CNET: Alexa and Google Assistant are developing personalities

CNET: Alexa and Google Assistant are developing personalities. “Google Assistant may be the most naturalistic voice assistant yet, but neither it nor Alexa and Siri are close to achieving the sentience you see in movies like Her. They won’t be your friend, your significant other or (if 2001: A Space Odyssey is more your bag) your mortal enemy. But your relationships with them could have further reaching consequences than you think.”

Phys .org: You’re probably more susceptible to misinformation than you think

Phys. org: You’re probably more susceptible to misinformation than you think. “Ask people directly and most will tell you they don’t trust the news they see on social media. And a landmark study in 2019 found 43% of social media users admitted to sharing inaccurate content themselves. So people are certainly aware in principle that misinformation is common online. But ask people where they learned about the ‘facts’ that support their political opinions, and the answer will often be social media.”

Phys .org: By leap of faith? How to regain trust in science and expertise

Phys .org: By leap of faith? How to regain trust in science and expertise. “Fake news? Post-truth? Populism? In the current environment of growing scepticism about political institutions and a dismissal of journalism and scientific facts, public trust in expertise is seen as eroding. Such trends are often associated with a changing digital communication landscape where new responses and mechanisms are required to find common ground in public discourse and decision-making.”

MIT Technology Review: Most Americans think they’re being constantly tracked—and that there’s nothing they can do

MIT Technology Review: Most Americans think they’re being constantly tracked—and that there’s nothing they can do. “It’s not just that Americans (correctly) think companies are collecting their data. They don’t like it. About 69% of Americans are skeptical that companies will use their private information in a way they’re comfortable with, while 79% don’t believe that companies will come clean if they misuse the information.”

Phys .org: Cynical social media voices can erode trust in news media

Phys .org: Cynical social media voices can erode trust in news media. “Amid rising concerns about low public trust in mainstream media institutions, a Rutgers study found that real-life and online social interactions can strongly influence a person’s trust in newspaper, TV and online journalism—but when it comes to online interactions, cynical views are the most influential.”

Ozy: Distrusting The Press, Arab Youth Turn To Social Media

Ozy: Distrusting The Press, Arab Youth Turn To Social Media. “Ahmad couldn’t believe his eyes when he saw the headline. It was December 2017 and Mada Masr — Egypt’s last independent outlet — published an investigation detailing how a front for the Egyptian intelligence agency bought seven of the country’s most prominent media outlets. ‘I knew never to trust mainstream Egyptian media again,’ says Ahmad, a 23-year-old activist who asked not to disclose his last name for fear of reprisal. ‘From then on, Facebook became the only place where I could get my breaking news, but I also check Mada Masr.'”

Ottawa Citizen: Social media skepticism helping fuel distrust of the internet, survey finds

Ottawa Citizen: Social media skepticism helping fuel distrust of the internet, survey finds. “A new global survey suggests distrust of the internet is being fuelled by growing skepticism of social-media services like Facebook and Twitter. One in four people who took part in the survey said they didn’t trust the internet, a view increasingly being driven by lack of confidence in social media, governments and search engines.”

The Instagram of Trust: How to Redesign the Architecture of Trust in Products (Hacker Noon)

Hacker Noon: The Instagram of Trust: How to Redesign the Architecture of Trust in Products. “More technology requires us to give up our privacy for the cost of better personalization. But how to fix the issue of ever growing lack of trust in our society? More and more brands are asking people for trust based on their promises and by being transparent about its policies. But the psychology of trust works quite differently. There have been many attempts and debates happening around the black box of algorithms and being transparent about how the algorithms work. But I would like to ask: Is transparency enough? Is it an effective way to build a long-lasting relationship with a customer? Is it going to build trust in a brand and in a product?”

Phys .org: People more likely to trust machines than humans with their private information

Phys .org: People more likely to trust machines than humans with their private information. “Not everyone fears our machine overlords. In fact, according to Penn State researchers, when it comes to private information and access to financial data, people tend to trust machines more than people, which could lead to both positive and negative online behaviors.”

Study: Fake news is making college students question all news (Poynter)

Poynter: Study: Fake news is making college students question all news. “It’s tough out there for college students these days — especially on their news feeds. According to a new media consumption study, almost half of the nearly 6,000 American college students surveyed said they lacked confidence in discerning real from fake news on social media. And 36 percent of them said the threat of misinformation made them trust all media less.”

PR Newswire: New Survey Details the State of Online Privacy and Social Media in America Amidst GDPR (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: New Survey Details the State of Online Privacy and Social Media in America Amidst GDPR (PRESS RELEASE). “A new survey conducted by Washington-based digital agency Rad Campaign and analytics firm Lincoln Park Strategies has found 3 out of 5 Americans distrust social media when it comes to protecting their privacy online. Despite increased use of social media platforms Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Snapchat and use of smart speakers like Amazon Echo and Google Home, most Americans have little or no trust that these platforms, or current laws, will protect them.”

Pew: Our expanded focus on trust, facts and the state of democracy

Pew (pew pew pew pew pew!): Our expanded focus on trust, facts and the state of democracy. “Today, we are issuing a comprehensive look at public attitudes on the state of American democracy. In the months ahead, we will examine how Americans balance the desire to address false news and First Amendment freedoms, explore how news consumers differentiate between fact and opinion in news content, and add to our existing research on how trust functions in democracies. We also plan to take a close look at public confidence in the electoral process. And in an upcoming 30-nation study, we will bring a global perspective to these issues.”

KTUU: Report finds confidence in social media platforms at a crisis point

KTUU: Report finds confidence in social media platforms at a crisis point. “With controversy swirling around social media companies, an Internet safety group says users’ trust in them has sunk to an all-time low. Getting back in good standing for these companies that are now ever-present in our society could come at a dial-up pace. Tom Galvin’s company Digital Citizens Alliance conducted a report that finds 71 percent of respondents lost trust in Facebook. They say 51 percent find it to be an irresponsible company.”

AASLH: Most Trust Museums as Sources of Historical Information

AASLH: Most Trust Museums as Sources of Historical Information. “In an AASLH 2018 broader population sampling, conducted by Wilkening Consulting, we asked 1,000 people about the trustworthiness of four history sources, and a generic ‘museums.’ We found that 81% of respondents ranked history museums and historic sites as ‘absolutely’ or ‘somewhat’ trustworthy—making them more trustworthy than history textbooks and nonfiction, high school history teachers, and the internet as sources of history information.” AASLH stands for American Association for State and Local History.

Fake news fallout: Cascading collapse in trust for social media platforms, search and governements (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Fake news fallout: Cascading collapse in trust for social media platforms, search and governements. “Facebook, Google and Twitter’s failure to deal with the damaging effects of fake news has created a broad distrust in social media platforms, search engines and news applications reports the Edelman Trust Barometer 2018 — a survey of more than 33,000 people in 28 countries. But trust in journalism has improved greatly and there is now a wide divide between peoples’ low regard for media platforms and their much improved respect for journalists and journalism.” The misspelling is in the headline as it is. I tend not to correct misspellings unless not doing so leaves the sentence incomprehensible.