Daniel Miessler: It Appears China is Building a Massive Espionage Database on America

Daniel Miessler: It Appears China is Building a Massive Espionage Database on America. “I’ve mentioned this in numerous places for the last few years, so I decided it was time to finally put it into a formal piece. It seems obvious at this point that China is building a massive database of information on American individuals and companies, which they can then use for various purposes—including espionage, intellectual property theft, extortion, and other types of coercion.”

The Guardian: Memes, technology and sci-fi: what to expect from art in the US in 2019

The Guardian: Memes, technology and sci-fi: what to expect from art in the US in 2019. “With our dependency on smartphones, our Netflix addictions and with almost half the country on dating apps, our devices are becoming dangerously inseparable from our everyday lives. From surveillance to selfie vanity and memes, a series of technology-themed exhibits are coming to the US next year, which trace the evolution of photography, show the roots of social media and share how technology can actually be a force for good.”

University of Arkansas: Libraries Launch Digital Collection on American Old West

University of Arkansas: Libraries Launch Digital Collection on American Old West. “Whiskey smuggling, murder, scandal and a ‘hanging judge’ — the latest digital exhibit from University Libraries has all this and more. The Deputy Marshal Addison Beck and Judge Isaac Parker’s Court collection is now available worldwide, free of charge. Addison Beck was a deputy marshal for the United States from 1875 to 1883 who patrolled for the United States District Court for the Western District of Arkansas in Fort Smith.”

US Department of State: Office of the Historian, Bureau of Public Affairs Releases Fourteen Newly Digitized Foreign Relations of the United States Volumes

US Department of State: Office of the Historian, Bureau of Public Affairs Releases Fourteen Newly Digitized Foreign Relations of the United States Volumes . “The Department of State today announces the release of newly digitized versions of fourteen volumes from the Foreign Relations of the United States series, the official documentary record of U.S. foreign relations. These volumes cover events that took place between 1861 and 1866 and were originally published in print between 1861 and 1867.”

New York Times: Digital Divide Is Wider Than We Think, Study Says

New York Times: Digital Divide Is Wider Than We Think, Study Says. “Ferry County in northeastern Washington spans more than 2,200 square miles of mostly forestland, rivers and lakes. And according to the Federal Communications Commission, everyone in the sprawling county has access to broadband internet. But that is not the reality experienced by the roughly 7,500 residents of this county, which is rich in natural beauty but internet-poor.”

Implant files: International journalism body creates database to track faulty medical devices (Scroll .in)

Scroll .in: Implant files: International journalism body creates database to track faulty medical devices. “The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists has compiled a global database of medical devices that are either faulty or dangerous. It allows users to explore more than 70,000 recalls, safety alerts and field safety notices of medical devices in 11 countries – Australia, Canada, Finland, India, Lebanon, Mexico, Netherlands, Peru, Spain, Switzerland and the United States – in its first release.”

Phys .org: Canadians’ and Americans’ Twitter language mirrors national stereotypes, researchers find

Phys. org: Canadians’ and Americans’ Twitter language mirrors national stereotypes, researchers find. “A new study examining differences in the language used in nearly 40-million tweets suggests national stereotypes—Canadians tend to be polite and nice while Americans are negative and assertive—are reflected on Twitter, even if those stereotypes aren’t necessarily accurate.”