Phys .org: The truth about misinformation

Phys .org: The truth about misinformation. “In today’s fast-paced digital age, information can become outdated rapidly and people must constantly update their memories. But changing our previous understanding of the news we hear or the products we use isn’t always easy, even when holding onto falsities can have serious consequences.”

Arizona State University: New grants advance focus on truth in public life

Arizona State University: New grants advance focus on truth in public life. “Americans today are being assailed by the rise of ‘fake news’ and a growing combativeness around democratic principles, including freedom of the press and religion, that have long been considered settled. From basic facts to fundamental democratic values, a lot seems up for grabs. To understand and challenge these trends, faculty affiliated with Arizona State University’s Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict have received two grants for projects that will put ASU at the forefront of new conversations about truth in the public sphere — how we know it, recognize it and identify it.”

Phys .org: No lie! FSU researcher developing world’s first online polygraph

Phys .org: No lie! FSU researcher developing world’s first online polygraph. “It’s tricky enough in face-to-face conversations that offer facial expressions, gestures and tone of voice because those physical cues add context. Spotting a liar gets even tougher in blind computer conversations. Florida State University researcher Shuyuan Ho wants to shed those blinders by creating a revolutionary online polygraph.”

McClatchy DC: Fake, misleading social media posts exploding globally, Oxford study finds

McClatchy DC: Fake, misleading social media posts exploding globally, Oxford study finds. “Russia’s social media blitz to influence the 2016 U.S. election was part of a global ‘phenomenon’ in which a broad spectrum of governments and political parties used Internet platforms to spread junk news and disinformation in at least 48 countries last year, an Oxford University study has found.”

Slate: Lies Travel Faster Than Truth on Twitter—and Now We Know Who to Blame

Slate: Lies Travel Faster Than Truth on Twitter—and Now We Know Who to Blame. “A major new study published in the journal Science finds that false rumors on Twitter spread much more rapidly, on average, than those that turn out to be true. Interestingly, the study also finds that bots aren’t to blame for that discrepancy. People are.” Us Terry Pratchett fans knew this already: “A lie can run around the world before the truth can get its boots on.” (Actually the article specifically addresses this kind of perspective but I will always quote Terry Pratchett if given the opportunity.)

Associated Press: Efforts grow to help students evaluate what they see online

Associated Press: Efforts grow to help students evaluate what they see online. “Alarmed by the proliferation of false content online, state lawmakers around the country are pushing schools to put more emphasis on teaching students how to tell fact from fiction. Lawmakers in several states have introduced or passed bills calling on public school systems to do more to teach media literacy skills that they say are critical to democracy. The effort has been bipartisan but has received little attention despite successful legislation in Washington state, Connecticut, Rhode Island and New Mexico. Several more states are expected to consider such bills in the coming year, including Arizona, New York and Hawaii.”

Pursuit: How to Find the Truth on Twitter

Pursuit: How to Find the Truth on Twitter. “Social media is becoming many people’s main source of information, so finding a way to assess what is genuine and what is fake is increasingly important. We have developed a framework, published in PLOS One, that assesses whether an event reported in a tweet is likely to be a witness account or not, by assessing the evidence of whether the tweeter is on-the-ground at the event.”