‘Illume my life’: Prince Albert’s passions digitised for website (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Illume my life’: Prince Albert’s passions digitised for website. “Thousands of photographs, prints and letters that reveal the private passions and public interests of Queen Victoria’s husband Prince Albert have been published online to mark the 200th anniversary of his birth. The Royal Collection has digitised 17,500 documents for a new website, the majority publicly available for the first time.”

News and Observer: UK to pressure social media companies to fight anti-vax info

News and Observer: UK to pressure social media companies to fight anti-vax info . “Britain’s government plans to call a summit of social media companies to discuss what more they can do to fight online misinformation about vaccines following a spike in measles cases.”

CNET: Instagram, YouTube and Facebook could be fined millions over harmful content

CNET: Instagram, YouTube and Facebook could be fined millions over harmful content. “Instagram, Facebook and YouTube could face huge fines for failing to remove toxic online videos as part of a crackdown by the UK government on harmful social media content. The government said on Monday that under new rules due to be introduced next year, tech companies would have to pay up to 5% of their revenue or even face restriction or suspension of services if they fail to remove content.”

Third Sector: Fixers trustees ‘working to find suitable home’ for digital archive

Third Sector: Fixers trustees ‘working to find suitable home’ for digital archive. “Trustees at the youth charity Fixers have sought to reassure supporters that they are working with senior management to find a ‘suitable charitable home’ for its digital archive before it closes at the end of the month.”

UKAuthority: TfL launches Cycling Infrastructure Database

UKAuthority: TfL launches Cycling Infrastructure Database. “Transport for London (TfL) has launched the Cycling Infrastructure Database for the city, describing it as the largest of its kind. It contains the location of more than 240,000 pieces of infrastructure such as cycle lanes and parking spaces, and has been made available to all of London’s boroughs and released as open data for third party developers.”