Heritage Made Digital: Tudor and Stuart manuscripts go online (British Library)

From last month and I missed it. Apologies to the British Library: Heritage Made Digital: Tudor and Stuart manuscripts go online. “The British Library is home to a world-class collection of manuscripts dating from the time of the Tudors and Stuarts. Over the past few years, we have been undertaking a major programme, known as Heritage Made Digital, with the intention of publishing online more treasures from the Library’s collections. This includes approximately 600 of these Tudor and Stuart manuscripts. Today, we’re very pleased to let you know that the first batch are available to view on our Digitised Manuscripts site — a list is published below.”

Southern Daily Echo: New website pays tribute to Far East prisoners of war

Southern Daily Echo: New website pays tribute to Far East prisoners of war. “THANKS to the untiring efforts of Earl Mountbatten and the 14th Army, the P&O steamship Corfu left Rangoon, in what was Burma, in September 1945 carrying over a thousand former Far East Prisoners of War. On the wet and dreary morning of October 7, 1945, she docked in Southampton, the first of a small armada of 28 assorted passenger ships that brought more than 20,000 released captives back to Southampton from South-East Asia over the winter of 1945/46, whilst 24 ships docked in Liverpool between October 8 and mid-December.”

BBC: John Laing workers’ summer holiday photos added to archive

BBC: John Laing workers’ summer holiday photos added to archive. “Pictures of post-war workers heading off on their summer holidays have been added to an online archive. Historic England has spent almost two years digitising 10,000 pictures from the John Laing Photographic Collection for public viewing online. The latest and last to be added are 700 pictures taken by John Laing photographers for the construction firm’s in-house newsletter Team Spirit.”

Irish Central: Online museum documents struggles of mixed-race Irish in Britain

Irish Central: Online museum documents struggles of mixed-race Irish in Britain. “The Mixed Museum recently launched the ‘Mixed Race Irish Families in Britain, 1700-2000′ exhibition which explores the social reactions to mixed-race Irish families in Britain over the course of three centuries. The online exhibition was curated by the Mixed Museum in conjunction with the Association of Mixed Race Irish and draws on materials from both organizations’ collections in addition to new and fascinating research.”

Reuters: Kenyan museum, Mau Mau fighter shed light on British colonial abuses

Reuters: Kenyan museum, Mau Mau fighter shed light on British colonial abuses. “The camps, where tens of thousands are thought to have died, are a traumatic but largely forgotten part of Kenya’s past. They were set up to jail activists and sympathisers during the Mau Mau uprising of 1952-1960, in which [Gitu Wa] Kahengeri, born in the 1920s and a Secretary General of the independence movement’s Veterans Association, participated. Using eye-witness accounts, documents and field visits, Kenyan and British historians from the Museum of British Colonialism are now building an online archive of the period, complete with 3D recreations of some of the camps.”

Adam Matthew Digital: Adam Matthew Digital publishes the first module of Mass Observation Project: 1981-2009

Adam Matthew Digital: Adam Matthew Digital publishes the first module of Mass Observation Project: 1981-2009. “This first of three modules covers the 1980s and is a fascinating source of personal diaries and first-hand accounts from a diverse range of ‘mass observers’ in Britain. The material consists of responses to questionnaires, referred to as directives, and covers a broad range of topics from global politics and events such as the emergence of AIDS and the Cold War; to details of the wonderful and the mundane in the everyday lives of individual responders. This range of topics makes it a truly rich source of primary source content on British social history.”

Londonist: The Home Of Black British History Is Creating A New Archive – With Your Help

Londonist: The Home Of Black British History Is Creating A New Archive – With Your Help. “Black Cultural Archives is the only national heritage centre dedicated to collecting and sharing the stories and histories of African and Caribbean people in Britain — check out examples from their amazing archives here. Now they’re crowdsourcing material to document the Black Lives Matter movement and protests of 2020: this is your chance to make sure that the records that future generations will have available to them of this time will reflect the reality.”

