Your Local Guardian: Kingston University launches online archive of Leveson Inquiry

Your Local Guardian: Kingston University launches online archive of Leveson Inquiry. “Launched by former Prime Minister David Cameron in the wake of the phone-hacking scandal, the inquiry led by judge Sir Brian Leveson delved into the practices and ethics of the press. The new online archive, called Discover Leveson, features a range of witness statements, video testimonies and transcripts and hundreds of biographies and short essay guides.” If you’re not familiar with the Leveson Inquiry, the BBC has a backgrounder.

Science Daily: Skin cancer rates in England far higher than previously thought, according to new database

Science Daily: Skin cancer rates in England far higher than previously thought, according to new database . “Data from the newly established UK skin cancer database, the largest database of its kind in the world, has revealed that there are over 45,000 cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCC) every year in England, 350 per cent more than previous estimates suggested. Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common form of skin cancer.”

City A.M.: Report slams tech giants for lack of political lobbying transparency

City A.M.: Report slams tech giants for lack of political lobbying transparency. “Tech behemoths Amazon, Facebook and Google are among the worst-performing companies for political lobbying transparency, according to a new report from Transparency International UK.”

CNN: Internal documents Facebook has fought to keep private obtained by UK Parliament

CNN: Internal documents Facebook has fought to keep private obtained by UK Parliament. “The British Parliament has obtained a set of internal Facebook documents the social media giant has fought for months to stop from being made public, according to Facebook and a lawyer involved in a suit against the company.”

BBC: Facebook appeals Cambridge Analytica fine

BBC: Facebook appeals Cambridge Analytica fine. “Facebook has appealed a fine imposed on it by the UK’s data watchdog following the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The social network says that because the regulator found no evidence that UK users’ personal data had been shared inappropriately, the £500,000 penalty was unjustified.”