UC Santa Barbara: ‘The Keepers of Presidential History’

UC Santa Barbara: ‘The Keepers of Presidential History’. “With 300,000 visitors from around the world each month, the American Presidency Project (APP) has come a long way since its inception as a class resource for a few hundred political science undergraduate students at UC Santa Barbara. Now, to better serve the media professionals, history buffs and curious citizens who regularly access the more than 125,000 records stored on the site, the American Presidency Project has unveiled an updated look and new search capabilities.”

Fighting Fake News Before It Was Trendy: TC’s Institute for Propaganda Analysis (Columbia University)

Columbia University: Fighting Fake News Before It Was Trendy: TC’s Institute for Propaganda Analysis. “Global tensions are simmering. Ethnic minorities are being persecuted. Propaganda and fake news stories are filling the headlines. How to sort fact from faction? It sounds familiar, but the year was 1937. At Teachers College, a new organization called the Institute for Propaganda – bankrolled by the department store magnate and philanthropist Edward Filene – has set up shop under Clyde Miller, a former reporter for The Cleveland Plain Dealer. As reported in The Columbia Journalism Review, for the next decade, IPA’s seven-member staff devoted its efforts to analyzing propaganda and misinformation in the news, publishing newsletters, and educating schoolchildren to be more tolerant of racial, religious, and ethnic differences.”

Pacific Standard Magazine: Has Hurricane Florence Destroyed Records Of America’s Slave Trade?

Pacific Standard Magazine: Has Hurricane Florence Destroyed Records Of America’s Slave Trade?. “North Carolina’s archivists are worried that fragile collections of documents, covering centuries of history, could have been destroyed by Hurricane Florence. Forecasters have predicted that the storm could cost up to $60 billion in economic damage, as people lost their homes, cars, and possessions to rainfall and flood water when the hurricane hit the eastern coast of the United States. But it’s harder to place a dollar value on the loss of North Carolina’s historic archives, which trace, among other things, the history of the slave trade and, later, Southern systems of racial segregation.”

Now Available! The Japanese American Internment Sites: A Digital Archive (Berkeley)

Berkeley: Now Available! The Japanese American Internment Sites: A Digital Archive. “The project builds upon two previous grants conducted between 2011-2017 to digitize 100,000 documents from the Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study and 150,000 original items from Bancroft’s archival collections including the personal papers of internees, correspondence, extensive photograph collections, maps, artworks and audiovisual materials. Together, these collections bring the total number of digitized and publicly available items to about 400,000 and form one of the premier sources of digital documentation on Japanese American Confinement found anywhere.”

Royal Central: Hamilton and Royal Archives join forces to teach history lesson

Royal Central: Hamilton and Royal Archives join forces to teach history lesson. “The actor who plays George III in the hit music Hamilton has been invited into the Windsor Castle library to study documents on the King as academics aim to inspire others to educate themselves about the historical figure. The Queen recently launched a project to open the Royal Archives from the reign of George III. They are releasing letters, diaries, and speeches digitally to give the public a broader understanding of the King. Scholars working on the papers of George III have had to work through 350,000 papers. They’ve selected 20 of those which are now grouped according to the musical; by theme and song lyrics.”

A Long Journey to the Washington Mall: A History of Black Museums (University of California Press)

University of California Press: A Long Journey to the Washington Mall: A History of Black Museums. “To commemorate the fortieth anniversary (1978–2018) of the African American Museum Association (AAMA), known today as the Association of African American Museums (AAAM), The Public Historian has published a special issue on ‘The State of Black Museums.’ We are pleased to make this issue free for you to read online for a limited time.” I came across this within the last couple of days but it was published in August. I checked two of the articles and it seems they are still available for free.

Mobile AR News: Google Puts Faces of Historic Women on US Currency via Augmented Reality

Mobile AR News: Google Puts Faces of Historic Women on US Currency via Augmented Reality. “Using image recognition, the new Notable Women app replaces the usual faces shown on various denominations of US currency with faces from the Notable Women database. Once enabled, the app also lets users tap the screen to read more about the person’s achievements.”