CNBC: Meta takes down Russian troll farm

CNBC: Meta takes down Russian troll farm. “Meta says that it’s continuing to crack down on bad actors across its social media sites. The company, which owns Facebook and Instagram, reported Thursday that it had taken down a Russia-based troll farm from Instagram earlier this year that had been churning out phony posts about the war in Ukraine.”

Cornell Chronicle: Russian trolls tried to distract voters with music tweets in 2016

Cornell Chronicle: Russian trolls tried to distract voters with music tweets in 2016. “In a finding that has implications for the 2022 midterm elections, Cornell researchers found Russia tried to distract liberal voters during the 2016 presidential campaign with a seemingly innocent weapon – tweets about music and videos – taking a page from its domestic disinformation playbook. The strategy resembles techniques used by autocratic governments that control their national media, such as Russia and China, which ‘flood’ social media with entertainment content to distract their citizens from domestic events like protests that they don’t want covered.”

Trollfare: How to Recognize and Fight Off Online Psyops (Defense One)

Defense One: Trollfare: How to Recognize and Fight Off Online Psyops. “EU President Ursula von der Leyen and others have correctly diagnosed Belarus’ use of migrants as part of a ‘hybrid attack’ against Europe’s democracies. But most have missed a key component of this and other such attacks: the psychological operations deployed online. The West must get better at detecting and countering them.”

Fast Company: This is where hateful trolls go after they are banned from mainstream social media

Fast Company: This is where hateful trolls go after they are banned from mainstream social media. “Ever wonder what happens to Twitter or Facebook users after they’re thrown out for hate speech? A team of researchers from Germany, the U.K., and the United States found out. Their research process was creative: They gathered 29 million posts from Gab, a right-wing platform known for its neo-Nazis, conspiracy theorists, and anti-Semitism, and then backtracked to find users’ other profiles on Twitter or Reddit, some of which had been suspended.”

Don’t Sue Me Like That: Anatomy of a Copyright Troll (Bloomberg)

Bloomberg: Don’t Sue Me Like That: Anatomy of a Copyright Troll. “Just as there are patent trolls who acquire intellectual property on the cheap and then attempt to extract payments from large companies, there are those who take advantage of laws designed to protect the works of artists and authors. Their targets, typically, are small publishers who might not appreciate their own vulnerability until they’re hit with a complaint.”

New York Times: How to Keep Internet Trolls Out of Remote Workplaces

New York Times: How to Keep Internet Trolls Out of Remote Workplaces. “Office conversation at some companies is starting to look as unruly as conversation on the internet. That’s because office conversation now is internet conversation. Many companies have been working online for nearly a year, with plans to continue well into 2021. And just as people are bolder behind keyboards on Twitter, they are bolder behind keyboards on workplace messaging platforms like Microsoft Teams and Slack — with all the good and all the bad, but with a lot more legal liability.”

Stanford Cyber Policy Center: Who Are the President of Guinea’s Facebook Trolls? The Blurry Line Between Modern Campaigning and Coordinated Inauthentic Behavior

Stanford Cyber Policy Center: Who Are the President of Guinea’s Facebook Trolls? The Blurry Line Between Modern Campaigning and Coordinated Inauthentic Behavior. “The West African country of Guinea will hold a crucial presidential election in October 2020 that will determine whether President Alpha Condé will extend his rule into a second decade, or whether Guinea will undergo its first-ever democratic transition of power. The election also has significant economic implications for Guinea’s international investors. In the runup to this election, we identified a network of 94 Facebook Pages that exhibited coordinated behavior in support of Condé and his party.”

Business Insider: A new algorithm could catch social-media trolls as they try to influence US elections. Researchers are offering it for free.

Business Insider: A new algorithm could catch social-media trolls as they try to influence US elections. Researchers are offering it for free.. “The tool, described in a study published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances, works by learning to recognize known, common patterns associated with troll activity and disinformation campaigns. Russian troll accounts, for instance, have posted many links to far-right websites, but the content on those sites didn’t always match the posts’ accompanying text or images. Venezuelan trolls, meanwhile, have often posted fake websites.”

Mashable: 4chan trolls reportedly behind part of the Iowa caucus chaos

Mashable: 4chan trolls reportedly behind part of the Iowa caucus chaos. “As the public still waits for the full results from Monday’s Iowa caucus, it at least now knows more about what contributed to the fallout. We already knew a few of the major factors: a historically chaotic process combined with a new yet broken app. Now, we know of another contributor to the mayhem: Trump-supporting 4chan trolls.”