CNN: Another 778,000 Americans filed first-time unemployment claims last week

CNN: Another 778,000 Americans filed first-time unemployment claims last week. “The recovery in the American job market is still painfully slow. Another 778,000 people filed for first-time unemployment benefits last week on a seasonally adjusted basis. That was more than the 735,000 initial jobless claims that economists were expecting, and it’s also higher than last week’s revised number of 748,000. It’s the second straight week that first-time claims rose.”

Los Angeles Times: California has sent COVID-19 jobless benefits to Scott Peterson, death row inmates

Los Angeles Times: California has sent COVID-19 jobless benefits to Scott Peterson, death row inmates. “San Quentin inmate Scott Peterson, convicted of killing his wife and unborn son, received California unemployment benefits in recent months, according to a group of state and federal prosecutors who have been investigating fraud in the pandemic relief system administered by the state Employment Development Department. So did convicted serial killer Cary Stayner, who murdered two women and two girls near Yosemite in 1999 and now is jailed, near Peterson, on death row.”

CBS News: 1 in 4 Americans are jobless or earning poverty-level wages, new study finds

CBS News: 1 in 4 Americans are jobless or earning poverty-level wages, new study finds. “In October, more than 1 in 4 workers were either unemployed or working for poverty-level wages, according to an analysis of government data from the Ludwig Institute for Shared Economic Prosperity (LISEP). By comparison, the October jobless rate stood at 6.9%, down from 14.7% in April as workers regained jobs or gave up searching for work.”

Sacramento Bee: Here’s how hard the coronavirus pandemic hit Black workers in California

Sacramento Bee: Here’s how hard the coronavirus pandemic hit Black workers in California. “More than four of five Black workers in California have sought unemployment benefits during the covid pandemic — a rate nearly twice the state average. A new report from the nonpartisan California Policy Lab, obtained by McClatchy [November 18], illustrates dramatically how Black workers have been hit unusually hard by the coronavirus crisis.”

Washington Post: End of Year Means End of Federal Aid for Millions of Americans

Washington Post: End of Year Means End of Federal Aid for Millions of Americans. “A whole range of pandemic aid programs are set to expire in the new year, leaving millions of Americans without the government support that’s helped keep them afloat — and threatening to hold back a rebounding economy. The biggest blow will likely come from the end of two federal unemployment-insurance programs, with roughly 12 million people facing a late-December cutoff, according to a study released Wednesday by The Century Foundation. Also, measures that froze student-loan payments, offered mortgage forbearance and halted evictions have a year-end deadline –- and so do Federal Reserve lending facilities for small businesses and local governments.”

Coronavirus crisis: More than $7.2 billion in unemployment compensation paid out to Ohioans in last 34 weeks (Cleveland 19 News)

Cleveland 19 News: Coronavirus crisis: More than $7.2 billion in unemployment compensation paid out to Ohioans in last 34 weeks. “The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services reported 21,868 people filed for initial unemployment last week (Nov. 1-7) to the U.S. Department of Labor, which brings the total of unemployment claims filed in Ohio over the last 34 weeks to 1,850,676.”

Politico: How coronavirus is reshaping America’s job market

Politico: How coronavirus is reshaping America’s job market. “Just two-thirds of Americans were working for the same employer in September as they were in February, with the rest either landing new jobs or unemployed, according to the Real-Time Population Survey, a collaboration between researchers at Arizona State University and Virginia Commonwealth University. Brookings Institution researchers paint an even grimmer long-term picture, estimating that 42 percent of jobs lost due to Covid-19 will eventually be gone for good. Incomes are also dropping, indicating that many of these workers are transitioning into lower-paying jobs. More than 25 percent of U.S. workers earned less in September than they did in February, according to the Population Survey.”

New York Times: Out of Work in America

New York Times: Out of Work in America. “A conference call in which everyone on the line was laid off. An email declaring that a restaurant had served its last meal. A phone call from the boss before work saying to come in — and pack up all your things. In March and April, as the coronavirus began tearing through the country, Americans lost as many jobs as they did during the Great Depression and the Great Recession combined — 22 million jobs that were there one minute and gone the next. A job is a paycheck, an identity, a civic stabilizer, a future builder. During a pandemic, a job loss erases all that, when it is needed the most.”

BuzzFeed News: His Landlord Evicted Him During The Pandemic And Then Demanded $1,100 For Him To Get His Belongings

BuzzFeed News: His Landlord Evicted Him During The Pandemic And Then Demanded $1,100 For Him To Get His Belongings. “Ty is one of tens of thousands of Americans who have already been, or soon will be, evicted from their homes since the coronavirus pandemic led to widespread job and income loss in March. The combined forces of the economic fallout from the pandemic, tenuous contract employment, poor protections for tenants, and lack of access to affordable healthcare have created a miasma of conditions that has pushed those already living in a precarious state over the edge.”

USA Today: LinkedIn’s new tool helps users make a career change through overlapping skills

USA Today: LinkedIn’s new tool helps users make a career change through overlapping skills. “LinkedIn launched a new tool aimed towards helping recently unemployed Americans make a career change. The business social network unveiled the Career Explorer feature, which displays careers job seekers can transition into by finding skills that overlap with their previous jobs. The tool ranks the skills in order of importance depending on the job position.”

KVVU: Nevada Resilience Project launches website to provide resources for coping with COVID-19

KVVU: Nevada Resilience Project launches website to provide resources for coping with COVID-19. “The Nevada Resilience Project announced the launch of a new website Wednesday to help people manage the impacts of COVID-19. NRP was created to help build coping strategies for those experiencing stress or anxiety with COVID-19, the group said in a press release. The website… will list resources and information related to job loss, housing insecurity, isolation or healthcare challenges.”

New York Times: Jobless Workers Built Up Some Savings. Then the $600 Checks Stopped.

New York Times: Jobless Workers Built Up Some Savings. Then the $600 Checks Stopped.. “The $600 weekly unemployment benefit the federal government funded this year was a remarkably effective expansion of the safety net. It helped pay many workers more than their lost wages. It enabled families to spend more than during normal times. It even allowed households to put away savings as the economy was teetering. Then the money stopped at the end of July. And it’s clear, looking back, what happened next: Workers quickly burned through the reserves that the aid had given them.”

Phys .org: Asian Americans more affected by pandemic-related unemployment than any other racial group

Phys .org: Asian Americans more affected by pandemic-related unemployment than any other racial group. “While the lockdown associated with COVID-19 has negatively affected people from all walks of life, one U.S. minority group is bearing the brunt of unemployment. According to a new study by a quartet of University of Kansas researchers, the pandemic’s effect on the labor market has hit Asian Americans the hardest.”

‘My kids are starving’: Food banks and pantries see explosive demand in North Carolina as pandemic continues (CNBC)

CNBC: ‘My kids are starving’: Food banks and pantries see explosive demand in North Carolina as pandemic continues. “One of the most terrifying points of 2020 for Christian Sullins was not when she was unemployed as a result of pregnancy complications following the birth of her son in January. It was not when she was working as a waitress serving customers in March as the coronavirus pandemic began to rip through the U.S. And it was not when she lost her job just two weeks after returning to work when North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper issued state-wide stay-at-home orders. No, the worst moment came when Sullins, a 32-year-old mother of two, ran out of food.”