Rest of World: “Hostage-taking laws” seem to be fueling a Twitter crackdown in India

Rest of World: “Hostage-taking laws” seem to be fueling a Twitter crackdown in India. “Increasingly popular around the world, ‘hostage-taking laws,’ are government mandates that require social media companies to have physical offices and employees in the countries where they operate. In addition to India, these laws have been put in place in Nigeria, Turkey, and Vietnam. Observers say that Twitter’s recent takedowns in India highlight how governments leverage these laws and create a regulatory environment with higher-stakes penalties, which makes it easier to demand companies to censor the speech of journalists and dissidents.”

Daily Sabah: New database offers insight into 802 historical seals

Daily Sabah: New database offers insight into 802 historical seals. “Carrying out works on various elements of manuscripts, the Presidency of Turkey Manuscripts Institution (TYEKB) has prepared a new database on seals for researchers and history enthusiasts. With the seal database, TYEKB aims to present the data of all seals that the manuscripts and printed works in its collections feature with their images and detailed evaluations. The platform also intends to analyze data on seals and publish research articles prepared by experts on the subject.”

Daily Sabah: 40 arrested in Twitch corruption probe in Turkey

Daily Sabah: 40 arrested in Twitch corruption probe in Turkey. “Demirören News Agency (DHA) reported that some suspects had collaborated with streamers who were aware that the bit payments were made using stolen credit cards and took their share. Bits cannot be converted to actual money but the scammers are accused of getting payment in actual money from streamers in exchange of huge troves of bits they sent. The scheme was allegedly used for money laundering by criminal groups.”

Daily Sabah: ‘All social media providers have opened rep offices in Turkey’

Daily Sabah: ‘All social media providers have opened rep offices in Turkey’. “All social media providers, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Youtube and Amazon, have opened representative offices in Turkey, Chair of the Parliamentary Digital Media Commission and the ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party) Deputy Hüseyin Yayman said Monday, marking a year since the country introduced new social media regulations.”

Xinhua: Turkish nurses detained for issuing fake COVID-19 vaccine cards

Xinhua: Turkish nurses detained for issuing fake COVID-19 vaccine cards. “Turkish police detained three nurses on Tuesday for allegedly providing fake COVID-19 vaccine cards to unvaccinated people, local media reported. Acting on a tip-off, police teams apprehended the nurses who work at a private hospital in Bahcelievler district on the European side of Istanbul, said Turkey’s English newspaper Daily Sabah.”

Al-Monitor: Turkey’s plans for new social media restrictions threaten five years in prison for spreading fake news

Al-Monitor: Turkey’s plans for new social media restrictions threaten five years in prison for spreading fake news . “Proposals due to be put before parliament when it returns in October include punishment of one to five years for disseminating fake news, while those convicted of online insults would face up to two years in jail, the pro-government Turkiye newspaper reported.”

Hurriyet Daily News: Prosecutor launches probe into ‘Help Turkey’ social media posts

Hurriyet Daily News: Prosecutor launches probe into ‘Help Turkey’ social media posts. “The Ankara Chief Public Prosecutor’s Office has launched a probe into social media posts that asked for foreign help with the hashtag ‘Help Turkey’ amid the massive wildfires. In a statement on Aug. 5, the prosecutor’s office argued that the posts were trying to show the country as ‘incapable’ and ‘attempted to create panic, fear and concern among the public.’”

New York Times: Why Turkey’s Regulators Became Such a Problem for Google

New York Times: Why Turkey’s Regulators Became Such a Problem for Google. “The tension between Turkey and Google reflects how growing animosity toward Silicon Valley giants is popping up even in places, like Turkey, with little history of antitrust enforcement against the industry. The efforts threaten to upend conditions — an open global internet and light-touch government regulation — that have helped fuel the growth of those companies in the past two decades. In their place could be a checkerboard of laws and regulations, where the available products and services depend on where a person logs on.”

Stockholm Center for Freedom: Hate speech against refugees increases on Turkish social media as a new wave of Afghan migrants arrives

Stockholm Center for Freedom: Hate speech against refugees increases on Turkish social media as a new wave of Afghan migrants arrives. “Hate speech against refugees on Turkish social media has increased recently, with a new wave of refugee arrivals in Turkey starting as the Taliban increases the territory it controls in Afghanistan amid a US troop withdrawal.”