Just Security: Federal Agencies Face April Deadline on Secret JFK Files

Just Security: Federal Agencies Face April Deadline on Secret JFK Files. “Some 15,834 assassination-related documents remain partially or wholly classified, according to the National Archives. Most of these records were generated by the CIA and FBI. They include contemporaneous reports related to the murder of the 35th president in Dallas on November 22, 1963, files of CIA officers who knew about accused assassin Lee Harvey Oswald, and interviews conducted by congressional investigators in the 1970s.”

US Embassy in Singapore: Chargé d’Affaires Mansour Launches USSG55 Campaign Celebrating 55 Years of Diplomatic Relations between the U.S. and Singapore

US Embassy in Singapore: Chargé d’Affaires Mansour Launches USSG55 Campaign Celebrating 55 Years of Diplomatic Relations between the U.S. and Singapore. “On Monday, April 5, 2021, Chargé d’Affaires Rafik Mansour launched U.S. Embassy Singapore’s USSG55 campaign celebrating 55 years of diplomatic relations between the United States and Singapore. Starting this month, a combination of digital and traditional media elements branded with #USSG55 will showcase the United States and Singapore’s shared history, built on a strong foundation for a secure, prosperous, and innovative shared future. To kick off the campaign, a dedicated website will serve as a portal for the year’s events, programs, press releases, photographs, and more.”

Billings Gazette: Historian brings Montana single mom homesteader’s history to life

Billings Gazette: Historian brings Montana single mom homesteader’s history to life. “Lily Bell Stearns was no one important when she arrived by train in Montana in 1912. Stearns was a recent divorcee with three children, including one daughter left behind in a mental institution. Yet she now has her own online museum exhibit. Thanks to Sara Gregg, a University of Kansas associate professor of history and environmental studies, Stearns’ Eastern Montana homesteading story has been excavated like the bones of an unknown dinosaur. By poring over old documents, census records and letters, Gregg has unearthed the sad tale of a single woman struggling to survive in a wild, unforgiving land.”

National Library of Scotland: New digital resource on African American revolutionaries

National Library of Scotland: New digital resource on African American revolutionaries . “Struggles for Liberty takes its name from the phrase ‘struggles in the cause of liberty’, written by Lewis Henry Douglass (eldest son of Frederick Douglass) of his mother, Anna Murray Douglass’s tireless, heroic antislavery and social justice activism. The resource is structured by theme: the ‘Story of the Slave’; the History of Black Abolition; the US Civil War; African American activists in Scotland; and the Anna Murray and Frederick Douglass Family. It also includes interactive maps and downloadable learning activities for teachers, including activities mapped to the Curriculum for Excellence.”

University of Maine: First-ever online, bilingual portal to Franco American archives launches this spring

University of Maine: First-ever online, bilingual portal to Franco American archives launches this spring. “Franco American Digital Archives/Portail franco-américain, formerly known as the Franco American Portal project, will offer access to various primary sources about the French-Canadian, Acadian and Québécois(e) diaspora communities of the Northeast. Available records will include letters and other correspondence, scrapbooks, family and business records, newspapers, photographs and other media depicting Franco-American history, culture and people.”

Washington Post: A push to save landmarks of the ‘Great Migration’ — and better understand today’s racial inequities

Washington Post: A push to save landmarks of the ‘Great Migration’ — and better understand today’s racial inequities. “As a child in the 1950s, Amelia Cooper lived in a multigenerational home in Chicago’s Bronzeville neighborhood that often served as a settlement house for friends of her grandfather, the blues musician Muddy Waters. Many were musicians, arriving from the rural South as Waters had, and they needed a place from which to launch their new life….Cooper’s memory is a classic snapshot of the Great Migration, the period between 1916 and 1970 when Northern cities drew millions of Black Americans seeking greater economic opportunities and fleeing the racial violence and Jim Crow laws of Southern states. It was a seminal event, yet many of the sites that played so significantly into those years have fallen into disrepair or worse, the memories they held forgotten. But that is changing.”

