Radio Times: BBC reveals new archive that allows access to 200,000 programmes – and early editions of Radio Times

Radio Times: BBC reveals new archive that allows access to 200,000 programmes – and early editions of Radio Times. “Formerly known as BBC Genome, the BBC’s Programme Index now makes the broadcaster’s archive more accessible than ever, with viewers able to browse over 10 million listings, 200,000 playable programmes and even early editions of Radio Times magazine.”

The Guardian: The push to archive the history of jungle and drum’n’bass

The Guardian: The push to archive the history of jungle and drum’n’bass. “Chingford Sainsbury’s may be an unlikely setting for an encounter that helped capture a key part of British cultural history, but MC Navigator’s weekly shopping trip to his local supermarket would prove crucial. Navigator, one of the leading figures in the jungle and drum’n’bass scene in the 1990s, bumped into Uncle 22 – another important player – who had been under the radar for years and was picking up some bits with his mum.”

Museums Association (UK): Collections Trust announces plans for improved national museums database

Museums Association (UK): Collections Trust announces plans for improved national museums database. “The Collections Trust is to retire Culture Grid this autumn as part of a move to develop a new and more sustainable national collections database. Created more than a decade ago, Culture Grid was built as a proof-of-concept service assisting organisations in sharing their collections safely online. By 2015, however, project funding was pulled, and Culture Grid became a legacy system closed to new accessions.” You can learn more about Culture Grid here.

The Guardian: BBC Four to become archive channel as cost-cutting drive continues

The Guardian: BBC Four to become archive channel as cost-cutting drive continues. “BBC Four is to cease commissioning new programmes and become an archive-focused channel as part of the ongoing significant cost-cutting drive across the corporation. The originator of acclaimed shows such as Charlie Brooker’s Wipe franchise, the Emmy-nominated drama Burton & Taylor and the Bafta-winning comedy Detectorists, BBC Four will now be repositioned as the ‘home’ of archived content, the broadcaster confirmed.”

Fyne Times: Queer Heritage South Launches Digital Museum

Fyne Times: Queer Heritage South Launches Digital Museum. “As museums across the country await reopening, Queer Heritage South are thrilled to launch an extensive new Queer Heritage South Digital Museum this month. Queer Heritage South is where LGBTQ+ heritage can be preserved, sourced and celebrated. This is not just a collection of exhibits but a comprehensive LGBTQ+ archive that the community of Brighton and beyond are invited to contribute to, enjoy and share.”

The Irish News: Music composed and recorded during lockdown to be preserved by British Library

The Irish News: Music composed and recorded during lockdown to be preserved by British Library. “People who composed and recorded music during lockdown are being given the opportunity to have their songs preserved in the British Library. BBC Radio 5 Live said it has been inundated with tracks from musicians ‘of all standards’ from across the UK. The station is giving listeners the chance to have the music they created behind closed doors to be stored forever in the Sound Archive of the library.”

The Guardian: UK public urged to find statues of women for gender gap database

The Guardian: UK public urged to find statues of women for gender gap database. “People are being urged to find female statues in their local areas as part of a campaign to record the sculptures and busts of ‘real-life women’ and redress the gender imbalance in civic monuments. The campaign group Public Sculpture and Statues Association (PSSA) has so far recorded 100 sculptures in the UK as part of its new public database. Its co-chair Joanna Barnes said the list was not comprehensive and new submissions were being made.”

Lancaster University: Lancaster project captures the glamour and glitz of cinema in the 1930s and beyond

Lancaster University: Lancaster project captures the glamour and glitz of cinema in the 1930s and beyond . “Photographs of fabulous film stars and fascinating interviews form part of a stunning new online showcase to capture 1930s cinemagoing in Britain. The website, to help researchers and the public in their quest for information about the silver screen in the 1930s and beyond, has just been launched.”

BBC: John Laing workers’ summer holiday photos added to archive

BBC: John Laing workers’ summer holiday photos added to archive. “Pictures of post-war workers heading off on their summer holidays have been added to an online archive. Historic England has spent almost two years digitising 10,000 pictures from the John Laing Photographic Collection for public viewing online. The latest and last to be added are 700 pictures taken by John Laing photographers for the construction firm’s in-house newsletter Team Spirit.”

Coronavirus: How Covid-19 hit the comedy industry (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: How Covid-19 hit the comedy industry. “Some half (49.2%) of comedy clubs in the UK say they will definitely face permanent closure without further funding or support, according to a Live Comedy Association (LCA) survey. The UK government is providing £1.5bn emergency arts funding, but comedy was not mentioned in the announcement. British comedian Mark Watson says this follows a long history of comedy being overlooked, despite playing a big part in UK culture.”

Adam Matthew Digital: Adam Matthew Digital publishes the first module of Mass Observation Project: 1981-2009

Adam Matthew Digital: Adam Matthew Digital publishes the first module of Mass Observation Project: 1981-2009. “This first of three modules covers the 1980s and is a fascinating source of personal diaries and first-hand accounts from a diverse range of ‘mass observers’ in Britain. The material consists of responses to questionnaires, referred to as directives, and covers a broad range of topics from global politics and events such as the emergence of AIDS and the Cold War; to details of the wonderful and the mundane in the everyday lives of individual responders. This range of topics makes it a truly rich source of primary source content on British social history.”