CGTN Africa: Uganda eases COVID-19 restrictions including re-opening of schools and bars

CGTN Africa: Uganda eases COVID-19 restrictions including re-opening of schools and bars. “In a televised speech late on Friday, Uganda President Yoweri Museveni said pre-primary, primary, and secondary schools would be reopened on January 10. The East African nation had imposed some of Africa’s toughest restrictions. In September, some measures were eased, including allowing the resumption of education for universities and other post-secondary institutions.”

Covid in Uganda: The man whose children may never return to school (BBC)

BBC: Covid in Uganda: The man whose children may never return to school. “Ten of Fred Ssegawa’s children may never go back to school again. Locked out of formal education since March 2020 by Uganda’s strict coronavirus containment measures, they have been caught up in one of the world’s longest school shutdowns. The two youngest of his 12 children were too little to have started in the first place.”

Citizen Digital: Bloggers, social media users with huge following to be ‘monitored by the state’- Ugandan gov’t orders

Citizen Digital: Bloggers, social media users with huge following to be ‘monitored by the state’- Ugandan gov’t orders . “The Ugandan Communication Commission has asked social media users and bloggers with a large following to ‘register for monitoring by the state’. Those who fit the bill are required to have registered with the commission before October 5, 2020.”

TechJaJa: How is Uganda’s Social Media Tax impacting Citizens Two years later?

TechJaJa: How is Uganda’s Social Media Tax impacting Citizens Two years later?. “As of 23rd March 2020, Uganda has only confirmed one case of the novel coronavirus. The President of Uganda recently issued directives which saw all schools in Uganda closed effective March 20, all gatherings banned, the border’s closed, international flights banned, citizens urged to stay home and many others in order to curb the spread of the virus. But some of the measures for curbing this virus such as having people work remotely, students study at home and an increased reliance on digital transactions, are all hindered by Uganda’s social media and the mobile tax that was introduced in the country in July 2018. “

PML Daily: Excitement! Uganda receives Kings African Riffle digitized history

PML Daily: Excitement! Uganda receives Kings African Riffle digitized history. “The Uganda Government has received a piece of history of the King’s African Rifles (KAR) from the British Government at the Ministry of Defence and Veteran Affairs (MODVA) headquarters in Mbuya, Kampala. The Minister of Defence and Veteran Affairs Hon Adolf Mwesige received the digitalized KAR war records (war diary, medals and citations of KAR ex-service men) on behalf of the Ugandan Government.”

Techweez: Uganda Wants to Register Social Media Influencers

Techweez: Uganda Wants to Register Social Media Influencers. “In Uganda, it is being reported that the communications regulator has directed that influencers with large commercialized online followings must register their activities for monitoring with the sate. They say that this scheme will charge these influencers a $20 fee and it is aimed to clamp down on immoral or prejudiced content.”

Quartz: Uganda’s social media tax has led to a drop in internet and mobile money users

Quartz: Uganda’s social media tax has led to a drop in internet and mobile money users. “Uganda’s social media tax has proved to be detrimental to both its internet and mobile money sectors. In the three months following the introduction of the levy in July 2018, there was a noted decline in the number of internet users, total revenues collected, as well as mobile money transactions. In a series of tweets, the Uganda Communications Commission noted internet subscription declined by more than 2.5 million users, while the sum of taxpayers from over-the-top (OTT) media services decreased by more than 1.2 million users.”

University of Michigan: A MacArthur “Genius” Works to Preserve Uganda’s History

University of Michigan: A MacArthur “Genius” Works to Preserve Uganda’s History. “When Derek Peterson got word last October that he’d received a MacArthur ‘genius’ grant, he was thrilled. The award affirmed his scholarship and the work of LSA’s African Studies Center, where Peterson is a faculty member. But Peterson was especially happy because the $625,000 stipend that came with the MacArthur grant meant he could further his work saving endangered government archives in Uganda.”

Quartz: Uganda’s government is doubling down on its controversial social media tax

Quartz: Uganda’s government is doubling down on its controversial social media tax. “After a brief review period, Ugandan regulators have decided to double down on both the decision to charge citizens a daily levy for access to social media, and the controversial reasoning behind it. Since July 1, Ugandans have been paying 200 Uganda shillings ($0.05) a day to use social media. Whoever didn’t pay was blocked from accessing sites and apps like Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp and 55 others. To get round the blockade, many people have been using virtual private networks rather than pay the social media tax.”