Poynter: Sarah Sanders didn’t tweet this COVID-19 conspiracy theory

Poynter: Sarah Sanders didn’t tweet this COVID-19 conspiracy theory. “The tweet was like a word cloud of popular conspiracy theory topics: COVID-19, Russia, antifa and Hillary Clinton. And it looked like it came from former White House press secretary Sarah Sanders. Sanders has a couple verified Twitter accounts: @SHSanders45, where she last tweeted in 2019, @SarahHuckabee, where she actively tweets today. And she once tweeted from the handle @PressSec. But an image being shared on Facebook that looks like she tweeted a conspiracy theory from yet another account is not actually from Sanders.”

Ohio State News: Twitter posts reveal polarization in Congress on COVID-19

Ohio State News: Twitter posts reveal polarization in Congress on COVID-19. “The rapid politicization of the COVID-19 pandemic can be seen in messages members of the U.S. Congress sent about the issue on the social media site Twitter, a new analysis found. Using artificial intelligence and resources from the Ohio Supercomputer Center, researchers conducted an analysis that covered all 30,887 tweets that members sent about COVID-19 from the first one on Jan. 17 through March 31. The algorithm they created could correctly classify the political party of the member who sent each tweet 76 percent of the time, based only on the text of the tweet and the date it was sent.”

CNN: Twitter puts warning on Trump tweet for ‘threat of harm’ against DC protesters

CNN: Twitter puts warning on Trump tweet for ‘threat of harm’ against DC protesters. “Twitter on Tuesday put a warning label on a tweet from President Donald Trump in which he warned if protesters tried to set up an ‘autonomous zone’ in Washington DC they would be ‘met with serious force!'”

The Verge: Twitter’s new reply-limiting feature is already changing how we talk on the platform

The Verge: Twitter’s new reply-limiting feature is already changing how we talk on the platform. “Previously, anybody could reply to anybody on Twitter (as long as their profile wasn’t private or blocked). But now, if you’re part of the test, you can decide if you want to allow replies from everyone, only people you follow, or only people you tag — which, if you don’t tag anyone, means that no one can reply at all. Deciding who can reply to which tweet on a tweet-by-tweet basis could change how some people use the social media platform in significant ways.”

TechCrunch: Twitter tests a feature that calls you out for RTing without reading the article

TechCrunch: Twitter tests a feature that calls you out for RTing without reading the article. “A new Twitter test feature aiming to ‘promote informed discussion’ will nudge users to read before they retweet. The company describes the test as a step to help people be more aware of what they’re sharing in a broader effort to inspire ‘healthier conversations’ on the platform.”

CNET: Employee who protested Facebook’s stance on Trump posts fired over tweet

CNET: Employee who protested Facebook’s stance on Trump posts fired over tweet. “Facebook fired an employee who protested the social network’s hands-off approach to President Donald Trump’s controversial posts after he publicly called out another employee’s ‘inaction’ in a tweet.”

UNLV Capstone Project: How Misinformation Spreads Through Twitter

UNLV Capstone Project: How Misinformation Spreads Through Twitter. “As new technologies emerge, a major piece of both content creation and the perpetuation of misinformation are social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube. As news events emerge, whether be a pandemic, a mass shooting, or an election campaign, it is difficult to divulge the facts from fiction when so many different ‘facts’ appear. This study looks at 14,545,945 tweets generated in the wake of the 1 October mass shooting and its second anniversary to identify how much of the public response is fogged by information pollution, to identify what kind of misinformation is spread and how it spreads on Twitter and news coverage.”

University of Miami: Experts explore Twitter and its role in public conversations

University of Miami: Experts explore Twitter and its role in public conversations. “When Twitter founder Jack Dorsey launched the online social networking site in March 2006, his team envisioned a noble purpose for the enterprise: to serve the public conversation and stimulate shared learning and solutions for some of the world’s most complex problems. Yet today, far from being a hub for healthy exchange, Twitter seems to function more often as a lightning rod for vitriol and reflecting the schisms in society. Twitter and other social media platforms and their executives have come under increasing criticism from both sides of the political spectrum: from progressives who clamor for the platforms to restrict the harassment, hate speech, and misinformation that proliferates, and from conservatives, including President Donald Trump, who claim a bias against conservative ideas.”

Boing Boing: Repost the text of Trump’s calls for violence, get suspended from Twitter

Boing Boing: Repost the text of Trump’s calls for violence, get suspended from Twitter. “President Trump enjoys a vaguely-defined but formal exemption from Twitter’s policies on the grounds of his inherent newsworthiness. Recently, Twitter began putting warnings on his Tweets when they called for violent acts, which Trump considers censorship. A new Twitter account set out to see whether Twitter would simply suspend anyone else who posted what Trump does. It didn’t last long before the hammer fell.”

Lifehacker: How to Schedule Tweets on Twitter’s Website

Lifehacker: How to Schedule Tweets on Twitter’s Website. “Twitter finally added the ability to schedule tweets from its website. People have requested this feature for the better part of a decade, and you can now schedule all of your brilliant thoughts and witticisms throughout the day instead of just posting them at weird hours of the night. Though Twitter’s tweet scheduler is pretty straightforward, it does blend in a bit with the normal Twitter UI, so you might not even notice it’s there at first.”

How to find quoted replies and retweets on Twitter: Try this 10-second trick (CNET)

CNET: How to find quoted replies and retweets on Twitter: Try this 10-second trick. “You can tag a bot like Quoted Replies in a reply to the original tweet, which will then generate a link, but that means you have to let everyone know you’re lurking around a particular tweet. Not ideal. While there are other ways to get the job done, here’s one of the easiest ways to search and find all of the quoted replies and retweets for a particular tweet.”

Washington Post: Millions of tweets peddled conspiracy theories about coronavirus in other countries, an unpublished U.S. report says

Washington Post: Millions of tweets peddled conspiracy theories about coronavirus in other countries, an unpublished U.S. report says. “Roughly 2 million tweets peddled conspiracy theories about the coronavirus over the three-week period when the outbreak began to spread outside China, according to an unreleased report from an arm of the State Department, raising fresh fears about Silicon Valley’s preparedness to combat a surge of dangerous disinformation online.”

Towards Data Science: How to Scrape Tweets From Twitter

Towards Data Science: How to Scrape Tweets From Twitter. “This tutorial is meant to be a quick straightforward introduction to scraping tweets from Twitter in Python using Tweepy’s Twitter API or Dmitry Mottl’s GetOldTweets3. To provide direction for this tutorial I decided to focus on scraping through two avenues: scraping a specific user’s tweets and scraping tweets from a general text search.”

ZDNet: Want to analyse your tweets? How to import Twitter JSON data exports into Excel

ZDNet: Want to analyse your tweets? How to import Twitter JSON data exports into Excel. “It used to be easy to analyze your Twitter data: you’d go to your settings and ask for a download, and there among all the files would be a CSV file full of your tweets and the associated metadata. You could then load the CSV into Excel, convert it into a table, and save the resulting workbook. Once it was all in hand you were able to apply filters, searches, and, well, whatever analytical techniques you liked. But things have changed at Twitter, and if you request a download of your data it comes as a set of JSON files.”