The Verge: Artifacts from the first COVID-19 vaccination in the US are headed to the Smithsonian

The Verge: Artifacts from the first COVID-19 vaccination in the US are headed to the Smithsonian. “The glass vial used in the first US COVID-19 vaccination has been acquired by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. The museum also acquired related items including the scrubs and vaccination card of Sandra Lindsay, director of critical care nursing at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center who, on December 14th, 2020, became the first person in the US to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.”

Tom Hanks, The NBA, And COVID’s Day Of Reckoning In The US: An Oral History (BuzzFeed News)

BuzzFeed News: Tom Hanks, The NBA, And COVID’s Day Of Reckoning In The US: An Oral History. “So many forces of history years in the making converged on March 11 and were all subsumed by something few thought possible just weeks earlier. Suddenly there was no escape. The sentencing of Harvey Weinstein and the last moments of Bernie Sanders’ failing campaign against Joe Biden — huge milestones for the #MeToo movement and American politics — were abruptly overtaken. Even the experts at the World Health Organization would agree March 11 was a turning point — that was the date they officially declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic. BuzzFeed News reporters interviewed 65 people in four countries to tell the story of that fateful day.”

Emory News Center: New consortium will ensure future of SlaveVoyages database

Emory News Center: New consortium will ensure future of SlaveVoyages database. “The new consortium, organized by Emory, will function as a cooperative academic collaboration through a contractual agreement among six institutions: Emory, the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture at William & Mary, Rice University, and three campuses at the University of California that will assume a joint membership: UC Santa Cruz, UC Irvine and UC Berkeley. Membership is for a three-year term and is renewable.”

USA Today: Do Lincoln, Washington deserve statues? Chicago flags 41 controversial monuments for scrutiny

USA Today: Do Lincoln, Washington deserve statues? Chicago flags 41 controversial monuments for scrutiny. “City leaders on Wednesday flagged 41 controversial monuments, plaques and artworks for public discussion, months after the mayor formed a committee to review the city’s collection in the wake of a series of protests related to monuments last summer.”

The Hill: How VR is bringing Black history to life for middle schoolers across America

The Hill: How VR is bringing Black history to life for middle schoolers across America. “It’s a lot easier to bring down a statue than it is to put one up. But the Movers and Shakers of NYC found a way to cut through some of the red tape using a piece of technology most Americans have in their pockets. Using augmented reality, a new app allows students, teachers and the general public to learn Black history and pay tribute to the people who are often left out of textbooks. In addition to a catalog of monuments to women, people of color and the LGBT community, the Kinfolk app contains a digital archive of Black, Indigenous and Latin history.”

Florida Atlantic University: FAU Libraries Debuts Spirit Of America Digital Collection

Florida Atlantic University: FAU Libraries Debuts Spirit Of America Digital Collection. “The team created a digital collection of Weiner pamphlets. There are currently 585 pamphlets with more being added every day. This new endeavor greatly expands access and awareness of the Weiner Collection’s research materials.” Here’s a description from the collection page: “Originally inspired to emulate the personal libraries of men like Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, Marvin Weiner spent a lifetime collecting the books and pamphlets that a colonial gentleman would have owned. Taking great care to purchase the same editions that were available in 18th century America, Mr. Weiner eventually amassed a collection of more than 13,000 books, pamphlets, government publications, newspapers and serials, including rare works from as early as the 16th century.”

The Guardian: Historians having to tape together records that Trump tore up

The Guardian: Historians having to tape together records that Trump tore up. “The public will not see Donald Trump’s White House records for years, but there is growing concern the collection will never be complete – leaving a hole in the history of one of America’s most tumultuous presidencies. Trump has been cavalier about the law requiring that records be preserved. He has a habit of ripping up documents before tossing them out, forcing White House workers to spend hours taping them back together.”

Auburn Pub: Women’s park in Seneca Falls unveils digital collection

Auburn Pub: Women’s park in Seneca Falls unveils digital collection. “The Hunt family papers include more than 1,100 plans, contracts, essays, store records and correspondence from 1828 to 1856. They were held by the Jane and Richard Hunt family and private owners for more than 140 years. The park has been able to make them available online with support from the Northeast Museum Services Center, the park said in a news release.”