PR Newswire: New Survey Details the State of Online Privacy and Social Media in America Amidst GDPR (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: New Survey Details the State of Online Privacy and Social Media in America Amidst GDPR (PRESS RELEASE). “A new survey conducted by Washington-based digital agency Rad Campaign and analytics firm Lincoln Park Strategies has found 3 out of 5 Americans distrust social media when it comes to protecting their privacy online. Despite increased use of social media platforms Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Snapchat and use of smart speakers like Amazon Echo and Google Home, most Americans have little or no trust that these platforms, or current laws, will protect them.”

Pew: Our expanded focus on trust, facts and the state of democracy

Pew (pew pew pew pew pew!): Our expanded focus on trust, facts and the state of democracy. “Today, we are issuing a comprehensive look at public attitudes on the state of American democracy. In the months ahead, we will examine how Americans balance the desire to address false news and First Amendment freedoms, explore how news consumers differentiate between fact and opinion in news content, and add to our existing research on how trust functions in democracies. We also plan to take a close look at public confidence in the electoral process. And in an upcoming 30-nation study, we will bring a global perspective to these issues.”

KTUU: Report finds confidence in social media platforms at a crisis point

KTUU: Report finds confidence in social media platforms at a crisis point. “With controversy swirling around social media companies, an Internet safety group says users’ trust in them has sunk to an all-time low. Getting back in good standing for these companies that are now ever-present in our society could come at a dial-up pace. Tom Galvin’s company Digital Citizens Alliance conducted a report that finds 71 percent of respondents lost trust in Facebook. They say 51 percent find it to be an irresponsible company.”

AASLH: Most Trust Museums as Sources of Historical Information

AASLH: Most Trust Museums as Sources of Historical Information. “In an AASLH 2018 broader population sampling, conducted by Wilkening Consulting, we asked 1,000 people about the trustworthiness of four history sources, and a generic ‘museums.’ We found that 81% of respondents ranked history museums and historic sites as ‘absolutely’ or ‘somewhat’ trustworthy—making them more trustworthy than history textbooks and nonfiction, high school history teachers, and the internet as sources of history information.” AASLH stands for American Association for State and Local History.

Fake news fallout: Cascading collapse in trust for social media platforms, search and governements (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Fake news fallout: Cascading collapse in trust for social media platforms, search and governements. “Facebook, Google and Twitter’s failure to deal with the damaging effects of fake news has created a broad distrust in social media platforms, search engines and news applications reports the Edelman Trust Barometer 2018 — a survey of more than 33,000 people in 28 countries. But trust in journalism has improved greatly and there is now a wide divide between peoples’ low regard for media platforms and their much improved respect for journalists and journalism.” The misspelling is in the headline as it is. I tend not to correct misspellings unless not doing so leaves the sentence incomprehensible.

The Guardian: Just one in four Britons trust news on social media, finds survey

The Guardian: Just one in four Britons trust news on social media, finds survey. “Only 24% of the UK population trust the likes of Twitter, Facebook and Instagram when looking for news and information, a survey has found. The Edelman trust barometer, published on Monday, suggests the days when social media was championed as an enabler of citizen journalists and for its role in the Arab Spring have passed.”

Pew: The Fate of Online Trust in the Next Decade

Pew (pew pew pew pew pew!): The Fate of Online Trust in the Next Decade. “Many experts say lack of trust will not be a barrier to increased public reliance on the internet. Those who are hopeful that trust will grow expect technical and regulatory change will combat users’ concerns about security and privacy. Those who have doubts about progress say people are inured to risk, addicted to convenience and will not be offered alternatives to online interaction. Some expect the very nature of trust will change.”