcripts from the “Tokyo Trials” following World War II. “The database currently contains documents amounting to 60 million words, 50 million of which are in English. It also contains 700 pictures and video records totaling 50 minutes, all featuring the trial and key figures involved.” Currently the site is in Chinese (I don’t know enough about Chinese writing systems to tell you if it’s written Cantonese or Mandarin, sorry), but Google Translate did a decent enough job for me to poke around. Plans are to translate it into other languages.