University of Alaska Fairbanks: New tsunami map tool empowers Alaskans to plan for the worst

University of Alaska Fairbanks: New tsunami map tool empowers Alaskans to plan for the worst. “The Alaska Earthquake Center’s new Alaska Tsunami Hazard Map Tool will help people plan for the worst. The tool, which went live this month, is an online map portal that displays potential tsunami hazard zones for settlements across Alaska.”

Nature: Mystery of deadly Indonesian tsunami cracked using social-media videos

Nature: Mystery of deadly Indonesian tsunami cracked using social-media videos. “A super-fast tsunami that ravaged an Indonesian island last year, killing thousands, was almost certainly triggered by underwater landslides, according to a detailed reconstruction of the disaster using surveillance-camera and video footage harvested from amateur posts on YouTube and other social media.”

France24: Indonesia battles fake news after quake-tsunami disaster

France24: Indonesia battles fake news after quake-tsunami disaster. ” Indonesia has cracked down on ‘fake news’ about its deadly quake-tsunami disaster, with police arresting nine people for spreading hoaxes in a bid to prevent further panic spreading among survivors. False reports claiming that another huge quake was about to hit Sulawesi island — which is already reeling from last Friday’s double tragedy that has killed over 1,400 people — have circulated online in recent days.”

Informed Infrastructure: Tsunami Ravaged City’s Architecture Preserved in Digital Archive

Informed Infrastructure: Tsunami Ravaged City’s Architecture Preserved in Digital Archive. “AN emerging architectural research method is being used to document the architectural heritage of Indonesian buildings wiped out in the 2004 tsunami. Banda Aceh, on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, was one of the worst affected areas in the December 26 tsunami, which killed more than 200,000 people in 11 countries.”

Anthropology News: Disasters Digitized

Anthropology News: Disasters Digitized. “Although much has been said about the triple disaster—earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdowns—in Japan in March 2011 (hereafter, 3.11), the upsurge of digital records and efforts to archive them in and outside of Japan after these events have been less discussed. These archives are populated not only with born-digital artifacts (e.g., photographs, audio files, video footage, websites and blogs) but also digitalized artifacts (e.g., bureaucratic documents, pamphlets circulated in temporary shelters, 3D renditions of tsunami-damaged buildings). As of June 2017, more than six years after 3.11, there are over 60 digital archive projects, hosted by the local and national governments, private and non-profit sectors, and academic institutions, all with the goal to preserve and transmit digital(ized) traces of the past.”

Scoop: New database sheds light on prehistoric NZ tsunamis

Scoop: New database sheds light on prehistoric NZ tsunamis. “The scientific records of palaeotsunamis to have affected New Zealand shores can now be accessed in a new one-stop information shop. A palaeotsunami is a tsunami that occurred before written records existed and has been discovered by investigating geological and anthropological evidence.”