Tubefilter: Jack in the Box hunts for a “Head Twitch Creator” to stream on its behalf

Tubefilter: Jack in the Box hunts for a “Head Twitch Creator” to stream on its behalf. “If you’re excited about streaming on Twitch but less excited about sharing your face with the internet, Jack in the Box has a solution for you. It is hiring a Head Twitch Creator, who will don a round, smiling head, put on a conical hat, and go live as Jack Box, the fast food brand’s mascot.”

WIRED: Success on Twitch No Longer Comes on Twitch

WIRED: Success on Twitch No Longer Comes on Twitch. “Burnout is inseparable from the platform’s identity. Streamers toil for the approval of audience and algorithm. Even Pokimane, one of the site’s famous faces, has had to take extended time off. Smaller streamers burn out too, anonymously: only an extraordinary few earn enough to make a living. Of the 6 million people who create content on the platform, more than 90 percent stream to fewer than six viewers; 25 percent of the top 10,000 highest-paid streamers make less than minimum wage.”

WIRED: Anyone Can Be a VTuber. Here’s How to Get Started

WIRED: Anyone Can Be a VTuber. Here’s How to Get Started . “VTubers is short for Virtual YouTubers, but encompasses Twitch streamers who use a virtual avatar as well. Everybody can be Kizuna AI now, and there’s countless ways of doing so. If you’re looking for where to begin, many existing VTubers recommend starting from a basic and almost-free (or as low-cost as possible) way.”

Tubefilter: More than 100 VTubers are taking over Twitch for a week-long celebration of virtual streamers

Tubefilter: More than 100 VTubers are taking over Twitch for a week-long celebration of virtual streamers. “VTubers are so hot right now, and Twitch is taking a week to celebrate that ascendant community. Between August 29 and September 2, the streaming platform is hosting a ‘VTuber takeover,’ which will bring together more than 100 virtual creators for workshops, spotlights, and tournaments.” I was not clear on VTuber so I looked it up. VirtualHumans.org had both an explanation and a ton of examples.

NBC News: Twitch will allow partners to stream on other platforms now

NBC News: Twitch will allow partners to stream on other platforms now. “Twitch has lifted its exclusivity agreement and now allows partners to create live content for other platforms like YouTube and Facebook, NBC News has confirmed. Twitch partners, who must meet certain criteria to monetize their channel and access exclusive support from the platform, had been long bound to an exclusivity agreement that only allowed them to stream on Twitch.”

Tom’s Guide: How to stream on Twitch

Tom’s Guide: How to stream on Twitch. “If you want to start streaming, theoretically, all you need to do is a computer and a somewhat stable internet connection. The whole process itself is so simple that you could set everything up before you reach the end of this article. However, if you’re keen on putting together a more polished setup, you could accomplish this within the hour, whether that’s using your gaming PC, laptop, console, or even your mobile phone.

Tubefilter: ‘Cult of the Lamb’ gets viewers into the game with Twitch integration

Tubefilter: ‘Cult of the Lamb’ gets viewers into the game with Twitch integration. “The roguelike game, developed by Massive Monster and published by Devolver Digital, arrived on seven different consoles on August 11. From a content creation standpoint, the most interesting thing about Cult of the Lamb is its unique set of Twitch integrations. By installing a PC extension (not today, Mac users), Cult of the Lamb players can give some in-game power to their streaming audiences.”

Ars Technica: Deadly swatting increasing on Twitch; alarmed streamers press for change

Ars Technica: Deadly swatting increasing on Twitch; alarmed streamers press for change. “These swatting attacks are conducted by anonymous persons making prank calls to police, falsely reporting emergency circumstances (like an armed potential mass shooter or a hostage situation that doesn’t exist) in order to get SWAT teams to descend, guns out, on a Twitch streamer’s location. The Washington Post reported this week that these swattings appear to be intensifying and can be traumatizing for targeted Twitch streamers. One trans Twitch streamer told the Post that police in London aimed an assault rifle at her face.”

Bloomberg: Twitch’s Gambling Boom Is Luring Gamers Into Crypto Casinos

Bloomberg: Twitch’s Gambling Boom Is Luring Gamers Into Crypto Casinos. “These days, ‘slots’ is the seventh most popular content category on Twitch, ahead of the video game Fortnite. Many streamers are paid handsomely to take part in the activity. One popular streamer said he makes “much more” than $1 million a month as part of his sponsorship with Stake to crypto gamble in front of live audiences on Twitch.”

University of Michigan: Moderating online content increases accountability, but can harm some platform users

University of Michigan: Moderating online content increases accountability, but can harm some platform users . “Marginalized social media users face disproportionate content removal from platforms, but the visibility of this online moderation is a double-edged sword. A new University of Michigan study about two online platforms—Reddit and Twitch—suggests that greater visibility means increased accountability, but the actions can also bring more attention to the offensive content, further harming marginalized people.”

Stalkers, Fan Threats, Police Raids: The Hidden Price of Twitch Fame (New York Times)

New York Times: Stalkers, Fan Threats, Police Raids: The Hidden Price of Twitch Fame. “Streamers on Twitch and other platforms have had stalkers show up at their homes and at fan conventions, been targeted by armed and violent viewers or dealt with swatting, a sometimes deadly stunt in which someone calls the local police to report a fake crime at a streamer’s home, hoping the raid will be caught live on camera.”

TechCrunch: Twitch builds toward a ‘layered’ safety approach with new moderator tools

TechCrunch: Twitch builds toward a ‘layered’ safety approach with new moderator tools. “On Twitch, interconnected channels already informally share information on users they prefer to keep out. The company is now formalizing that ad hoc practice with a new tool that lets channels swap ban lists, inviting communities to collaborate on locking serial harassers and otherwise disruptive users out before they can cause problems.”

By signing stars, YouTube aims to replicate Twitch’s secret weapon: culture (Washington Post)

Washington Post: By signing stars, YouTube aims to replicate Twitch’s secret weapon: culture. “Despite stacking its deck with big names, YouTube accounted for just 14 percent of streaming hours watched in the first quarter of this year according to a report published by analytics firms Streamlabs and Stream Hatchet. Twitch, a vastly smaller platform than YouTube overall, nonetheless claimed 76 percent.”