Sierra Sun Times: National Park Service Awards More than $3.1 Million in Grants to Preserve and Interpret World War II Japanese American Confinement Sites

Sierra Sun Times: National Park Service Awards More than $3.1 Million in Grants to Preserve and Interpret World War II Japanese American Confinement Sites. “The National Park Service is pleased to announce more than $3.1 million in Japanese American Confinement Sites grants that will fund preservation, restoration and education projects throughout the country. The 22 projects funded will help tell the stories of the more than 120,000 Japanese Americans, two-thirds of whom were U.S. citizens, imprisoned by the U.S. government during World War II following the attack on Pearl Harbor by the nation of Japan in 1941.”

Coronavirus in the U.S.: An Unrelenting Crush of Cases and Deaths (New York Times)

New York Times: Coronavirus in the U.S.: An Unrelenting Crush of Cases and Deaths. “In New York City, the daily onslaught of death from the coronavirus has dropped to half of what it was. In Chicago, a makeshift hospital in a lakefront convention center is closing, deemed no longer needed. And in New Orleans, new cases have dwindled to a handful each day. Yet across America, those signs of progress obscure a darker reality. The country is still in the firm grip of a pandemic with little hope of release. For every indication of improvement in controlling the virus, new outbreaks have emerged elsewhere, leaving the nation stuck in a steady, unrelenting march of deaths and infections.”

Thanks to COVID-19, there’s a new category in retail: the cloth face mask (Marketplace)

Marketplace: Thanks to COVID-19, there’s a new category in retail: the cloth face mask. “Every time I scroll through my Instagram feed now, there’s another ad for another company selling face masks. There are the classic ones in neutral tones. The ones made of organic cotton. The ones with → your company’s logo ← here. Overnight, the face mask has become America’s new T-shirt.”

PR Newswire: Sandra Day O’Connor Digital Library Launched (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Sandra Day O’Connor Digital Library Launched (PRESS RELEASE). “The Sandra Day O’Connor Institute today launched its comprehensive Digital Library which catalogs the life and work of Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, the first woman to serve on the United States Supreme Court. For the first time, Justice O’Connor’s body of work across her decades in public service is available in an easily accessible, searchable format.”

Christian Science Monitor: New website shines light on hidden figures in black history

Christian Science Monitor: New website shines light on hidden figures in black history. “The website Black Quotidian features profiles of hundreds of lesser known African American figures who made their marks in U.S. society. The creator, a Dartmouth College professor, wanted to provide a fresh look at the lives of ordinary black Americans.” I didn’t see the URL of the site anywhere in the story! It’s http://blackquotidian.org/ .

The Atlantic: Mapping Wikipedia

The Atlantic: Mapping Wikipedia. “Every time anyone edits Wikipedia, the software records the text added or removed, the time of the edit, and the username of the editor. (This edit history is part of Wikipedia’s ethos of radical transparency: Everyone is anonymous, and you can see what everyone is doing.) When an editor isn’t logged in with a username, the software records that user’s IP address. I parsed all of the 884 million edits to English Wikipedia to collect and geolocate the 43 million IP addresses that have edited English Wikipedia. I also counted 8.6 million username editors who have made at least one edit to an article. The result is a set of maps that offer, for the first time, insight into where the millions of volunteer editors who build and maintain English Wikipedia’s 5 million pages are—and, maybe more important, where they aren’t.”

New Online Resource: War Powers and Presidential Practice (Just Security)

Just Security: New Online Resource: War Powers and Presidential Practice. “Today we are excited to announce the release of the War Powers Resolution Reporting Project, a product of the Reiss Center on Law and Security at NYU School of Law. ([Tess] Bridgeman is the project’s lead author and researcher; [Rachel] Goldbrenner is the executive director of the Reiss Center.) Intended for use by policymakers, legislators, scholars, journalists and the general public, the Project is an expansive new resource that analyzes the war powers reporting practice of every president in the 45 years since the WPR was enacted. It sheds light on how presidents use U.S. armed forces abroad and relationships between the president and Congress on matters of war and peace.”