Mother Jones: Nearly 100 Confederate Monuments Were Toppled Last Year. What Happened to Them?

Mother Jones: Nearly 100 Confederate Monuments Were Toppled Last Year. What Happened to Them?. “Earlier this year, in April, I started a five-week, 7,300-mile road trip through the South to document Confederate monuments that had been taken down since George Floyd’s death the previous spring. My goal was to create a record of an unraveling—this moment in time when long-held narratives about Southern pride and the memorialization of Civil War ‘heroes’ are literally being knocked off their pedestals. I’m photographing the spaces where the monuments once stood, as well as where they’ve ended up. I’m also pairing these photos with archival images of the monuments, sometimes commemorated on postcards, other times in state and university archives, or in the Library of Congress.”

UNC Libraries: UNC-Chapel Hill joins project to investigate slavery and U.S. universities through archival records

UNC Libraries: UNC-Chapel Hill joins project to investigate slavery and U.S. universities through archival records. “In 2005, archivists at UNC-Chapel Hill developed “Slavery and the Making of the University.” The exhibition was one of the first systematic efforts on campus to examine the ways enslaved people enabled the University’s founding, growth and wealth. Sixteen years later, a new generation of archivists at the Wilson Special Collections Library is leading efforts to reconstruct the lived experiences of enslaved individuals at and around the University. Their efforts are part of On These Grounds: Slavery and the University.”

Book Riot: A Brief History Of U.S. Presidential Libraries

Book Riot: A Brief History Of U.S. Presidential Libraries. “Not all presidents have libraries, and they’re not all in the same places — or even in Washington, D.C., the nation’s capital. They are based in locations that are significant to presidents, like their home states. Open to the public, they include papers, photos, and footage of speeches — but more on that later. First, let’s get to how the presidential libraries were started in the first place.”

Auburn University: Auburn professors’ Selma ‘Bloody Sunday’ project gaining momentum through social media, public support

Auburn University: Auburn professors’ Selma ‘Bloody Sunday’ project gaining momentum through social media, public support. “Auburn University professors Richard Burt and Keith Hébert are turning to social media and the Selma, Alabama, community for help in making progress on their ‘Bloody Sunday’ passion project. The interdisciplinary tandem is enlisting a group of Auburn Honors College students to help expand the project’s reach to the social media realm, and they have established a Facebook page where visitors can connect and help identify marchers who participated in one of the seminal moments in civil rights history—Bloody Sunday on March 7, 1965, in Selma.”

University of Connecticut: History Professor Uncovers Missing Parts of a Prominent Life

University of Connecticut: History Professor Uncovers Missing Parts of a Prominent Life. “Cornelia Dayton, a professor of history at UConn, has helped uncover some missing pieces in the life story of Phillis Wheatley, author of the first volume of poetry published by an African American. In a prize-winning research paper recently published in the New England Quarterly, Dayton describes her findings on the later parts of Wheatley’s life.” A Web site showcasing the research is underway.

PRNewswire: Accessible Archives® Releases New Collection Invention and Technology in America: American Inventor, 1878-1887 (PRESS RELEASE)

PRNewswire: Accessible Archives® Releases New Collection Invention and Technology in America: American Inventor, 1878-1887 (PRESS RELEASE). “Accessible Archives, Inc., a digital publisher of full-text primary source historical collections, announces the release of a new primary source collection – Invention and Technology in America: American Inventor, Part I: 1878-1882 and Part II: 1883-1887. Invention And Technology In America: American Inventor provides an exclusive opportunity to investigate the history of American invention and the interaction of technology with social, economic, and cultural change throughout the course of the late 19th and early 20th century.”

National Archives: Celebrate Constitution Day with the National Archives (virtually)

National Archives: Celebrate Constitution Day with the National Archives (virtually). “The National Archives celebrates the 234th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution with a book talk, ‘The People’s Constitution: 200 Years, 27 Amendments, and the Promise of a More Perfect Union,’ a kids’ program with James Madison, and We Rule! – our new civics initiative! The National Archives is the permanent home of the original Constitution. Constitution Day celebrates the signing of this landmark document in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787. These programs are free, but advanced registration is encouraged. See Celebrating Constitution Day for an array of related online resources.”

Fast Company: Did you live through 9/11? Tell future generations about it with an AI-powered interactive video

Fast Company: Did you live through 9/11? Tell future generations about it with an AI-powered interactive video. “Over the coming days, social media channels will be awash in people honoring the 20th anniversary of 9/11 as well as recounting their experiences on that day through tweets and Facebook posts. But one startup is offering users a unique way for people to tell their story of 9/11: by creating an AI-powered oral history video.”

West Virginia University: WVU Libraries opens ‘Intelligence and Oversight After 9/11’ exhibit online

West Virginia University: WVU Libraries opens ‘Intelligence and Oversight After 9/11’ exhibit online. “Using select materials from the archives of Senator Jay Rockefeller, the exhibit and digital collection explore how the intelligence community and Senate Select Committee on Intelligence responded to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The exhibit text is derived from the Memorandum for the Record regarding a review of Senator John D. Rockefeller’s Service on the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence: 2001-2015.”

‘Stories make us human’: Kennebunk museum catalogs how Mainers remember 9/11 attacks (Seacoastonline)

Seacoastonline: ‘Stories make us human’: Kennebunk museum catalogs how Mainers remember 9/11 attacks . “Each one of us who was alive and old enough on Sept. 11, 2001, has a personal story to tell about that moment in history, when terrorists hijacked planes, used them as missiles against symbols of American economic and military might, and dealt the nation one of its darkest and deadliest tragedies. In Kennebunk, many of those local personal stories are captured in the Brick Store Museum’s new online exhibit, ’20 Years Later: Community Memories of 9/11.’”

Smithsonian Magazine: Free Online Resources About 9/11

Smithsonian Magazine: Free Online Resources About 9/11 . “Individuals hoping to learn more about this multifaceted history may find it difficult to know where to start. To support this search, Smithsonian has compiled a list of 12 free resources that deepen readers’ understanding of the September 11 attacks and their complicated, painful legacy. From the Library of Congress to the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, these archives, databases and web platforms help researchers and members of the public alike make sense of one of the most defining events of the 21st century.”