Search Engine Journal: 7 Effective Tactics to Defeat Internet Trolls

Search Engine Journal: 7 Effective Tactics to Defeat Internet Trolls . “To this day, trolls emerge from the dank recesses of their troll caves to stir up trouble in discussions, on social media, and anywhere they can make people mad. For the rest of us, there are ways to fight back and maintain civility, friendly discourse, and fun in our online communities – not in spite of the trolls, but in direct opposition to everything they stand for.”

TechCrunch: This game uses troll tactics to teach critical thinking

TechCrunch: This game uses troll tactics to teach critical thinking. “The best medicine against online disinformation is an informed society that’s thinking critically. The problem is there are no shortcuts to universal education. Enter Finnish Public Broadcasting Company, Yle, which is hoping to harness the engagement power of gamification to accelerate awareness and understanding of troll tactics and help more people spot malicious Internet fakes. It’s put together an online game, called Troll Factory, that lets you play at being, well, a hateful troll. Literally.” The article notes that the game contains offensive and extremist content — because, well, it’s about trolling.

Washington Post: Why crafty Internet trolls in the Philippines may be coming to a website near you

Washington Post: Why crafty Internet trolls in the Philippines may be coming to a website near you. “The world of Internet trolls — the gaslighting, the fabrications, the nastiness — is now a fact of life in the Web ecosystem nearly everywhere. But something new is happening here: Experienced public relations experts in the Philippines are harnessing the raw energy of young and aggressive social media shape-shifters.”

The Verge: Twitch is closing in on its Christchurch trolls

The Verge: Twitch is closing in on its Christchurch trolls. “For just over a month, Twitch has been trying to track down a group of anonymous trolls who spammed the platform with violent footage of the Christchurch shooting in the wake of the attack. That hunt kicked off in earnest when Twitch filed suit against the trolls earlier in June, but new filings show the company has more clues to the perpetrators’ identity than anyone suspected, including specific email addresses for at least three people and Discord logs where the attack was organized.”

France24: China’s social media troll ‘army’ wages war on Uighurs

France24: China’s social media troll ‘army’ wages war on Uighurs. “The Chinese troll army suddenly struck one evening, bombarding the Facebook pages of two pro-Uighur groups with an array of verbal grenades and offensive images. The social media onslaught was the handiwork of the self-styled Diba Central Army, a Chinese patriotic group that has targeted other pages in the past to defend Beijing.”

University of Iowa: Measurement and Early Detection of Third-Party Application Abuse on Twitter

University of Iowa: Measurement and Early Detection of Third-Party Application Abuse on Twitter. This is a PDF. “Third-party applications present a convenient way for attackers to orchestrate a large number of fake and compromised accounts on popular online social networks. Despite recent high-profile reports of third-party application abuse on Twitter, Facebook, and Google, prior work lacks automated approaches for accurate and early detection of abusive applications. In this paper, we perform a longitudinal study of abusive third-party applications on Twitter that perform a variety of malicious and spam activities in violation of Twitter’s terms of service. Our measurements over a period of 16 months demonstrate an ongoing arms race between attackers continuously registering and abusing new applications and Twitter trying to detect them. We find that hundreds of thousands of abusive applications remain undetected by Twitter for several months while posting tens of millions of tweets. To this end, we propose a machine learning approach for accurate and early detection of abusive Twitter applications by analyzing their first few tweets.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: When Online Trolls Show Up in Class, Should Professors Be Able to Ban Them?

Chronicle of Higher Education: When Online Trolls Show Up in Class, Should Professors Be Able to Ban Them?. “Public scholars are well acquainted with online hatred. But professors at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are debating what to do when the vitriol ceases to be just virtual and takes a seat in the front row of the classroom.”