Google Blog: Culture needs us, as much as we need culture

Google Blog: Culture needs us, as much as we need culture. “On the occasion of World Heritage Day, UNESCO, Google Arts & Culture and our international partners are joining forces to promote access to and education around cultural and natural heritage through a new online resource, Explore UNESCO World Heritage. This is a unique opportunity to enjoy a virtual globetrotting tour of cultural landmarks and outstanding places of natural beauty, as well as to access accurate and reliable information on sites of outstanding universal value.”

The Art Newspaper: Unesco under fire for using Met objects in anti-trafficking campaign

The Art Newspaper: Unesco under fire for using Met objects in anti-trafficking campaign. “Unesco has pulled back images from an advertising campaign intended to highlight international trafficking in looted artefacts after receiving complaints that it misrepresented the provenance of the works pictured. Among the objects used in the campaign were three from the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York that were not stolen in recent years as the original ads indicated.”

Twitter Blog: Twitter builds partnership with UNESCO on media and information literacy

Twitter Blog: Twitter builds partnership with UNESCO on media and information literacy. “At Twitter, we have always championed the free flow of information and people’s right to free expression online. These complementary commitments intersect when we discuss media and information literacy. We want to empower the people who use our service to critically engage with the content they see. That’s why today, to mark the beginning of @UNESCO’s Global Media and Information Literacy Week 2019, we are launching a new handbook for educators, entitled Teaching and Learning with Twitter.”

Neowin: UN body raises concerns over digital assistants defaulting to female voices

Neowin: UN body raises concerns over digital assistants defaulting to female voices. “A new publication from UNESCO has raised concerns over digital assistants which default to a female voice and the impact this could be having on people. In the new report, called ‘I’d blush if I could’, UNESCO raises the concerns that it has and how they can be addressed.”

State Library of Western Australia: State Library’s oral histories recognised by UNESCO

State Library of Western Australia: State Library’s oral histories recognised by UNESCO. “The State Library of Western Australia’s Migration Voices collection of oral histories will be recognised by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) under its Australian Memory of the World Program (AMW). The program is aimed at identifying and safeguarding significant documentary heritage materials of national significance to Australia.”

UNESCO: UNESCO launches Observatory of Killed Journalists, tracking actions taken to punish crimes against media practitioners

UNESCO: UNESCO launches Observatory of Killed Journalists, tracking actions taken to punish crimes against media practitioners. “On International Day to End Impunity for Crimes against Journalists, 2 November, UNESCO launched the Observatory of Killed Journalists. The Observatory is an online database providing information on the status of judicial enquiries into each killing of a journalist or media worker recorded by UNESCO since 1993, based on information provided by the country in which the killing took place.”

Interview: UNESCO Archives Digitization Project (Ancient History Encyclopedia)

Ancient History Encyclopedia: Interview: UNESCO Archives Digitization Project. “Ancient History Encyclopedia has partnered with the UNESCO Archives, which we are very excited about. Our mission aligns very much with UNESCO, wanting to bring about peace and international understanding to the world through cultural heritage and education. We sat down with Mr. Adam Cowling, the Digitization Project Manager to talk about their project and where it is headed. What they do in their archives is absolutely fascinating.”

The Guardian: George Orwell archives added to Unesco Memory of the World register

The Guardian: George Orwell archives added to Unesco Memory of the World register. “The personal archives of George Orwell, containing the author and journalist’s first phrasing of the sinister slogan from Nineteen Eighty-Four, ‘War is Peace. Ignorance is strength. Freedom is slavery’, have been added to Unesco’s register of the world’s most significant documents.”

UNESCO: UNESCO launches the website for the International Year of Indigenous Languages (IYIL2019)

UNESCO: UNESCO launches the website for the International Year of Indigenous Languages (IYIL2019). “The website will contribute to raising the awareness about this International Year and about the urgent need to preserve, revitalize and promote indigenous languages around the world. There are some 6.000-7.000 languages in the world today. About 97% of the world’s population speaks only 4 % of these languages, while only 3 % of the world speak 96% of all remaining languages. A great majority of those languages, spoken mainly by indigenous peoples, will continue to disappear at an alarming rate. Without appropriate measure to address this issue, the further loss of languages and their associated history, traditions and memory would considerably reduce the rich tapestry of linguistic diversity worldwide.”

Devdiscourse: UNESCO and Inria will open universal library of computer programme source codes

Devdiscourse: UNESCO and Inria will open universal library of computer programme source codes. “The Softwareheritage initiative aims to preserve and share the source codes of all software programmes that have been giving life to computers since the middle of last century. Over 4 billion unique source code files, including their successive iterations and more than 83 million software projects in all fields are already available from the online archive. UNESCO encourages universal access to information and the preservation of knowledge. The Charter on the Preservation of Digital Heritage, adopted in 2003, states that digital documents include, among a wide range of electronic formats, texts, databases, images, audio-documents and Web pages.”

University of Toronto: Famed U of T Professor Marshall McLuhan’s library given United Nations heritage designation

University of Toronto: Famed U of T Professor Marshall McLuhan’s library given United Nations heritage designation. “University of Toronto professor and famed media theorist Marshall McLuhan’s legacy continues to reach far and wide, shaping the way people think about culture and technology. It’s his scope of influence that has earned McLuhan’s library and archives, housed at U of T and at Library and Archives Canada, a spot on the UNESCO Memory of the World register – a collection of documents and materials from all over the world that seeks to tell and preserve the story of humanity.”

US State Department: The United States Withdraws From UNESCO

US State Department: The United States Withdraws From UNESCO . “On October 12, 2017, the Department of State notified UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova of the U.S. decision to withdraw from the organization and to seek to establish a permanent observer mission to UNESCO. This decision was not taken lightly, and reflects U.S. concerns with mounting arrears at UNESCO, the need for fundamental reform in the organization, and continuing anti-Israel bias at UNESCO.”

UNESCO: Agreement on software preservation signed at UNESCO

UNESCO: Agreement on software preservation signed at UNESCO. “UNESCO and the National Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation (INRIA) today signed an agreement at the Organization’s headquarters to contribute to the preservation of the technological and scientific knowledge contained in software. This includes promoting universal access to software source code. The agreement was signed in the presence of the President of the French Republic, François Hollande, UNESCO’s Director-General, Irina Bokova, and INRIA’s Chief Executive Officer, Antoine Petit.”