Voice of America: Tunisia Cracks Down on Social Media 10 Years After Arab Spring

Voice of America: Tunisia Cracks Down on Social Media 10 Years After Arab Spring. “Tunisian police are arresting social media activists for criticizing the government online and calling for protests, according to rights groups. Ten years after Tunisia’s Arab Spring uprising for democracy, the country has been hit by a wave of riots and protests over ongoing political unrest and a poor economy.”

BBC: Tunisia youths warned over riots amid Covid curfew

BBC: Tunisia youths warned over riots amid Covid curfew. “Protesters who broke a coronavirus curfew to continue riots for a fifth night have been warned by Tunisia’s prime minister to stop their violence. More than 600 people, mainly between the ages of 14 and 15, have already been arrested after police clashes. Prime Minister Hichem Mechichi acknowledged their anger about a range of economic and social hardships.”

Operation Carthage: How a Tunisian company conducted influence operations in African presidential elections (Atlantic Council)

Atlantic Council: Operation Carthage: How a Tunisian company conducted influence operations in African presidential elections. “A Tunisia-based company operated a sophisticated digital campaign involving multiple social media platforms and websites in an attempt to influence the country’s 2019 presidential election, as well as other recent elections in Africa. In an exclusive investigation that began in September 2019, the DFRLab uncovered dozens of online assets with connections to Tunisian digital communications firm UReputation.”

CNET: Don’t defy coronavirus lockdown rules, or this robot will call you on it

CNET: Don’t defy coronavirus lockdown rules, or this robot will call you on it. “The PGuard robots from Tunisia-based Enova Robotics come equipped with infrared and thermal-imaging cameras and a sound and light alarm system for making public announcements. If the bots spot potential violators, they roll up and ask to see IDs to be examined remotely by police officers, who can communicate with citizens in real time via microphones and speakers.”