Slate: Lives on the Line

Slate: Lives on the Line. “These handwritten logbooks offer a unique glimpse into the U.K.’s queer history. The help line started in 1974, partly to draw on the energy generated by the American Gay Liberation Front in the early ’70s. Volunteers set up the first phone line in the basement below a socialist bookshop in Kings Cross in London. They surely could not dream of the freedoms that were to come to LGBTQ people in the next few decades, or that Switchboard would still be taking calls in 2020.”

William & Mary: ‘Hamilton’ heightens interest in King George III

William & Mary: ‘Hamilton’ heightens interest in King George III. “This month marks five years since England’s Royal Archives opened its collections from the Georgian monarchy to the public. By providing online access to these materials, scholars and historians around the globe are making new discoveries about the Georgian kings, and specifically about King George III…. Faced with nearly a half million pages of text to be transcribed, W&M Libraries is turning to the community for help.”

Prison History: How to use the Census for Prisons Research

Prison History: How to use the Census for Prisons Research. “Like for households, those who resided in state institutions, including prisons, had to be described and enumerated in the official census returns. In 1841, the process was handled by the local enumerators, and not all public institutions were included. In 1851, arrangements were made in advance for such institutions to send returns directly to the Census Office and, in consequence, coverage was much more comprehensive. The idea of a list of everyone resident in a prison – staff and prisoners alike – sounds like a gold mine for family historians and prison researchers alike. In many respects it is, as I will explain. First, though, it is important to point out that the census has one major limitation: it captured the population on a single night and only once every ten years.” This is for the UK.

Maidenhead Advertiser: Look back over hundreds of years of Advertiser and Express history in new online archive

Maidenhead Advertiser: Look back over hundreds of years of Advertiser and Express history in new online archive. “A digital archive launched today (Thursday) will allow people to delve into the pages of local history, some going back more than 200 years. The Baylis Media Ltd ePaper and Archive is an online portal which holds printed editions of the Advertiser from 1870, the Windsor Express from 1812 and the Slough Express from 1950.”

Londonist: Black Cultural Archives Just Made Over 4,000 Items Available Online

Londonist: Black Cultural Archives Just Made Over 4,000 Items Available Online. “The Black Cultural Archives in Brixton is one of London’s best resources for exploring the history of African and Caribbean communities in the UK. It’s continually open to the public, but has just become even more accessible, with the digitisation of over 4,000 items from its archives.”

British Library: Middle English manuscripts online

British Library: Middle English manuscripts online. “The British Library holds one of the most significant collections of manuscripts written in Middle English. Thanks to a very generous grant by The American Trust for the British Library, we have recently been able to digitize a sizeable number of them, the first batch of which can now be viewed on our Digitised Manuscripts site. ”