Sunlight Foundation: Three attacks on public information highlighted in Gov404, our new Web censorship tracker

Sunlight Foundation: Three attacks on public information highlighted in Gov404, our new Web censorship tracker. “Today the Web Integrity Project (WIP) released Gov404: The Web Integrity Project’s Censorship Tracker. Gov404 is a new tool tracking removals of online resources and reductions in access to content on federal websites, uncovered through our work and the work of others. We hope Gov404 will be a useful resource for researchers and journalists exploring how the federal Web is being altered, sometimes in response to policy shifts, and sometimes not. We’ve highlighted some of the most important trends we’ve found in our Gov404 release post.”

Engadget: Trump administration may monitor social media to catch disability fraud (updated)

Engadget: Trump administration may monitor social media to catch disability fraud (updated). “If you’re claiming disability benefits, a latergram of you hiking or going out dancing could soon get you in trouble. A proposed Trump administration rule would allow agency officials to snoop on the social media accounts of Social Security disability recipients. The White House is working with the Social Security Administration to propose a new rule that allow for social media monitoring in order to crack down on fraud, reports the New York Times.”

State of the Union 2019: Live on YouTube (Google Blog)

Google Blog: State of the Union 2019: Live on YouTube. “As we have done since 2010, YouTube will live stream the President’s State of the Union address on Tuesday, February 5 at 9 p.m. ET, as well as the response. This year, you can tune in to live streams in both English and Spanish.”

Gizmodo: Fake FCC Comments Linked to Ex-Trump Campaign Director’s Org, Boosted By Roger Stone

Gizmodo: Fake FCC Comments Linked to Ex-Trump Campaign Director’s Org, Boosted By Roger Stone . “An organization run by a former Trump campaign statewide director is being investigated by the New York attorney general’s office for its role in the submission of potentially hundreds of thousands of fraudulent comments to the Federal Communications Commission during the agency’s 2017 efforts to rollback Obama-era net neutrality rules.”

Gizmodo: ACLU is Suing the Federal Government for Information About Social Media Surveillance Practices

Gizmodo: ACLU Is Suing the Federal Government for Information About Social Media Surveillance Practices. “The American Civil Liberties Union Foundation filed a lawsuit in the Northern District of California against the federal government on Thursday over its social media surveillance practices, specifically relating to the Trump administration’s controversial immigration policy known as ‘extreme vetting.'”

TechCrunch: Transparency-seeking OPEN Government Data Act signed into law

TechCrunch: Transparency-seeking OPEN Government Data Act signed into law . “The federal government produces one hell of a lot of data, but despite desultory lurches toward usability, there’s little guarantee that it’s available in a way that makes it useful to anyone. That may change for the better with the OPEN Government Data Act, which the president signed into law last night. The act essentially requires federal agencies to default when possible to making data (and metadata) public, to publish that public data in a machine-readable format and catalog it online. It also mandates that chief data officers be appointed at those agencies to handle the process.”

New York Times Magazine: All the President’s Memes

New York Times Magazine: All the President’s Memes. “It’s impossible to overstate how peculiar it is that the most powerful man in the world, who will turn 73 in June, posts memes. It’s a behavior more often associated with youth, irreverence and a surfeit of free time — though certainly plenty of old, aggrieved people have picked up the habit in recent years. In 2016, the Trump campaign united message-board trolls and Facebook boomers, and together they disseminated so many memes that some of them began to believe — both jokingly and not — that their ‘meme magic’ had helped Trump win the election.”