Boing Boing: Applying AI filters to an 1830 painting leads to pleasing results

Boing Boing: Applying AI filters to an 1830 painting leads to pleasing results. “Pyotr Basin (1793–1877) painted “The earthquake in Rocca di Papa, near Rome,” in 1830. According to Bruce Sterling, these images are the result of a ‘couple of guys screwing around attacking a 19th century Russian painting with deep-dreamers.’ I can’t find anything else about them but they’re fantastic.”

EurekAlert: These trippy images were designed by AI to super-stimulate monkey neurons

EurekAlert: These trippy images were designed by AI to super-stimulate monkey neurons. Sounds like Facebook. “To find out which sights specific neurons in monkeys ‘like’ best, researchers designed an algorithm, called XDREAM, that generated images that made neurons fire more than any natural images the researchers tested. As the images evolved, they started to look like distorted versions of real-world stimuli. The work appears May 2 in the journal Cell.”

Science Alert: Scientists Have Built a ‘Hallucination Machine’ For a Drug-Free Brain Trip

Science Alert: Scientists Have Built a ‘Hallucination Machine’ For a Drug-Free Brain Trip. “Using some deep Google AI trickery and a virtual reality headset, scientists have built a device they’re calling the Hallucination Machine – an experience a lot like tripping out, but without any of the actual drugs. This mind-bending immersive experience, several years in the making, has been put together to try and help experts understand exactly how the brain processes what we’re perceiving, and how that might differ between reality and hallucinations.”

Donald Trump, Deep Dream’d

If you like Donald Shakestrump, you’ll love this: a Donald Trump speech, Deep Dream’d by Google’s neural network. And if anyone wants to Deep Dream another candidate’s speeches or appearances – I suspect Bernie Sanders’ “bird on the podium” moment would be ideal – I’ll link to them too. Fair’s fair.

Twitter Bot Will Reimagine Your Picture in the Style of a Great Artist

Speaking of images: earlier this year I mentioned Google’s Deep Dream, which applied AI to images to make them, well, trippy. Now there’s a Twitter bot which will “dream” your photo in the style of a great artist. “Deep Forger is a Twitter account which will generate a version of any picture fed to it in the style of any other picture.” I sent it a picture of my feet and it’s in an 81-hour queue. Let’s see how it turns out. Original picture:

Google Gets Hologram Patent

Google has received a patent for displaying holograms in a head-mounted display. Like Google Glass. “Today Google was granted a patent for using holograms in a head mounted display like Google Glass. It would effectively let Google create augmented reality experiences that superimpose computer-generated imagery (CGI) atop the real world. Filed in March 2014, the patent shows Google’s research into how it could merge its head mounted display technology with AR.”

Twitter Bot Will Make Glitch Art Por Voo

Like Google’s Deep Dream, the AI that turns photos and videos into trippy, dogfaced art? Check out this Twitter bot for making glitch art. “After mentioning PixelSorter in a tweet with an uploaded image, it will then download the image, and begin segmenting an image into rows or columns according to their hue, brightness, luminance, etc. A few moments later, PixelSorter will @reply you with its own glitched-out version of the image you just uploaded.”

Deep-Dreaming Cartography

I’m sorry, I can’t stop thinking about Google’s Deep Dream toy — erm, I mean neural network tool. Yeah, that’s what I mean. Anyway, now researchers are deep-dreaming maps. “Last week, Google released the ”DeepDream” code to the public, so that anyone with some programming skills could process their own images with a psychedelic glaze. Naturally, a couple of brave mapmakers stepped in and produced some geo-visualizations—now, the hills literally have eyes.”

Gathering Up Those Trippy Deep Dreams

I have kind of nerd crush on Deep Dreaming, Google’s neural AI that generates psychedelic images. I find the images and videos mostly fascinating, occasionally disturbing. There’s just something about them that’s so otherworldly and yet, so… familiar. Right? (Or does nobody else feel that way and I have just admitted to being a huge weirdo?) Anyway, many efforts are underway to gather these images up and share them.