Indiana University: Tracking coordinated disinformation campaigns online made easier with new BotSlayer tool

Indiana University: Tracking coordinated disinformation campaigns online made easier with new BotSlayer tool. “The software, which is free and open to the public, scans social media in real time to detect evidence of automated Twitter accounts — or ‘bots’ — pushing messages in a coordinated manner, an increasingly common practice to manipulate public opinion by creating the false impression that many people are talking about a particular subject.”

ScreenRant: China Accused of Using Twitter Bots To Promote Disney’s Mulan After Hong Kong Backlash

ScreenRant: China Accused of Using Twitter Bots To Promote Disney’s Mulan After Hong Kong Backlash. “China is reportedly using Twitter bots to promote Mulan after Hong Kong backlash. The new live-action remake of Disney’s hit 1998 animated feature, Mulan, is due to arrive in theatres next spring. Lately, however, the film has been hit with a substantial bit of controversy over allegiances in the ongoing Hong Kong protests.”

Beware: Fake Twitter accounts exploit emergencies to spread misinformation (University of California, Irvine)

University of California, Irvine: Beware: Fake Twitter accounts exploit emergencies to spread misinformation. “When earthquakes, firestorms or hurricanes strike, people often turn to Twitter for instant updates from government agencies, news outlets and neighbors. But user beware: networks of automated fake Twitter accounts, or ‘bots,’ exploit exactly these emergency situations to spread propaganda or misinformation, says University of California, Irvine sociology graduate student Richard Gardner.”

Canada’s National Observer: Twitter bots boosted the trending #TrudeauMustGo hashtag

Canada’s National Observer: Twitter bots boosted the trending #TrudeauMustGo hashtag. “The hashtag #TrudeauMustGo soared to the top of Twitter’s trending list in Canada on Tuesday, perhaps giving some observers the impression that Canadians were taking to social media en masse to express their discontent with the prime minister. But a closer look revealed that much of the activity surrounding the hashtag was actually driven by accounts tweeting at non-human rates, including about two dozen accounts created in the past 48 hours.”

TNW: Wikipedia titles you can sing to the ‘Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles’ theme song, tweeted

I usually don’t post stuff like this, but it’s so gloriously silly I can’t help it. And heaven knows we all need a laugh these days. TNW: Wikipedia titles you can sing to the ‘Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles’ theme song, tweeted. “A while back, XKCD – a webcomic you should definitely be following – published a list of Wikipedia articles that have the same syllable stress pattern as the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles theme song. You know, something like ‘Puerto Rico Lizard-Cuckoo.’ Well, this has been taken a step further by enterprising Twitter user, __eel__. They created a Twitter bot that only posts real life Wikipedia articles whose titles can be sung to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles theme.”

EurekAlert: New application can detect Twitter bots in any language

EurekAlert: New application can detect Twitter bots in any language. “Thanks to fruitful collaboration between language scholars and machine learning specialists, a new application developed by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and Linnaeus University in Sweden can detect Twitter bots independent of the language used.”

Twitterbots: Anatomy of a Propaganda Campaign (Symantec)

Symantec: Twitterbots: Anatomy of a Propaganda Campaign. “One of the main talking points of the 2016 U.S. presidential election campaign involved attempts to surreptitiously influence public opinion using social media campaigns. In the months after the election, it quickly became apparent that a sophisticated propaganda operation had been directed against American voters. Not surprisingly, news of these campaigns caused widespread public concern, prompting social media firms to launch investigations into whether their services had been misused. In October 2018, Twitter released a massive dataset of content posted on its service by the Internet Research Agency (IRA), a Russian company responsible for the largest propaganda campaign directed against the U.S.”