Qatar National Library: Qatar Digital Library Sheds Light on the First Communications Revolution in the Gulf

Qatar National Library: Qatar Digital Library Sheds Light on the First Communications Revolution in the Gulf. “…in the 1860s, Britain sought to build a commercial telegraph line all the way to its most important colony, British India. As a result, the Gulf became one of the most important communication corridors of the British Empire. A series of historical documents held by the British Library and now available on the QDL reveal how the proposal to extend Britain’s telegraph line through the Gulf was first made in May 1860. That month, John Wortley de la More, an entrepreneur in the telegraph industry, outlined his plans to extend the existing lines further through Persia and the Gulf by establishing a link first from Baghdad to Basra, and then from Basra to Karachi, British India’s westernmost port (in modern-day Pakistan).”

Something New From Anglotopia: Seebritish. art – A New Database Of Great Works Of British Art To Browse, Share, Download, And Enjoy (Anglotopia)

Anglotopia: Something New From Anglotopia: Seebritish.art – A New Database Of Great Works Of British Art To Browse, Share, Download, And Enjoy. “I have built something new, that I really wanted to exist. A free database of beautiful British art. While we’re all on quarantine, one thing we can’t do is visit our great art museums. And I miss them. I visit the Art Institute in Chicago as often as I can. When I travel to Britain, I always visit the art museums – I love gazing at good art, for as long as I can. It’s pretty far down on the list of things to miss while we’re all self-isolating. But I still miss it. So, I decided to do something about it. I have built an online gallery of British Art, viewable to anyone. It’s a virtual art gallery of the finest British art I could find. Now we can all have a virtual tour of Britain’s art history and canon.”

Asian and African Studies Blog: Digitised East India Company ships’ journals and related records

Asian and African Studies Blog: Digitised East India Company ships’ journals and related records. “Enhanced catalogue descriptions have been created for journals of ships that visited ports in the Gulf and the Arabian Peninsula, and these journals have been digitised and are being made freely available on the Qatar Digital Library website as part of the British Library/Qatar Foundation Partnership. They constitute an extraordinarily rich and valuable set of primary sources for numerous areas of research, including: the history of global trade networks; encounters between British merchants and crews and diverse people in different parts of Asia, Africa and elsewhere; the origins of British imperialism; rivalry between European powers in Asia; long-distance marine navigation; the experience of everyday life on board ship, and during lengthy voyages, for members of the crew; and historic weather patterns over the course of more than two centuries.”

Film News: BFI launches Britain On Lockdown a public call out to map the digital video response to Coronavirus

Film News: BFI launches Britain On Lockdown a public call out to map the digital video response to Coronavirus. “Today the [British Film Institute] launches a public campaign, Britain on Lockdown, calling on the British public to recommend those online videos that best represent how Britain has experienced the impact of Coronavirus. From Joe Wicks to Boris Johnson, solidarity for NHS frontline workers and local communities coming together through to comedy parodies, public health videos about the importance of proper handwashing and charity campaign films, online video has played a key role in our collective experience of the lockdown in a way that has never been experienced before.”

Broadway World: British Museum Revamps Collection Online

Broadway World: British Museum Revamps Collection Online. “The British Museum today launches a major revamp of its online collection database, allowing over 4 million objects to be seen by people anywhere in the world. This new version of the online database – officially called the British Museum Collection Online – has been unveiled earlier than planned so that people who are currently under lockdown measures due to Covid-19 can enjoy the treasures from one of the world’s great collections from the comfort of their own home.”

UK National Archives: Free access to digital records

UK National Archives: Free access to digital records. “We are making digital records available on our website free of charge for as long as our Kew site is closed to visitors. Registered users will be able to order and download up to ten items at a time, to a maximum of 50 items over 30 days. The limits are there to try and help manage the demand for content and ensure the availability of our digital services for everyone.”

The Guardian: George III’s vast collection of military maps goes online

The Guardian: George III’s vast collection of military maps goes online. “George III may never have left the south of England or fought on a battlefield, but he explored the world through a vast collection of military maps that are now being made available online, offering extraordinary insight into the art of warfare and mapping.”

Slate: Lives on the Line

Slate: Lives on the Line. “These handwritten logbooks offer a unique glimpse into the U.K.’s queer history. The help line started in 1974, partly to draw on the energy generated by the American Gay Liberation Front in the early ’70s. Volunteers set up the first phone line in the basement below a socialist bookshop in Kings Cross in London. They surely could not dream of the freedoms that were to come to LGBTQ people in the next few decades, or that Switchboard would still be taking calls in 2020.”